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Newborns

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LIVING
June 10, 1996 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Few women are aware that bacteria they commonly harbor in their bodies is the chief cause of life-threatening infection and death in newborns. Or that the devastating infections can be avoided. But that's about to change. Federal authorities last week issued guidelines for screening and treating pregnant women for Group B streptococcus to prevent infection of their babies during delivery. "The infections are so tragic because the pregnancy and delivery can go fine and then, a couple hours after delivery, the babies get very sick," said Anne Schuchat, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who helped develop the guidelines.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania has joined most states in requiring that newborns have their blood oxygen levels measured - a simple test that allows doctors to catch rare heart defects missed during prenatal screening. The test, known as pulse oximetry, consists of placing a small sensor on the infant's foot. It is common practice at birthing hospitals, but was not mandated in Pennsylvania. On Wednesday, Gov. Corbett signed the requirement, which takes effect in 90 days. Physicians say the test can detect problems while newborns are still in the hospital, in case they need surgery.
NEWS
September 27, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
During the past year, 23 Philadelphia children under age 4 developed AIDS, representing an alarming increase of a third over the previous year's pediatric AIDS cases. Each of the 23 cases was transmitted by a mother infected with HIV, the AIDS virus. Since 1981, 89 children under age 4 have been diagnosed with AIDS. The local explosion in cases contradicts a study by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released today that finds a "leveling" nationwide in the number of HIV-infected newborns since 1990.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Armed with a $170,710 federal grant, the state Health Department announced yesterday that it would begin testing all babies born in Philadelphia for sickle cell anemia and expand testing statewide next year. Starting June 1, newborns in Philadelphia will be tested for sickle cell in addition to hypothyroidism and phenylketonuria, two potentially serious disorders for which babies are already tested. Sickle cell anemia is a blood disorder that not only causes anemia, or weakness, but also can lead to blocked blood vessels, infections and other complications.
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
Somewhere out there is a girl named "Bong" and a boy named "Porsche. " There are infants somewhere in Pennsylvania named "Rayon," "Cosmo" and "Knowledge. " There is even, if you can believe it, a baby girl named "Genie" and a baby boy named "Aladdin. " Those are among the more eye-grabbing names given newborns in the state last year, according to the Department of Health. The agency maintains a sort of head count of what's happening in the name game from year to year.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two Bucks County hospitals recently added services for mothers and newborns. Medical College Hospital's Bucks County Campus in Warminster opened a 12- room maternity suite June 7. Each expectant mother is assigned a room where she goes through labor and delivery. After the birth, the mother remains in that room and has the option of keeping her baby with her. Fathers are invited to stay overnight and siblings are allowed to visit as frequently as the family wishes. Lower Bucks Hospital in Bristol opened a four-bed newborn intensive-care unit June 28. A specialized team of physicians and nurses cares for infants who have been born prematurely or with disorders that require immediate and intensive care.
NEWS
January 10, 2016
Might extensive skin-to-skin contact between newborns and their mothers - dubbed "kangaroo care" - offer health benefits for the babies? A study in the current issue of the journal Pediatrics analyzed data on more than 215,000 newborns, gleaned from 124 studies that examined the relationship between various measures of neonatal health and kangaroo care, the snuggling of a newborn against its mother's chest, either under her clothing or with a blanket...
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Bruce Shipkowski, Associated Press
TRENTON - Newborns in New Jersey would have to be tested for congenital heart disease under legislation that continues to advance in the Legislature. It would require that pulse oximetry - a noninvasive and painless test - be administered at least 24 hours after a child's birth. Proponents call it a commonsense way to potentially save lives, and note that some hospitals already require it. Experts say roughly one child in 100 is born with structural problems in the heart, most of which are not diagnosed before birth.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Before the end of the year, hospitals in Pennsylvania will be required to test newborns for certain rare disorders where early detection could help save lives. Gov. Corbett on Wednesday signed a bill to expand newborn screenings to include six disorders. "We owe these children and their families a fighting chance," Corbett said at a news conference in the Capitol. The bill signing came amid a busy end-of-session legislative schedule. The General Assembly sent to Corbett's desk a child-protection bill that would prevent school employees in Pennsylvania who have been caught having sexual relationships with students from being hired by another school.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Legislation that would expand the legal definition of child abuse to include children born with drug or alcohol problems was unanimously approved by the state Senate yesterday. The bill's sponsor, Sen. James C. Greenwood (R., Bucks), said that he would work to get the bill adopted in the House but that it was unlikely to pass before the legislative session ends Nov. 30. That would mean that he would have to start the legislative process anew when the next session begins in January.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 6, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA ZOO Birth marred by a life in captivity Rather than celebrate, I mourn for the western lowland gorilla that has just given birth to an adorable baby at the Philadelphia Zoo ("Visiting hours for baby gorilla," Thursday). How can anyone feel good when looking at this mother and child confined in a cage? Honi is unable to share its true heritage with this child. It has no opportunity to receive the embrace of its peers. If we wants to see lowland gorillas or any other wildlife, it should not be in a zoo. True, we all cannot afford safari vacations, but we can see wildlife on TV with clarity and realism.
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
At Temple University Hospital on Thursday morning, Naomi Stevens, all 6 pounds, 9 ounces of her, was resting up for the big day ahead. Born two days before, Naomi was going home that day with her mom, Aracely Castro, 22, to West Philadelphia to be introduced to her brother and sister. "They were always kissing my belly," her mother said softly. "They didn't meet her before. " Along with mother and baby would come a special welcome gift from the hospital - one that will be given to all babies born at Temple in the next year.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A Burlington County woman who set her newborn daughter on fire hours after giving birth was sentenced Friday to 30 years in prison for aggravated manslaughter. Under the sentence imposed by Superior Court Judge Terrence Cook, Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier, 23, of Pemberton Township, must serve 85 percent of the term before she is eligible for parole. Family members packed the courtroom as Dorvilier's defense lawyer pleaded for leniency, arguing that she has a history of mental illness and disclosing publicly for the first time that her pregnancy resulted from a sexual assault.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old Franklin Township woman has been charged with killing her newborn baby, the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office said Thursday. Jade Fanz was charged with murder after the body of her daughter was found Feb. 27 on the property of her family's home on Proposed Avenue. Fanz killed her daughter "by applying pressure to the throat" and strangling her, the prosecutor's office said. Fanz was also charged with unlawfully disturbing, moving, or concealing human remains and the abuse or neglect of a child.
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
The Pemberton Township woman who set her newborn daughter on fire hours after giving birth pleaded guilty Monday to aggravated manslaughter. Prosecutors will recommend that Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier, 23, face 30 years in prison for the crime. Her original charge of murder was amended to aggravated manslaughter as part of a plea deal offered by prosecutors. Dorvilier's mother, Juana Sully, looked down and wiped away tears as Judge Terrence Cook read the terms of the deal in Superior Court in Burlington County.
NEWS
February 27, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
A plea deal has been offered to the Pemberton Township woman accused of setting her newborn on fire and killing her, a judge in Burlington County said Thursday. Judge Terrence Cook said Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier and her public defender, Karen Thek, still needed to review the offer, and scheduled another hearing for 9 a.m. Monday in Superior Court in Mount Holly. Thek and Deputy First Assistant Prosecutor James Ronca declined to discuss the details of the offer after Thursday's brief hearing.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Tom Avril and Dylan Purcell, STAFF WRITERS
Two hospitals in the Philadelphia region perform complex heart surgery on newborn babies. But the institutions' results are vastly different, an Inquirer analysis of insurance claims data shows. At St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, one in four babies less than a month old died after arduous, highly risky heart operations performed between 2009 and 2014, a death rate nearly triple that of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The newspaper began a review of St. Christopher's after it declined last year to publicly reveal how many of its heart-surgery patients died - the only one of six hospitals not included in a first-ever state evaluation of such programs.
NEWS
January 10, 2016
Might extensive skin-to-skin contact between newborns and their mothers - dubbed "kangaroo care" - offer health benefits for the babies? A study in the current issue of the journal Pediatrics analyzed data on more than 215,000 newborns, gleaned from 124 studies that examined the relationship between various measures of neonatal health and kangaroo care, the snuggling of a newborn against its mother's chest, either under her clothing or with a blanket...
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