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NEWS
October 20, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
On Oct. 12, New York Times editorial writer Adam Cohen penned a hit piece masquerading as a profile of Bobby Jindal, the remarkable Republican gubernatorial candidate in Louisiana. Cohen began by noting that while Jindal's primary night victory celebration was attended by a diverse mix of whites and Indian-Americans, "there was scarcely a black reveler there. " How many "black revelers" were in attendance at Democratic rival Kathleen Blanco's election night gathering Cohen did not see fit to print.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1997 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a newspaper battle brewing in Happy Valley. In one corner is the Centre Daily Times, hometown newspaper of State College, its pages sprinkled with stories from the state's heartland: farming, growth and local government mixed with Little League, church bingo and Penn State football. Full-page ads cost $2,000, the news staff numbers 40 and many of its 25,000 loyal readers don't take kindly to MTV awards splashed across its front page. But can this small, but respectable community newspaper go toe to toe with the mighty newspaper of all newspapers?
BUSINESS
June 11, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The New York Times will buy the company that owns the Boston Globe for $1.1 billion under an agreement approved yesterday by the boards of both companies, the New York paper reported in today's issues. The largest in newspaper history, the sale would end family control at one of the last major independent papers in the country. It was to be announced in today's Globe as well. For now, terms of the sale ensure that the two newspapers will remain separate. According to sources at the Globe, the negotiations included contracts guaranteeing the employment of senior management.
NEWS
November 22, 2005 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's simply not true that Maureen Dowd eats men for breakfast. I know because I had breakfast with her recently at the Four Seasons Hotel in Manhattan, and she didn't even poke me with a fork. Here's what happened: When the waitress came, Dowd ordered a sensible raspberry yogurt. "I'm in the mood for something manly," I said. So I ordered two eggs sunny-side up and a side of corned beef. "That sounds really good," Dowd said. "Can I switch to that, too?" I knew then that Dowd was my kind of woman.
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite a clear sense of unease about the risk to newspapers of becoming the target of future blackmailers, most scholars and editors interviewed yesterday said they thought the Washington Post and New York Times had acted properly in printing the 35,000-word tract to placate the mail-bomber known as the Unabomber. "Every professional instinct within me believes that it was the wrong decision," said Marvin Kalb, the former NBC and CBS reporter who now directs the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't really want to like Anna Quindlen, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist, bestselling novelist, and devoted wife and mother of three whose achievements seem to suggest that women can, indeed, have it all. It doesn't help that Quindlen, 42, recently turned down a shot at a top managerial job at the Times - perhaps, in time, the top job - in order to plunge full time into a promising literary career. Who among us even has such a choice? Where, one can't help wondering, have the rest of us gone wrong?
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
CLEVELAND - It wasn't the role he had hoped for. But while Gov. Christie didn't address the Republican National Convention as the party's new presidential nominee Tuesday night - or as that nominee's running mate - he might have given the same speech if he were. "As a former federal prosecutor, I welcome the opportunity to hold Hillary Clinton accountable for her performance and her character," said Christie, who previously served as U.S. attorney for New Jersey. He then launched into a speech that would stir one of the stronger reactions of the night from the crowd that had nominated Donald Trump for president earlier inside the Quicken Loans Arena.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
THE ANNOUNCEMENT by former U.S. Sen. Harris Wofford (D, Pa.) that he would marry again Saturday at age 90, this time to a man 50 years his junior, hit the Web like another naked Kim Kardashian selfie. As someone who once interviewed Wofford, I was as shocked as anyone. The news didn't break the Internet, but the venerable Democrat, who worked with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and helped start the Peace Corps, got people talking. His relationship challenges traditional notions of heterosexuality and of love.
NEWS
October 4, 1986
At last we know why our illustrious mayor doesn't know what is going on in Philadelphia. He's off somewhere reading the New York Times. B. L. Lockridge-Bluitt Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
NEW YORK - Just a few years ago, Philadelphia came into its own as a magnet for ambitious young chefs from around the country who sought their culinary fortunes in a city rich with restaurant opportunity. But the story line has now reversed, as Philadelphia's restaurant stars have begun exporting their brands, especially, at the moment, to Manhattan. These days, New Yorkers can find spicy dandan heaven at a Han Dynasty in the East Village. Or a Hickory Town breakfast sandwich at the new High Street on Hudson in the West Village.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Tuesday brushed aside reports of ties between Donald Trump's campaign chairman and a pro-Russia political party in Ukraine, saying the issue doesn't reflect on the GOP presidential candidate. At a Statehouse news conference, the governor, a top Trump backer, also dismissed the idea that the candidate's prediction of a "rigged" election was dangerous, and said that despite Trump's trailing poll numbers, he wasn't worried that Trump's chances of winning in November were dwindling.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University's School of Media and Communication has received a $2 million grant to create an endowed chair in "journalism innovation" named after James B. Steele, a Pulitzer Prize winning investigative reporter formerly with the Inquirer. The university has hired Aron Pilhofer, executive editor of digital for the Guardian (the English publication with a digital edition in the United States) and a former editor of digital strategy for the New York Times, to fill the post. Pilhofer, regarded as a leader in digital strategies, will start in October.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
CLEVELAND - It wasn't the role he had hoped for. But while Gov. Christie didn't address the Republican National Convention as the party's new presidential nominee Tuesday night - or as that nominee's running mate - he might have given the same speech if he were. "As a former federal prosecutor, I welcome the opportunity to hold Hillary Clinton accountable for her performance and her character," said Christie, who previously served as U.S. attorney for New Jersey. He then launched into a speech that would stir one of the stronger reactions of the night from the crowd that had nominated Donald Trump for president earlier inside the Quicken Loans Arena.
NEWS
July 19, 2016
TURKEY HAS always had a little bit of a problem with the truth. For decades, the Turkish government has denied that it executed the first real genocide in modern times when it eliminated the Christian Armenian population that had been living within the territories of the Ottoman Empire. According to Samantha Power in her magisterial book A Problem From Hell , "Beginning in March 1915, [the New York Times] spoke of Turkish 'massacres,' 'slaughter,' and 'atrocities' against the Armenians, relaying accounts by missionaries, Red Cross officials, local religious authorities and survivors of mass executions.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
'My sister was so much more than her final 30 minutes," Bill Genovese laments in a new documentary film, The Witness , about the woman who is arguably the best-known murder victim in New York City history. Kitty Genovese was 28 years old when she was attacked and murdered near her apartment in Kew Gardens, Queens, on March 13, 1964. Ever since, her story has been the stuff of first-year psychology courses and constant study. With her in mind, in 1968, psychologists John Darley and Bibb Latané coined the term bystander effect to refer to situations in which onlookers tend not to help a victim if other witnesses are present.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Thursday announced the nomination of his former chief counsel, Chris Porrino, as New Jersey attorney general, a job that for three years has been filled by officials serving in an acting capacity. At a Statehouse news conference Thursday, Christie said he was "delighted that Chris is back. " Porrino left the administration in July 2015 and took a job as cochair of Lowenstein Sandler L.L.P.'s national litigation practice. He will succeed Robert Lougy as acting attorney general - an interim title before a confirmation hearing.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By John Baer
WHILE READING Sunday's front-page New York Times piece about Donald Trump's "crossing the line" with women he worked with, dated or casually encountered, I thought, heck, this won't hurt him. Then, by Monday, one of the women, former Trump girlfriend Rowanne Brewer Lane, featured in the piece as objectified by Trump, said the Times misrepresented her, and I thought, whoa, the piece actually helps him. How, you might ask? It displays Trump as the field-playing macho stud he's played for decades.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
NEW YORK - Just a few years ago, Philadelphia came into its own as a magnet for ambitious young chefs from around the country who sought their culinary fortunes in a city rich with restaurant opportunity. But the story line has now reversed, as Philadelphia's restaurant stars have begun exporting their brands, especially, at the moment, to Manhattan. These days, New Yorkers can find spicy dandan heaven at a Han Dynasty in the East Village. Or a Hickory Town breakfast sandwich at the new High Street on Hudson in the West Village.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
THE ANNOUNCEMENT by former U.S. Sen. Harris Wofford (D, Pa.) that he would marry again Saturday at age 90, this time to a man 50 years his junior, hit the Web like another naked Kim Kardashian selfie. As someone who once interviewed Wofford, I was as shocked as anyone. The news didn't break the Internet, but the venerable Democrat, who worked with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and helped start the Peace Corps, got people talking. His relationship challenges traditional notions of heterosexuality and of love.
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