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NEWS
January 23, 1987 | By Colman McCarthy
William Shawn, the editor of the New Yorker, was on the line. Reticent- voiced and apologetic for phoning me at home in the evening, he explained the purpose of the call: to ask if I would mind if he suggested a word change or two in the article I had sent to the magazine. If that was acceptable to me, he would order proofs and pass the piece to the fact-checking department where it would be prepared for publication. Then he stopped. The pause continued. My first impulse was to drop the phone and go to the basement to get the stepladder for climbing to the rooftop, for a shout to the neighbors that a boyhood dream had just come true: being published in The New Yorker.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
According to Bud Liebler, Chrysler's maharajah of marketing, "Buyers who are looking for comfort and elegance will recognize New Yorker as an ultimate high-technology luxury sedan. " More likely, they will not recognize the New Yorker as such. More likely, they will realize that the ultimate high-technology luxury sedan isn't made in Detroit for $14,396. It is assembled in Munich and Stuttgart for something on the order of $45,000. In a real way, Liebler's hyperbole symbolizes the New Yorker's problem: It tries to be more than it is. Instead of being content with its real self - a comfortable, mid-price family sedan with a lot of zing in its turbo-charged form - the New Yorker wants to be ever so ritzy.
LIVING
April 20, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John McPhee has a startling revelation to make. "I have never written one word at the New Yorker, except for fixes," the longtime New Yorker staff writer says. He does all his writing at his office at Princeton University where he teaches one course every spring. "I think my ambition to be a writer formed perhaps even before high school," McPhee, an elegant stylist and meticulous researcher, said in a recent interview. "I was under the misapprehension when I was 12 that it looked easy.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | THE INQUIRER STAFF Inquirer staff writer Dan DeLuca contributed to this article. It also contains information from the Associated Press, the Washington Post and Reuters
Tina Brown said good-bye to the New Yorker with hugs, kisses and champagne while publisher S.I. Newhouse Jr. promised to continue her legacy - for now, anyway. "We have a slight editorial problem," he jokingly told the staff Thursday, according to the New York Times. A day earlier, Brown announced she was resigning as the magazine's editor to start a company affiliated with Miramax Films. Giving her a kiss and an embrace, Newhouse said he would make no sudden changes to the mag the British editor has fashioned into a cutting-edge publication.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
It's said that the decades after the Civil War in America produced, in a rising level of prosperity, some of the most powerful and picturesque personalities in our nation's history. That was an era of robber barons and incompetent politicians, to be sure, but also of utopian reformers with dreams for the betterment of mankind. And it was an era of major creative talents in the arts and literature who had to make their mark in Europe before finding patrons on this side of the Atlantic.
SPORTS
March 6, 1993 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The best-of-13-set series for the world championship of court tennis went to the final set yesterday before Wayne Davies, the titleholder since 1987, prevailed again. Davies, pro at the New York Racquet and Tennis Club, withstood a strong finish by challenger Lachlan Deuchar, pro at London's Harbour Club, to win the Open Court Tennis Championship by 7 sets to 6 at the New York club.
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
Do great magazines have to be charitable operations? That's the question hovering over The New Yorker, where brilliant writer David Remnick was just named to succeed editor Tina Brown, who quit to head a new multimedia venture affiliated with Miramax films. Tina - who, like Madonna and Monica, now seems famous enough for a first name to suffice - reigned at the New Yorker as the queen of "buzz. " She assembled a peerless stable of writing talent. She made the proud but staid weekly a force in interpreting breaking news.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a shakeup that stunned Manhattan's publishing world yesterday, Vanity Fair editor-in-chief Tina Brown was tapped to head The New Yorker, the venerable literary and nonfiction weekly. Naming Brown as The New Yorker's editor-in-chief was a move viewed as akin to chosing Madonna to direct the New York City Ballet. The fourth editor-in- chief in The New Yorker's 67-year history, Brown inherits a magazine with one of the country's richest literary histories. It has published James Thurber, E.B. White, James Baldwin, Truman Capote, Lillian Ross, A.J. Liebling, Dorothy Parker, John Hersey, John Cheever and John Updike, as well as the drawings of Charles Addams and George Booth.
LIVING
December 31, 1997 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Happy writers have histories shorter even than happy families," Brendan Gill said in the opening lines of his 1975 best-seller, Here at the New Yorker. "The whole of my professional career can be summed up by saying that I started out at the place where I wanted most to be . . . and with much pleasure and very little labor have remained here ever since. " Gill died Saturday at 83. And after 60 years, he was still a staff writer for the New Yorker. For that matter, the edition of the magazine now on the stands - the Jan. 5 edition - includes a piece by Gill on the New York City skyline.
NEWS
February 20, 1996 | BY FRANCESCA CHAPMAN Daily News wire services, the New York Post, USA Today, the Washington Post and Entertainment Weekly contributed to this report
Roseanne, our favorite TV star who used to live in a trailer park, is finally getting the intellectual props she craves: She's credited as a contributing editor to this week's New Yorker magazine. Of course, that means many of the actual intellectuals associated with the famous mag are up in arms. Two writers, envisioning Roseanne going over their think-pieces with a big red pencil, quit last year when editor Tina Brown announced she was seeking Roseanne's help. But what was Roseanne's actual input?
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NEWS
May 10, 2016
IF THERE were a place that you could call Ground Zero in the wars over climate change, it might be the Canadian province of Alberta. In the latest chapter in humankind's opioid-like addiction to fossil fuels, energy companies have been extracting dense, dirty oil from that region's deposits of tar sands -- a kind of fuel that is wasteful to extract and emits more carbon pollution when it's finally burned. The added burden of the tar sands oil on our looming global-warming crisis caused U.S. activists to raise a tremendous stink over the Keystone XL pipeline, which would have shipped this dirty fuel right through the American Heartland on its way to Gulf Coast ports and then to foreign markets like China.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
Doug Banks Phila.-born radio host, 57 Doug Banks, 57, a Philadelphia native and nationally syndicated radio host, died Monday of complications from diabetes. Mr. Banks cohosted the news feature show  190 North  for 10 years on WLS-TV, an ABC affiliate in Chicago. He was raised in Michigan and began his career at his Detroit high school radio station, when he was noticed and given a late-night weekend show by WDRQ-FM. Mr. Banks later worked at radio stations in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Las Vegas.
SPORTS
February 6, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
Sunday's 50th Super Bowl is expected to attract more than 120 million American TV viewers. To satisfy such an enormous and demanding audience, CBS will employ 70 cameras and 250 microphones to capture, scrutinize and, if necessary, replay virtually everything that happens at Levi's Stadium. The year's most anticipated football telecast, Super Bowl 50 will be the most sophisticated ever, the 2016 version of a constantly evolving species that emerged from the primordial ooze 77 years ago. The first televised NFL game happened on Oct. 22, 1939, a meaningless matchup of two bad teams, the Eagles and Dodgers, at Brooklyn's Ebbets Field.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Cartoonist Roz Chast always viewed her work as strongly reflecting her upbringing in a Jewish New York family. After the release of her graphic memoir, Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? - which recounts her struggle to deal with her parents' final years - she came to realize that her experience was surprisingly universal. "I've gotten so many letters from people who live in all kinds of different places," Chast said. "Someone from rural Washington will say, 'My father was a farmer and a Baptist, but he was just like your dad.' So maybe there are things that we might think of as Jewish or New York-centric, but they're less so than we think.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
It matters more than a little that two of Philadelphia's best top cops in recent memory - John Timoney and Charles Ramsey - were both outsiders. It matters even more that mayoral candidates Melissa Murray Bailey and Jim Kenney say they aren't inclined to consider outside candidates to replace Ramsey, who has announced his retirement. Bailey has even named a favorite for the post, First Deputy Commissioner Richard Ross. Ross is certainly well qualified for the job, but that doesn't justify an anointment.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Few Philadelphians are as unequivocal in their praise for the city as Frank Steele. What is surprising, however, is that Steele is a native New Yorker, and still lives with his wife, Mary Jo, and three daughters on the "Queens side of the Whitestone Bridge. " "We are in love with Philly," said Steele, a consultant for the New York City school system, citing "the tradition and landmarks, and especially the Reading Terminal Market. " The Steeles' connection to Philadelphia is a condo in the Peninsula building at Waterfront Square that they bought in June 2014.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may be the fact that Atul Gawande is a doctor - a Harvard doctor, yet - that draws readers to his books on our flawed medical system. But he wouldn't make the best-seller lists if he wrote - or thought - like most doctors. This is a guy with one of those renaissance-man resumés that makes even quite accomplished people look like slackers. Stanford undergrad. Rhodes scholar studying philosophy. Health-care adviser to President Bill Clinton. Medical degree and master's in public health from Harvard.
NEWS
February 20, 2015
IN MAGIC, the act of turning an object into a completely different thing is known as "transformation. " But recently, it was conjurer Jeff Hobson who was altered in a significant way. Hobson is one of seven wizards who on Tuesday begin a six-day, eight-performance run in "The Illusionists" at the Academy of Music. They're on a national tour, following a successful end-of-2014 Broadway run. According to the veteran entertainer, his time in the Big Apple made him see the city in an entirely new light.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Suffering Chinese prisoners. Art in social politics. Fraudulent, self-aggrandizing claims by performers like Mike Daisy. All these flammable topics are right up InterAct Theatre Company's alley, right? They're the company that specializes in righteous indignation and intentional provocation. Well, prepare to be outfoxed by one of the smartest, most cynical, heart-wrenching, brain-teasing comedies I've seen in a long while, Christopher Chen's Caught , in a brilliant InterAct premiere.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
As though going through a Rolodex, Roz Chast cycles through some of the reasons she had such a complicated, difficult relationship with her parents. "They both grew up poor. They were born in 1912, so they graduated college into the Depression. Their experiences were . . . just awful," said the New Yorker cartoonist, who delves into that troubled relationship in her graphic memoir, Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? , published Tuesday by Bloomsbury. Chast, 59, whose work is acclaimed for its wry humor and off-kilter style, will discuss the book at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library at 7:30 p.m. Monday.
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