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NEWS
October 20, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
On Oct. 12, New York Times editorial writer Adam Cohen penned a hit piece masquerading as a profile of Bobby Jindal, the remarkable Republican gubernatorial candidate in Louisiana. Cohen began by noting that while Jindal's primary night victory celebration was attended by a diverse mix of whites and Indian-Americans, "there was scarcely a black reveler there. " How many "black revelers" were in attendance at Democratic rival Kathleen Blanco's election night gathering Cohen did not see fit to print.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1997 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a newspaper battle brewing in Happy Valley. In one corner is the Centre Daily Times, hometown newspaper of State College, its pages sprinkled with stories from the state's heartland: farming, growth and local government mixed with Little League, church bingo and Penn State football. Full-page ads cost $2,000, the news staff numbers 40 and many of its 25,000 loyal readers don't take kindly to MTV awards splashed across its front page. But can this small, but respectable community newspaper go toe to toe with the mighty newspaper of all newspapers?
BUSINESS
June 11, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The New York Times will buy the company that owns the Boston Globe for $1.1 billion under an agreement approved yesterday by the boards of both companies, the New York paper reported in today's issues. The largest in newspaper history, the sale would end family control at one of the last major independent papers in the country. It was to be announced in today's Globe as well. For now, terms of the sale ensure that the two newspapers will remain separate. According to sources at the Globe, the negotiations included contracts guaranteeing the employment of senior management.
NEWS
November 22, 2005 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's simply not true that Maureen Dowd eats men for breakfast. I know because I had breakfast with her recently at the Four Seasons Hotel in Manhattan, and she didn't even poke me with a fork. Here's what happened: When the waitress came, Dowd ordered a sensible raspberry yogurt. "I'm in the mood for something manly," I said. So I ordered two eggs sunny-side up and a side of corned beef. "That sounds really good," Dowd said. "Can I switch to that, too?" I knew then that Dowd was my kind of woman.
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite a clear sense of unease about the risk to newspapers of becoming the target of future blackmailers, most scholars and editors interviewed yesterday said they thought the Washington Post and New York Times had acted properly in printing the 35,000-word tract to placate the mail-bomber known as the Unabomber. "Every professional instinct within me believes that it was the wrong decision," said Marvin Kalb, the former NBC and CBS reporter who now directs the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't really want to like Anna Quindlen, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist, bestselling novelist, and devoted wife and mother of three whose achievements seem to suggest that women can, indeed, have it all. It doesn't help that Quindlen, 42, recently turned down a shot at a top managerial job at the Times - perhaps, in time, the top job - in order to plunge full time into a promising literary career. Who among us even has such a choice? Where, one can't help wondering, have the rest of us gone wrong?
NEWS
December 31, 2015
Robert Spitzer, 83, a psychiatrist who played a leading role in establishing agreed-upon standards to describe mental disorders and eliminating homosexuality's designation as a pathology, died of heart problems Friday in Seattle, said his wife, Janet Williams, a Columbia University professor emerita. Dr. Spitzer's work on several editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or the D.S.M., defined all of the major disorders "so all in the profession could agree on what they were seeing," said Williams, who worked with him on D.S.M.-III, which was published in 1980.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITER
Former Gov. Ed Rendell, a close friend of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, told the New York Times over the weekend that he might back his buddy if he runs for president as an independent. The caveat for Rendell, a longtime proponent of Hillary Clinton's bid for the presidency: He would only back Bloomberg if U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont won the Democratic nomination. On Monday, Rendell walked that back a bit while speaking with The Inquirer. "I like Bernie Sanders.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
WATERLOO, Iowa - Assailed by Donald Trump a day earlier, Gov. Christie on Tuesday said little as he brushed off the GOP rival's barrage, which encompassed attacks on New Jersey's economy, the George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal, and Christie's embrace of President Obama at the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy. "It just appears to me that the Christmas spirit left Donald after only three days," Christie told reporters at Elly's Tea & Coffee in Muscatine, in eastern Iowa. He then wished Trump and his family a happy New Year, adding, "I'll see him in New Hampshire.
FOOD
March 24, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The way Jim Hamilton tells it, he's a bit fearful of his daughter for good reason. Once rebuked, twice shy, or something like that, says the man behind Hamilton's Grill Room, a Lambertville, N.J., landmark for more than two decades. The daughter who generates quakes is his youngest, Gabrielle, 46, best known as the chef/owner of the acclaimed restaurant Prune in lower Manhattan and now starring in her own nonfiction. Her memoir, Blood, Bones & Butter , The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef (Random House, March, 2011)
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NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITER
Former Gov. Ed Rendell, a close friend of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, told the New York Times over the weekend that he might back his buddy if he runs for president as an independent. The caveat for Rendell, a longtime proponent of Hillary Clinton's bid for the presidency: He would only back Bloomberg if U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont won the Democratic nomination. On Monday, Rendell walked that back a bit while speaking with The Inquirer. "I like Bernie Sanders.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
WATERLOO, Iowa - Assailed by Donald Trump a day earlier, Gov. Christie on Tuesday said little as he brushed off the GOP rival's barrage, which encompassed attacks on New Jersey's economy, the George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal, and Christie's embrace of President Obama at the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy. "It just appears to me that the Christmas spirit left Donald after only three days," Christie told reporters at Elly's Tea & Coffee in Muscatine, in eastern Iowa. He then wished Trump and his family a happy New Year, adding, "I'll see him in New Hampshire.
NEWS
December 31, 2015
Robert Spitzer, 83, a psychiatrist who played a leading role in establishing agreed-upon standards to describe mental disorders and eliminating homosexuality's designation as a pathology, died of heart problems Friday in Seattle, said his wife, Janet Williams, a Columbia University professor emerita. Dr. Spitzer's work on several editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or the D.S.M., defined all of the major disorders "so all in the profession could agree on what they were seeing," said Williams, who worked with him on D.S.M.-III, which was published in 1980.
NEWS
December 15, 2015
NEW YORK - The 117th Pennsylvania Society gala over the weekend was odd. Odd beyond the basic oddness of thousands of Pennsylvanians trekking lemming-like each December to preen and be seen in the Big Apple in praise of home-state politics. An event long known for its annual sameness this year broke its own mold - no doubt because this year there isn't much to praise. State budget mess? Kathleen Kane? Supreme Court mess? Porngate? The Legislature? The Wolf administration?
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
People, aren't we better than this? Have we really become the Republic of Fear? Listening to Donald Trump, you'd certainly think so. His proposal to ban all Muslims from entering the country was only the latest of an endless series of ugly and bigoted tirades meant to stoke fear and anger. Yet adoring thousands still flock to his rallies. The New York Times, after analyzing every public Trump utterance for a week, noted several powerful patterns of speech common to demagogues of the past century.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John D. Backe, 83, of Gladwyne, the CBS chief executive who led the network to reclaim its top prime-time TV ranking in the 1970s, only to be forced out in a power struggle, died Thursday, Oct. 22, of heart failure at Waverly Heights. Mr. Backe took the reins of CBS in 1976 and began making marketing and technological changes designed to reverse the drop in network revenue and the exit of programming executives. He restructured the company and pressed for expansion into cable television, TV movies, and video, but the moves put him at odds with network founder William S. Paley, who was slow to embrace the new areas, according to the New York Times.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
MOONACHIE, N.J. - A day after his appearance in the third GOP presidential debate in Colorado, Gov. Christie took a break from the campaign trail Thursday to mark the third anniversary of Hurricane Sandy on his home turf. But he didn't linger, departing right after giving remarks in the warehouse of a moving company that had flooded in Moonachie - a Bergen County borough hit by the storm - and taking no questions from reporters. He was due Friday in Iowa, continuing a campaign that the New York Times editorial board belittled Thursday as "nothing more than a vanity project," urging the low-polling governor to end his bid and attend to a state "in trouble.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Michael Klein and Craig LaBan, Staff Writers
Restaurant pros are suddenly more passionately divided than ever on whether tipping should be a thing of the past. But most locals still plan to wait and see how influential restaurateur Danny Meyer fares with his game-changing new plans to raise prices and do away with gratuities at his 13 New York restaurants. Eli Kulp and Ellen Yin of the High Street Hospitality Group support the movement in theory. "The idea of eliminating tipping has been a very big conversation in our company lately as well," says Kulp.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Tempus fugit. That's Latin for "when the hell did that happen?" Or, literally, "time flies. " I say that because that's how time feels, especially as we get older and we're moving more slowly. In fact, not only is time flying, but so is everything else, and especially nowadays, when email is the new snail mail. I can't remember the last handwritten letter I got, but then again, I can't remember anything. These days, texting seems to be the preferred mode of communication, and it used to be that I texted only with Daughter Francesca and Besties Laura and Franca, but now my plumber will text me and so will any assorted tradesperson, including the guy who came to pick up the Porta Johns after my book club party.
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
In his latest presidential pitch, Gov. Christie is pledging to restore "law and order," drawing on recent crimes and killings of police to accuse President Obama of encouraging "lawlessness. " Alleging that Obama hasn't adequately responded to killings of police officers, Christie has described police as being "hunted. " He has gone on the attack over an uptick in homicides in New York, deeming the city "less safe," blasting "liberal policies," and endorsing a return to stop-and-frisk to "empower" officers - after a federal judge in 2013 ruled that the city's tactics violated the constitutional rights of minorities.
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