FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Mayor-elect Sharpe James presented a sweeping prescription for change in Newark yesterday, promising safe and clean streets and more jobs in a city that has never fully shaken its down-and-out image. James, 50, a four-term city councilman, was the center of attention inside the patched, ornate City Hall after turning Mayor Kenneth A. Gibson out of the office he has held since 1970. Dynamic in speech and optimistic on tone, James offered a clear stylistic contrast to the businesslike and taciturn Gibson.
NEWS
July 16, 2012
Two shootings in Newark early Sunday have left two men dead and another wounded. Authorities say there is no link between the shootings, but motives have not been determined. Acting Essex County Prosecutor Carolyn Murray said the first shooting occurred shortly before 1 a.m. on Harding Terrace. Police responded to reports of shots fired and found Kendal Spear, 21, and another man had been wounded. Spear later died at a hospital, while the other unidentified 21-year-old man was being treated for wounds that were not considered life-threatening.
NEWS
May 17, 1986 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
A funny thing happened in Newark this week. Kenneth A. Gibson, the man who had been mayor of New Jersey's largest city for 16 years, was defeated by City Councilman Sharpe James. Gibson had succeeded Hugh Addonizio, a high school and college football hero, U.S. congressman and thief. Gibson promised to reduce corruption and get the city back on track. To a large extent, he lived up to his promise. But Ken Gibson forgot about the people. He forgot that because of the city's history, they were suffering from a lack of self-esteem and a persistently poor image.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
NEWARK, N.J. - On one level, the race to succeed U.S. Sen. Cory Booker as mayor of New Jersey's largest city is a local political contest with the candidates debating issues familiar to urban America: intractable violent crime, a struggling school district challenged by charter schools, a perpetual battle to attract development and create jobs. Behind the scenes, though, the May 13 nonpartisan election is shaping up as a battleground for a bigger prize: control of Essex County and, in turn, an edge in a possible Democratic primary for the next gubernatorial election.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2010
"I'm gratified that a gaming venue has opened in Philadelphia. " "Well, Newark, is really just because I believe in these guys, right?" "I can promise you, this is my life so I know it's not that dramatic. " "You don't get to sit on the bench in corporate life. You're either working or you're gone. " "They can't say unequivocally that we're going into another recession, but they certainly can't promise a rapid recovery. They're in this limbo state. " "It's a pothole, not a ditch.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By David Porter, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - Gov. Christie flaunted his bipartisan support Tuesday, taking a walking tour in Newark flanked by two Democratic county officials who have crossed party lines to endorse him in his reelection bid. Accompanying Christie through the Ironbound section, known for its Portuguese influence and numerous restaurants, were Essex County Executive Joseph DiVincenzo and longtime county Sheriff Armando Fontoura. DiVincenzo is the highest-profile Democrat to endorse Christie.
NEWS
May 11, 2006 | By Mark J. Bonamo
In today's Newark, political deals are no longer made in the back room. They are made in the basement. Below the Ivy Hill projects in New Jersey's largest city, two rising young politicians were courting the local Muslim population before Tuesday's nationally watched municipal elections. Cory Booker, 37, candidate for mayor, and Ron Rice Jr., 38, his slate mate for City Council in this neighborhood, sat next to a pale green curtain separating men from women in the makeshift mosque.
NEWS
November 19, 2011 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
NEWARK - About 30 protesters arrived Friday afternoon to begin an Occupy Newark protest and were greeted by the city's police chief. Chief Sheila Coley, who awaited the group at Military Park across from the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, welcomed the activists by saying they had a right to protest nonviolently. "We're here to make sure you're safe," Coley said. The protesters spoke in the call-and-repeat form of communication, called "the people's mic," developed by Occupy groups around the country that are prohibited from using bullhorns.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Mayor Cory Booker lives in two political worlds. In one world, at City Hall in Newark, N.J. Booker twice casts a controversial tie-breaking vote to maneuver an ally onto the City Council, sparking a near-riot with council members yelling, "Shame on you!" A court ultimately invalidates the vote, leaving the council evenly split. In the other world, outside Newark, Booker is praised as an inspiration and courted to challenge Republican Gov. Christie in 2013. TV interviewers even ask him what happens after he becomes governor or U.S. senator: Will he run for president?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2006 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services and Baird Jones contributed to this report
QUEEN Latifah returned to her hometown of Newark, N.J., Wednesday night to host a premiere of her latest movie, "Last Holiday. " As she walked along a red carpet in the middle of a parking lot, Latifah said she was happy to be back home. "It just means I don't have to go far to get home from the premiere," said Latifah, who has homes in New Jersey and Los Angeles. "My whole family is here, so it's wonderful. I can celebrate with Jersey for a change. " Mayor Sharpe James gushed about the Newark premiere.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 23, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cars, cars, parked everywhere in South Philadelphia. On expansive lots below the Walt Whitman Bridge, on parcels at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. On Norfolk Southern Corp. rail land, and along the old Mustin military airfield now part of 200 acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard. Since August 2010, when Hyundai Motor Co. and Kia Motors Corp. moved their vehicle-import business from Baltimore and Newark, N.J., ports to Philadelphia's waterfront, the number of shiny Hyundai Sonatas and Kia Sorentos rolling off ships has risen from 127,406 in 2011 to 143,258 in 2012 and 151,296 last year.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
NEWARK, N.J. - A federal judge here on Tuesday denied a motion by Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) to move his corruption trial from New Jersey to Washington. U.S. District Judge William H. Walls rejected almost all of Menendez's arguments in favor of holding the trial in Washington and said a Newark trial would be more convenient to Menendez's constituents. "Justice's workings, such as judicial proceedings, should be readily transparent when possible," Walls said in reading his opinion from the bench.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A new organization backed by President Obama has turned to Mayor Nutter and Sen. Cory A. Booker (D., N.J.) for support as it aims to help young minority men thrive, and perhaps shape the president's legacy after he leaves office. Booker and Nutter are among a star-studded list of board members or advisers to My Brother's Keeper Alliance, which has spun off from an Obama initiative and figures to play a major role in the president's plans after he leaves office. The group, Obama said, will work to close "opportunity gaps" that confront minority men born into poor communities, leaving them feeling that "no matter how hard they try, they may never achieve their dreams.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Jenny DeHuff, Daily News Staff Writer
For Keshia Knight Pulliam, posing for the camera began at the age of 9 months, when she appeared in an ad for Johnson & Johnson baby products. From there, she was featured in more TV commercials, then "Sesame Street," then made her feature-film debut in "The Last Dragon," in 1985. At age 5, she became the youngest person ever to be nominated for an Emmy, for playing the part of Rudy Huxtable on "The Cosby Show. " On May 9 and 10, Philadelphians will be able to meet and greet the former child star for the first time at Wizard World Comic Con (May 7 through 10)
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Jonathan Tamari, Melanie Burney, and Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writers
The four sons of Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife raised new questions Monday about their parents' death, and alleged that investigators botched the case from the beginning. In the latest round in a mounting public campaign seeking to prove that their parents were murdered, they released a letter to Somerset County Prosecutor Geoffrey D. Soriano accusing his office of ignoring evidence and hastily determining that the deaths were a murder-suicide. "All we want is the answers to what happened to our parents," one of the sons, Mark, said Monday during an interview at his Newark, N.J., law office.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
NEWARK, N.J. - Mark Sheridan was celebrating his 12th wedding anniversary the day his parents died. He was at a luxury hotel on New York's Upper East Side, packing up, when he got a call from his brother, Matt. Their parents' home was on fire. It was about 6:45 a.m. Sept. 28, 2014. By the time Sheridan and his wife got into their car to drive to the scene, another call came in: John P. Sheridan Jr., chief executive of Cooper Health Systems, and his wife, Joyce, were dead. Mark, his three brothers, and the rest of his family were just starting a saga that has included a six-month investigation, a contentious dispute with Somerset County Prosecutor Geoffrey Soriano, and now, a threat of a lawsuit to overturn the county's finding that John Sheridan stabbed his wife to death and then took his own life by slashing himself and setting their bedroom on fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2015
YOU'VE PROBABLY never heard of Rob Peace, but you might have. Peace was supposed to have done really big things with his life. The son of a single mother and a dad jailed for murder, he grew up in a low-income neighborhood in Newark, N.J., during the height of that city's crack-fueled drug wars. His mother worked in a hospital cafeteria and scrimped to get him into a private high school, where he excelled, earning straight A's. After graduating at the top of his class, Peace enrolled at Yale University on a full scholarship paid by a wealthy benefactor, who told him, "You can go to college wherever you want.
SPORTS
March 17, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
They had the lead in the fourth quarter of the state championship game. Again. They missed some key free throws and rushed a couple of shots from the floor. Again. They lost to Newark Tech in the Group 2 final. Again. "Last year it was there and they stole it," Camden coach John Valore said. "This year it was there and they stole it. " History repeated itself in frustrating fashion Sunday for the Camden High School boys' basketball team in a 57-51 loss to Newark Tech in the Group 2 title game at the Rutgers Athletic Center.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Sharpe James, the former mayor of Newark and New Jersey state senator, violated campaign-finance laws when he used tens of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions to pay legal fees in response to a 2006-07 federal criminal investigation, a state appeals court affirmed Friday. James, a Democrat who served as mayor from 1986 to 2006 and as a senator from 1999 to 2008, was indicted in July 2007 by a federal grand jury on charges of conspiracy, embezzlement, and fraud. Accused of using city-issued credit cards to fund personal vacations and using his power to sell city land to a friend in a sweetheart deal, he was convicted in 2008 and sentenced to 27 months in federal prison.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
When Ted Spiker was creating headlines for the chapters of his book Down Size , one suggestion he made was "hippo-crite. " "I've always had a problem up and down with weight issues, but I have all this background in writing about health and fitness," he said. "I was writing about this stuff, then struggling with it. " "Hippo-crite" didn't make the final cut, but Spiker, a Newark, Del., native who is an associate professor and interim chair in the department of journalism at the University of Florida, lays it all out - his struggles, triumphs, and frustrations, especially around running - in Down Size . It's a mix of personal experience, science, psychology, and what other people have done not necessarily to get into model-worthy shape but to take control of their bodies and their lives.
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