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NEWS
January 23, 1987 | By Colman McCarthy
William Shawn, the editor of the New Yorker, was on the line. Reticent- voiced and apologetic for phoning me at home in the evening, he explained the purpose of the call: to ask if I would mind if he suggested a word change or two in the article I had sent to the magazine. If that was acceptable to me, he would order proofs and pass the piece to the fact-checking department where it would be prepared for publication. Then he stopped. The pause continued. My first impulse was to drop the phone and go to the basement to get the stepladder for climbing to the rooftop, for a shout to the neighbors that a boyhood dream had just come true: being published in The New Yorker.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
According to Bud Liebler, Chrysler's maharajah of marketing, "Buyers who are looking for comfort and elegance will recognize New Yorker as an ultimate high-technology luxury sedan. " More likely, they will not recognize the New Yorker as such. More likely, they will realize that the ultimate high-technology luxury sedan isn't made in Detroit for $14,396. It is assembled in Munich and Stuttgart for something on the order of $45,000. In a real way, Liebler's hyperbole symbolizes the New Yorker's problem: It tries to be more than it is. Instead of being content with its real self - a comfortable, mid-price family sedan with a lot of zing in its turbo-charged form - the New Yorker wants to be ever so ritzy.
LIVING
April 20, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John McPhee has a startling revelation to make. "I have never written one word at the New Yorker, except for fixes," the longtime New Yorker staff writer says. He does all his writing at his office at Princeton University where he teaches one course every spring. "I think my ambition to be a writer formed perhaps even before high school," McPhee, an elegant stylist and meticulous researcher, said in a recent interview. "I was under the misapprehension when I was 12 that it looked easy.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | THE INQUIRER STAFF Inquirer staff writer Dan DeLuca contributed to this article. It also contains information from the Associated Press, the Washington Post and Reuters
Tina Brown said good-bye to the New Yorker with hugs, kisses and champagne while publisher S.I. Newhouse Jr. promised to continue her legacy - for now, anyway. "We have a slight editorial problem," he jokingly told the staff Thursday, according to the New York Times. A day earlier, Brown announced she was resigning as the magazine's editor to start a company affiliated with Miramax Films. Giving her a kiss and an embrace, Newhouse said he would make no sudden changes to the mag the British editor has fashioned into a cutting-edge publication.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
It's said that the decades after the Civil War in America produced, in a rising level of prosperity, some of the most powerful and picturesque personalities in our nation's history. That was an era of robber barons and incompetent politicians, to be sure, but also of utopian reformers with dreams for the betterment of mankind. And it was an era of major creative talents in the arts and literature who had to make their mark in Europe before finding patrons on this side of the Atlantic.
SPORTS
March 6, 1993 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The best-of-13-set series for the world championship of court tennis went to the final set yesterday before Wayne Davies, the titleholder since 1987, prevailed again. Davies, pro at the New York Racquet and Tennis Club, withstood a strong finish by challenger Lachlan Deuchar, pro at London's Harbour Club, to win the Open Court Tennis Championship by 7 sets to 6 at the New York club.
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
Do great magazines have to be charitable operations? That's the question hovering over The New Yorker, where brilliant writer David Remnick was just named to succeed editor Tina Brown, who quit to head a new multimedia venture affiliated with Miramax films. Tina - who, like Madonna and Monica, now seems famous enough for a first name to suffice - reigned at the New Yorker as the queen of "buzz. " She assembled a peerless stable of writing talent. She made the proud but staid weekly a force in interpreting breaking news.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a shakeup that stunned Manhattan's publishing world yesterday, Vanity Fair editor-in-chief Tina Brown was tapped to head The New Yorker, the venerable literary and nonfiction weekly. Naming Brown as The New Yorker's editor-in-chief was a move viewed as akin to chosing Madonna to direct the New York City Ballet. The fourth editor-in- chief in The New Yorker's 67-year history, Brown inherits a magazine with one of the country's richest literary histories. It has published James Thurber, E.B. White, James Baldwin, Truman Capote, Lillian Ross, A.J. Liebling, Dorothy Parker, John Hersey, John Cheever and John Updike, as well as the drawings of Charles Addams and George Booth.
LIVING
December 31, 1997 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Happy writers have histories shorter even than happy families," Brendan Gill said in the opening lines of his 1975 best-seller, Here at the New Yorker. "The whole of my professional career can be summed up by saying that I started out at the place where I wanted most to be . . . and with much pleasure and very little labor have remained here ever since. " Gill died Saturday at 83. And after 60 years, he was still a staff writer for the New Yorker. For that matter, the edition of the magazine now on the stands - the Jan. 5 edition - includes a piece by Gill on the New York City skyline.
NEWS
February 20, 1996 | BY FRANCESCA CHAPMAN Daily News wire services, the New York Post, USA Today, the Washington Post and Entertainment Weekly contributed to this report
Roseanne, our favorite TV star who used to live in a trailer park, is finally getting the intellectual props she craves: She's credited as a contributing editor to this week's New Yorker magazine. Of course, that means many of the actual intellectuals associated with the famous mag are up in arms. Two writers, envisioning Roseanne going over their think-pieces with a big red pencil, quit last year when editor Tina Brown announced she was seeking Roseanne's help. But what was Roseanne's actual input?
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Few Philadelphians are as unequivocal in their praise for the city as Frank Steele. What is surprising, however, is that Steele is a native New Yorker, and still lives with his wife, Mary Jo, and three daughters on the "Queens side of the Whitestone Bridge. " "We are in love with Philly," said Steele, a consultant for the New York City school system, citing "the tradition and landmarks, and especially the Reading Terminal Market. " The Steeles' connection to Philadelphia is a condo in the Peninsula building at Waterfront Square that they bought in June 2014.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may be the fact that Atul Gawande is a doctor - a Harvard doctor, yet - that draws readers to his books on our flawed medical system. But he wouldn't make the best-seller lists if he wrote - or thought - like most doctors. This is a guy with one of those renaissance-man resum├ęs that makes even quite accomplished people look like slackers. Stanford undergrad. Rhodes scholar studying philosophy. Health-care adviser to President Bill Clinton. Medical degree and master's in public health from Harvard.
NEWS
February 20, 2015
IN MAGIC, the act of turning an object into a completely different thing is known as "transformation. " But recently, it was conjurer Jeff Hobson who was altered in a significant way. Hobson is one of seven wizards who on Tuesday begin a six-day, eight-performance run in "The Illusionists" at the Academy of Music. They're on a national tour, following a successful end-of-2014 Broadway run. According to the veteran entertainer, his time in the Big Apple made him see the city in an entirely new light.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Suffering Chinese prisoners. Art in social politics. Fraudulent, self-aggrandizing claims by performers like Mike Daisy. All these flammable topics are right up InterAct Theatre Company's alley, right? They're the company that specializes in righteous indignation and intentional provocation. Well, prepare to be outfoxed by one of the smartest, most cynical, heart-wrenching, brain-teasing comedies I've seen in a long while, Christopher Chen's Caught , in a brilliant InterAct premiere.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
As though going through a Rolodex, Roz Chast cycles through some of the reasons she had such a complicated, difficult relationship with her parents. "They both grew up poor. They were born in 1912, so they graduated college into the Depression. Their experiences were . . . just awful," said the New Yorker cartoonist, who delves into that troubled relationship in her graphic memoir, Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? , published Tuesday by Bloomsbury. Chast, 59, whose work is acclaimed for its wry humor and off-kilter style, will discuss the book at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library at 7:30 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
Pennsylvania's predilection for hoagies and cheesesteaks speaks to innate frugality. It took a New Yorker to figure out how to spend serious money on a sandwich. Unfortunately, former Pennsylvania Health Secretary Eli Avila, a New York transplant that didn't take, effectively spent our money - $75,000 worth, The Inquirer reported Wednesday - in his quest for a sandwich that matched his supposed station. That was the cost of settling his dispute with a Harrisburg eatery long after the ex-secretary returned north.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013
Hannah Arendt - Barbara Sukowa portrays the writer and philosopher who covered the 1961 trial of Adolf Eichmann for the New Yorker in this period drama. Also starring Janet McTeer as Arendt's friend Mary McCarthy. (No MPAA rating, Ritz Bourse)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank O'Hara (1926-1966): New Yorker, gay man, poet. Billie Holiday (1915-1959): Philly-born New Yorker, black woman, singer. Both famous. Both, because of what they were, relegated to the margins. That irony - that two of America's great artists could speak so centrally yet be denied centrality - informs Azuka Theatre's world premiere of Everyone and I , a play by Philadelphia poet Elizabeth Scanlon. It runs Thursday through April 7 at Hamilton Garden at the Kimmel Center, as part of the 2013 Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts.
SPORTS
August 30, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
As proof that no detail is too small to avoid scrutiny at Penn State these days, the school's marching band will not be playing the unctuous Neil Diamond classic, "Sweet Caroline" during football games this season. This deletion from the playlist, first reported by the Altoona Mirror, comes about allegedly because the lyric, "Hands/ Holding hands/ Reaching out/ Touching me/ Touching you," might be for some a skeevy reminder of the whole Jerry Sandusky saga that Penn State would rather not have blaring across the stadium.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
It looks to be a jam packed night in the Philadelphia area - in more ways than one. Three area venues will rock with sports and music at about the same time tonight, meaning the tail-end of rush hour could be significantly impacted. First, the Phillies take on the New York Mets at 7:05 p.m. at Citizens Bank Park. Though the Phillies ended their 257 consecutive games sellout streak in the beginning of August, attendance is still high at most games, and could hover around 45,000 tonight - give or take a few thousand.
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