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Newbery Medal

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NEWS
January 29, 1992 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, the New York Post, the New York Daily News and USA Today
Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, who has written more than 60 children's books over a 26-year career, has been named winner of this year's Newbery Medal, the kiddie-lit Pulitzer Prize. The American Library Association gave her the medal for Shiloh, a tale about an 11-year-old boy dealing with questions of honesty and commitment after he finds a stray dog owned by an abusive owner. The Caldecott Medal, given for achievement in picture books for children, went to illustrator David Wiesner for Tuesday, about flying frogs moving through a swamp to a small town.
LIVING
February 19, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Post, New York Daily News, USA Today and Star
E.L. Konigsburg won this year's Newbery Medal for best kids' lit for her book The View From Saturday, a comic novel about a sixth-grade academic bowl team and their paraplegic coach. The Caldecott Medal for an illustrated book went to David Wisniewski, for Golem, about a rabbi in 16th-century Prague who brings to life a clay giant to defend Jews. It was the second Newbery for Konigsburg, who also won in 1968 for her book From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.
NEWS
January 14, 2004 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kate DiCamillo credits a friend's 8-year-old son for inspiring her latest book. He asked her to write a story about a hero with large ears. She came up with a story about a mouse with big ears and a heart of gold. On Monday, The Tale of Despereaux, illustrated by Timothy Basil Ering, was awarded the 2004 Newbery Medal, the top children's literature prize, by the Association for Library Service to Children. DiCamillo, 39, was born in Merion but moved to Florida with her family when she was 5. She worked at "all kinds of dead-end jobs that make mothers worry" before buckling down at age 29 to write.
LIVING
February 2, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Louis Sachar, whose innovative book Holes tells the story of a bad-luck inmate assigned to dig one deep hole every day, and Mary Azarian, illustrator of Snowflake Bentley, about a boy who loves snow, have won the 1999 Newbery and Caldecott Medals, respectively, the most prestigious awards in children's literature. The awards were announced yesterday, along with a bevy of other prize winners, by the American Library Association, which is holding its midwinter meeting at the Convention Center until tomorrow.
LIVING
May 18, 1997 | By Ann Waldron, FOR THE INQUIRER
Jerry Spinelli, author of 17 books for kids and winner of the 1991 Newbery Medal, the country's most prestigious prize for young people's books, does not sit down to write for children. "I write about kids," he said. "I don't write for kids. " Spinelli decided to be a writer when he realized he couldn't hit a curve ball. He wrote a poem about a historic victory of Norristown High School over Lower Merion and was delighted when it ran in the Norristown Times-Herald sports pages under the headline, "Student Waxes Poetic.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marguerite Lofft de Angeli was one of the notable children's authors and illustrators of the 20th century. The longtime resident of Montgomery County, who found much of her inspiration in this region, also was among the first children's writers to explore the culture and problems of minority children. "A nice young man [her husband, John de Angeli] was able to convince me that no career could be as satisfying as being married and raising a family," de Angeli said in a 1982 interview published in Pennsylvania Folklife magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The following contemporary children's books are due to get the film treatment: BABE: THE GALLANT PIG. Dick King-Smith's novel Babe: The Gallant Pig - which began life in England as The Sheep Pig in 1983 - has yielded a nearly perfect movie from Universal, due out tomorrow. The live-action film, scripted and produced by Mad Max director George Miller, is the charming tale of a pig who escapes becoming Christmas dinner by developing a most unusual talent. HAROLD AND THE PURPLE CRAYON.
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By MARK FRANEK
THINK OF A word that rhymes with "totem" that helps describe the male genitalia, and you'll know the word that caused a ruckus for Susan Patron, author of "The Higher Power of Lucky," winner of this year's prestigious Newbery Medal for best children's novel. Most elementary and middle-school libraries order at least one copy of the Newbery book, and the winning novel is often taught or read aloud. But the word in question has resulted in the boycotting of "Lucky" by school libraries in several states, and more are sure to follow.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
Although Valentine's Day is observed today, the love fete was celebrated widely last weekend, from the fifth annual American Heart Association Gala Dinner in Daylesford to the first annual League of Women Voters Valentine's Dance in Radnor Township. The league dance, held at "The Willows" on Saturday night, was attended by more than 100 friends and members. The rooms were decorated with helium- filled white, pink and red balloons, with paper hearts dangling from foil steamers. Attending the event, which raised more than $1,200 for the league's projects, were Vikki Tsukahara, Radnor, president of the Radnor league, who attended with her husband, Ted; Peggy and Sandy Beard, Lois and Barry Hamilton, Julie and Dick Falcone, Lydia and Jim Roberts, Linda Lee, Mary and John Lord, Rita and George Freeland, all from St. Davids; Bill Siple, Wayne, and Lindsay and Jim Davis, Villanova.
NEWS
May 20, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lloyd Alexander, 83, one of the best-known authors of fantasy, adventure and coming-of-age novels of the last several decades, died of cancer Thursday at home in Drexel Hill. Mr. Alexander wrote more than 40 books, and was compared to such writers of fantasy literature as J.R.R. Tolkien. Mr. Alexander won a 1971 National Book Award for The Marvelous Misadventures of Sebastian, about a princess saved by a fiddler in the 19th century; a 1982 American Book Award for Westmark, the debut novel in a trilogy of a printer's apprentice caught up in political intrigue; a 1969 Newbery Medal for the fifth and final book in his Chronicles of Prydain series, inspired by Welsh mythology; several Parents Choice Award winners; the Pennbook Lifetime Achievement Award by the Free Library of Philadelphia in 1991; and several international awards.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2012 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
This time, Christopher Paul Curtis heard a different kind of voice. The prizewinning children's author writes his books by thinking up characters and listening as they tell him their stories. Until now, those voices have been male, and they've helped Curtis win the Newbery Medal for children's literature, the Coretta Scott King Author Award, for outstanding African American authors and illustrators, and enough other honors and citations to keep a frame shop busy for a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - This year's winners of the top prizes in children's literature were honored for stories of resilience over the most everyday troubles: a boy grounded by his parents, a dog that loses its favorite toy. Jack Gantos' Dead End in Norvelt won the John Newbery Medal for the best children's book of 2011, and Chris Raschka's A Ball for Daisy won the Randolph Caldecott award for best illustration. The prizes were announced yesterday by the American Library Association during its midwinter meeting in Dallas.
NEWS
October 19, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ray Lincoln, 89, formerly of Elkins Park, a literary agent whose aggressive advocacy for her clients created best-selling authors, died of heart failure Oct. 7 at the Quadrangle in Haverford. Mrs. Lincoln became a literary agent in the early 1970s after a career with J.B. Lippincott, a publishing company in Philadelphia. She encouraged authors in whom she saw talent even when they were about to give up writing, and cherished their friendships, said her son, Joseph. Among her clients were Barbara Robinson, whose books for young people include The Best Christmas Pageant Ever; Willard S. Randall, author of biographies of Thomas Jefferson and Benedict Arnold; Jerry Spinelli, author of more than a dozen books for young readers; and Spinelli's wife, Eileen, a children's author.
NEWS
May 20, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lloyd Alexander, 83, one of the best-known authors of fantasy, adventure and coming-of-age novels of the last several decades, died of cancer Thursday at home in Drexel Hill. Mr. Alexander wrote more than 40 books, and was compared to such writers of fantasy literature as J.R.R. Tolkien. Mr. Alexander won a 1971 National Book Award for The Marvelous Misadventures of Sebastian, about a princess saved by a fiddler in the 19th century; a 1982 American Book Award for Westmark, the debut novel in a trilogy of a printer's apprentice caught up in political intrigue; a 1969 Newbery Medal for the fifth and final book in his Chronicles of Prydain series, inspired by Welsh mythology; several Parents Choice Award winners; the Pennbook Lifetime Achievement Award by the Free Library of Philadelphia in 1991; and several international awards.
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By MARK FRANEK
THINK OF A word that rhymes with "totem" that helps describe the male genitalia, and you'll know the word that caused a ruckus for Susan Patron, author of "The Higher Power of Lucky," winner of this year's prestigious Newbery Medal for best children's novel. Most elementary and middle-school libraries order at least one copy of the Newbery book, and the winning novel is often taught or read aloud. But the word in question has resulted in the boycotting of "Lucky" by school libraries in several states, and more are sure to follow.
NEWS
January 14, 2004 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kate DiCamillo credits a friend's 8-year-old son for inspiring her latest book. He asked her to write a story about a hero with large ears. She came up with a story about a mouse with big ears and a heart of gold. On Monday, The Tale of Despereaux, illustrated by Timothy Basil Ering, was awarded the 2004 Newbery Medal, the top children's literature prize, by the Association for Library Service to Children. DiCamillo, 39, was born in Merion but moved to Florida with her family when she was 5. She worked at "all kinds of dead-end jobs that make mothers worry" before buckling down at age 29 to write.
NEWS
November 23, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
While teaching at Roberto Clemente Middle School in Philadelphia, Jane Hileman realized that the "achievement gap" in educational performance between rich and poor kids had nothing to do with the children themselves. "The problem was," she reasoned, "they weren't reading at home. What we need to do is change the academic lifestyle of these kids and their families. " Hileman, who lives in Ardmore, came up with a solution: encourage reading from birth and make it easy for the children to read an hour every day. "We want them to read 30 minutes at home and 30 minutes at school," she said.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marguerite Lofft de Angeli was one of the notable children's authors and illustrators of the 20th century. The longtime resident of Montgomery County, who found much of her inspiration in this region, also was among the first children's writers to explore the culture and problems of minority children. "A nice young man [her husband, John de Angeli] was able to convince me that no career could be as satisfying as being married and raising a family," de Angeli said in a 1982 interview published in Pennsylvania Folklife magazine.
LIVING
February 2, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Louis Sachar, whose innovative book Holes tells the story of a bad-luck inmate assigned to dig one deep hole every day, and Mary Azarian, illustrator of Snowflake Bentley, about a boy who loves snow, have won the 1999 Newbery and Caldecott Medals, respectively, the most prestigious awards in children's literature. The awards were announced yesterday, along with a bevy of other prize winners, by the American Library Association, which is holding its midwinter meeting at the Convention Center until tomorrow.
LIVING
May 18, 1997 | By Ann Waldron, FOR THE INQUIRER
Jerry Spinelli, author of 17 books for kids and winner of the 1991 Newbery Medal, the country's most prestigious prize for young people's books, does not sit down to write for children. "I write about kids," he said. "I don't write for kids. " Spinelli decided to be a writer when he realized he couldn't hit a curve ball. He wrote a poem about a historic victory of Norristown High School over Lower Merion and was delighted when it ran in the Norristown Times-Herald sports pages under the headline, "Student Waxes Poetic.
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