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NEWS
October 20, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
On Oct. 12, New York Times editorial writer Adam Cohen penned a hit piece masquerading as a profile of Bobby Jindal, the remarkable Republican gubernatorial candidate in Louisiana. Cohen began by noting that while Jindal's primary night victory celebration was attended by a diverse mix of whites and Indian-Americans, "there was scarcely a black reveler there. " How many "black revelers" were in attendance at Democratic rival Kathleen Blanco's election night gathering Cohen did not see fit to print.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1997 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a newspaper battle brewing in Happy Valley. In one corner is the Centre Daily Times, hometown newspaper of State College, its pages sprinkled with stories from the state's heartland: farming, growth and local government mixed with Little League, church bingo and Penn State football. Full-page ads cost $2,000, the news staff numbers 40 and many of its 25,000 loyal readers don't take kindly to MTV awards splashed across its front page. But can this small, but respectable community newspaper go toe to toe with the mighty newspaper of all newspapers?
BUSINESS
June 11, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The New York Times will buy the company that owns the Boston Globe for $1.1 billion under an agreement approved yesterday by the boards of both companies, the New York paper reported in today's issues. The largest in newspaper history, the sale would end family control at one of the last major independent papers in the country. It was to be announced in today's Globe as well. For now, terms of the sale ensure that the two newspapers will remain separate. According to sources at the Globe, the negotiations included contracts guaranteeing the employment of senior management.
NEWS
November 22, 2005 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's simply not true that Maureen Dowd eats men for breakfast. I know because I had breakfast with her recently at the Four Seasons Hotel in Manhattan, and she didn't even poke me with a fork. Here's what happened: When the waitress came, Dowd ordered a sensible raspberry yogurt. "I'm in the mood for something manly," I said. So I ordered two eggs sunny-side up and a side of corned beef. "That sounds really good," Dowd said. "Can I switch to that, too?" I knew then that Dowd was my kind of woman.
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite a clear sense of unease about the risk to newspapers of becoming the target of future blackmailers, most scholars and editors interviewed yesterday said they thought the Washington Post and New York Times had acted properly in printing the 35,000-word tract to placate the mail-bomber known as the Unabomber. "Every professional instinct within me believes that it was the wrong decision," said Marvin Kalb, the former NBC and CBS reporter who now directs the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't really want to like Anna Quindlen, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist, bestselling novelist, and devoted wife and mother of three whose achievements seem to suggest that women can, indeed, have it all. It doesn't help that Quindlen, 42, recently turned down a shot at a top managerial job at the Times - perhaps, in time, the top job - in order to plunge full time into a promising literary career. Who among us even has such a choice? Where, one can't help wondering, have the rest of us gone wrong?
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
THE ANNOUNCEMENT by former U.S. Sen. Harris Wofford (D, Pa.) that he would marry again Saturday at age 90, this time to a man 50 years his junior, hit the Web like another naked Kim Kardashian selfie. As someone who once interviewed Wofford, I was as shocked as anyone. The news didn't break the Internet, but the venerable Democrat, who worked with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and helped start the Peace Corps, got people talking. His relationship challenges traditional notions of heterosexuality and of love.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
NEW YORK - Just a few years ago, Philadelphia came into its own as a magnet for ambitious young chefs from around the country who sought their culinary fortunes in a city rich with restaurant opportunity. But the story line has now reversed, as Philadelphia's restaurant stars have begun exporting their brands, especially, at the moment, to Manhattan. These days, New Yorkers can find spicy dandan heaven at a Han Dynasty in the East Village. Or a Hickory Town breakfast sandwich at the new High Street on Hudson in the West Village.
NEWS
October 4, 1986
At last we know why our illustrious mayor doesn't know what is going on in Philadelphia. He's off somewhere reading the New York Times. B. L. Lockridge-Bluitt Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | BY MICHAEL ELKIN, For the Daily News
WEST Philadelphia-born and -raised, Colman Domingo makes no pretense of passing as a prince of Bel-Air. No need to; at 43, he's more a poobah of film and stage. And he's got the credits to prove it, from Steven Spielberg's recent, Oscar-winning "Lincoln" to Spike Lee's "Passing Strange," a 2009 film based on a play that Domingo appeared in and won an off-Broadway Obie Award for. You'll also see him this fall in Lee Daniels' "The Butler," about White House butler Eugene Allen.
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NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By John Baer
WHILE READING Sunday's front-page New York Times piece about Donald Trump's "crossing the line" with women he worked with, dated or casually encountered, I thought, heck, this won't hurt him. Then, by Monday, one of the women, former Trump girlfriend Rowanne Brewer Lane, featured in the piece as objectified by Trump, said the Times misrepresented her, and I thought, whoa, the piece actually helps him. How, you might ask? It displays Trump as the field-playing macho stud he's played for decades.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
NEW YORK - Just a few years ago, Philadelphia came into its own as a magnet for ambitious young chefs from around the country who sought their culinary fortunes in a city rich with restaurant opportunity. But the story line has now reversed, as Philadelphia's restaurant stars have begun exporting their brands, especially, at the moment, to Manhattan. These days, New Yorkers can find spicy dandan heaven at a Han Dynasty in the East Village. Or a Hickory Town breakfast sandwich at the new High Street on Hudson in the West Village.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
THE ANNOUNCEMENT by former U.S. Sen. Harris Wofford (D, Pa.) that he would marry again Saturday at age 90, this time to a man 50 years his junior, hit the Web like another naked Kim Kardashian selfie. As someone who once interviewed Wofford, I was as shocked as anyone. The news didn't break the Internet, but the venerable Democrat, who worked with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and helped start the Peace Corps, got people talking. His relationship challenges traditional notions of heterosexuality and of love.
NEWS
April 2, 2016
Republican peculiarities in this political season are so numerous and lurid that insufficient attention is being paid to this: The probable Democratic nominee's principal credential, her service as secretary of state, is undermined by a debacle of remarkable dishonesty. Hillary Clinton's supposedly supreme presidential qualification is not her public prominence, which is derivative from her marriage, or her unremarkable tenure in a similarly derivative Senate seat. Rather, her supposed credential is her foreign policy mastery.
NEWS
March 16, 2016
By Charles Lewis The United States has a noisy and utterly imperfect representational democracy, disorderly and dysfunctional in many ways. But as Founding Father James Madison famously observed, "A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy; or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. " Unfortunately, in terms of a national "right to know" law, it took 144 years for the American people to begin to arm themselves with palpable knowledge about their government.
NEWS
March 15, 2016
ISSUE | VETERANS Charity lost its way I was pleased to learn that investigations of the Wounded Warrior Project by CBS News and the New York Times resulted in the firing of the organization's top two officials ("Wounded Warrior fires execs over spending accusations," Philly.com, Friday) Several months ago, when I received a gift blanket for making a donation, I noticed that it had been made in China. I wrote to the executive offices, suggesting that employing American veterans to make the blankets, rather than outsourcing, would be more in keeping with the organization's goals.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Nick Buchta bounded into the room with a pizza box in one hand and a laptop in the other. He had quite a story, he told the other student editors crammed into an office at the headquarters of the Daily Pennsylvanian: Football coaches from the eight Ivy League universities voted to ban tackling at practice. "I'm the one who told Penn Athletics this is happening," Buchta, 21, the senior sports editor, said recently, his voice rising with excitement. "They didn't know. " Buchta, a senior political science and communication major from Cleveland, said he saw the story in the New York Times and quickly got it confirmed and posted a story to the school newspaper's website.
NEWS
February 13, 2016
By G. Wayne Miller All-electric cars were creating excitement as the 2016 car show season began with the Consumer Electronics Show and, more recently, the Philadelphia Auto Show. With shows to come in Chicago, Toronto, Geneva, Beijing, and New York City, plus many smaller regional exhibitions, battery-powered vehicles will stay in the news. It's an old story, though, dating to the automotive industry's infancy, when electrics competed with steam- and gas-powered vehicles for market share.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITER
Former Gov. Ed Rendell, a close friend of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, told the New York Times over the weekend that he might back his buddy if he runs for president as an independent. The caveat for Rendell, a longtime proponent of Hillary Clinton's bid for the presidency: He would only back Bloomberg if U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont won the Democratic nomination. On Monday, Rendell walked that back a bit while speaking with The Inquirer. "I like Bernie Sanders.
NEWS
December 31, 2015
Robert Spitzer, 83, a psychiatrist who played a leading role in establishing agreed-upon standards to describe mental disorders and eliminating homosexuality's designation as a pathology, died of heart problems Friday in Seattle, said his wife, Janet Williams, a Columbia University professor emerita. Dr. Spitzer's work on several editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or the D.S.M., defined all of the major disorders "so all in the profession could agree on what they were seeing," said Williams, who worked with him on D.S.M.-III, which was published in 1980.
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