FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
June 10, 1996 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Few women are aware that bacteria they commonly harbor in their bodies is the chief cause of life-threatening infection and death in newborns. Or that the devastating infections can be avoided. But that's about to change. Federal authorities last week issued guidelines for screening and treating pregnant women for Group B streptococcus to prevent infection of their babies during delivery. "The infections are so tragic because the pregnancy and delivery can go fine and then, a couple hours after delivery, the babies get very sick," said Anne Schuchat, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who helped develop the guidelines.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania has joined most states in requiring that newborns have their blood oxygen levels measured - a simple test that allows doctors to catch rare heart defects missed during prenatal screening. The test, known as pulse oximetry, consists of placing a small sensor on the infant's foot. It is common practice at birthing hospitals, but was not mandated in Pennsylvania. On Wednesday, Gov. Corbett signed the requirement, which takes effect in 90 days. Physicians say the test can detect problems while newborns are still in the hospital, in case they need surgery.
NEWS
September 27, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
During the past year, 23 Philadelphia children under age 4 developed AIDS, representing an alarming increase of a third over the previous year's pediatric AIDS cases. Each of the 23 cases was transmitted by a mother infected with HIV, the AIDS virus. Since 1981, 89 children under age 4 have been diagnosed with AIDS. The local explosion in cases contradicts a study by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released today that finds a "leveling" nationwide in the number of HIV-infected newborns since 1990.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Armed with a $170,710 federal grant, the state Health Department announced yesterday that it would begin testing all babies born in Philadelphia for sickle cell anemia and expand testing statewide next year. Starting June 1, newborns in Philadelphia will be tested for sickle cell in addition to hypothyroidism and phenylketonuria, two potentially serious disorders for which babies are already tested. Sickle cell anemia is a blood disorder that not only causes anemia, or weakness, but also can lead to blocked blood vessels, infections and other complications.
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
Somewhere out there is a girl named "Bong" and a boy named "Porsche. " There are infants somewhere in Pennsylvania named "Rayon," "Cosmo" and "Knowledge. " There is even, if you can believe it, a baby girl named "Genie" and a baby boy named "Aladdin. " Those are among the more eye-grabbing names given newborns in the state last year, according to the Department of Health. The agency maintains a sort of head count of what's happening in the name game from year to year.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two Bucks County hospitals recently added services for mothers and newborns. Medical College Hospital's Bucks County Campus in Warminster opened a 12- room maternity suite June 7. Each expectant mother is assigned a room where she goes through labor and delivery. After the birth, the mother remains in that room and has the option of keeping her baby with her. Fathers are invited to stay overnight and siblings are allowed to visit as frequently as the family wishes. Lower Bucks Hospital in Bristol opened a four-bed newborn intensive-care unit June 28. A specialized team of physicians and nurses cares for infants who have been born prematurely or with disorders that require immediate and intensive care.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Bruce Shipkowski, Associated Press
TRENTON - Newborns in New Jersey would have to be tested for congenital heart disease under legislation that continues to advance in the Legislature. It would require that pulse oximetry - a noninvasive and painless test - be administered at least 24 hours after a child's birth. Proponents call it a commonsense way to potentially save lives, and note that some hospitals already require it. Experts say roughly one child in 100 is born with structural problems in the heart, most of which are not diagnosed before birth.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Before the end of the year, hospitals in Pennsylvania will be required to test newborns for certain rare disorders where early detection could help save lives. Gov. Corbett on Wednesday signed a bill to expand newborn screenings to include six disorders. "We owe these children and their families a fighting chance," Corbett said at a news conference in the Capitol. The bill signing came amid a busy end-of-session legislative schedule. The General Assembly sent to Corbett's desk a child-protection bill that would prevent school employees in Pennsylvania who have been caught having sexual relationships with students from being hired by another school.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Legislation that would expand the legal definition of child abuse to include children born with drug or alcohol problems was unanimously approved by the state Senate yesterday. The bill's sponsor, Sen. James C. Greenwood (R., Bucks), said that he would work to get the bill adopted in the House but that it was unlikely to pass before the legislative session ends Nov. 30. That would mean that he would have to start the legislative process anew when the next session begins in January.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The day Brandon Diallo was born, no one had an inkling there was anything wrong with him. But in the middle of his second night at Virtua Memorial in Mount Holly, a nurse fastened a small oxygen sensor to his hand and foot. And then things started to happen in a hurry. After a helicopter flight in the early hours of Nov. 13 and delicate heart surgery at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the brown-eyed baby is just fine. But if not for the initial test at Virtua, required by a state law that took effect Aug. 31, doctors say brain damage was likely.
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NEWS
May 24, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
FIFTEEN STORIES above Center City streets, Arthur F. McMorris held a 21-day-old falcon in front of him and wedged a finger into the bird's screeching mouth. The bird's mouth looked healthy, its eyes bright and its talons strong. The only problem was that the chick and its three sisters were crawling with mites. For McMorris, peregrine falcon coordinator for the Pennsylvania Game Commission, the fix was simple - a bit of insecticide powder and the nestling would be on its way. The check-up was part of a banding process held yesterday in the City Hall tower, an event led by the game commission for the past five years.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a few days, surgeons at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are scheduled to operate on the heart of Graziella Nobile's newborn baby, fixing a grave arterial defect that, if left unrepaired, would be fatal. The hospital lately has a stellar record on that type of operation, in the sense of getting patients home alive. From 2009 to 2012, the most recent data available, 60 infants had this surgery, called an arterial switch, and all survived. The part that doctors have yet to figure out completely is the brain.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
HER NAME means "angelic" and that's the most that anyone can hope for Angelica, the newborn who died after being lit afire on a Burlington County roadside. Baby Angelica's mother, Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier, 22, appeared in Burlington County Superior Court yesterday via video monitor from prison to face murder charges, politely answering the judge's questions with a series of "Yes, your honor," but shedding no light on the crime of which she is accused. On Friday night, Dorvilier allegedly wrapped her newborn daughter - umbilical cord and placenta still attached - in a towel and papers and set her on fire along a stretch of Simontown Road in Pemberton Township, according to an affidavit of probable cause.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | *By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A candlelight vigil will be held Wednesday night at a Browns Mills church to mourn for a baby killed when her mother allegedly doused her with an accelerant and set her afire. The mother, Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier, was arrested Friday night and charged with murdering her newborn. Dorvilier, 22, of Pemberton Township, is in the Burlington County Minimum Security Facility with bail set at $500,000, and will have her first court appearance Tuesday afternoon. The Rev. Richard Esher, who heads the Browns Mills United Methodist Church, said a resident who is grieving the loss of his own baby had approached him about hosting the vigil.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
ALL THAT'S left is a soggy cliche, a makeshift memorial on a lonely stretch of road in New Jersey where people chuck empty beer cans into the woods without slowing down. Flowers, ribbons, police tape, an electric candle. Cheery stuffed animals that lose their charm as soon as it rains. Atop this sad totem pole, there's a white teddy bear in a ballerina outfit with the words "Camden pray for you" written across the front. Pemberton Township residents placed the items there in memory of a baby whose name they don't know.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dave Joseph was sleeping Friday night when he was awakened by his mother-in-law. She told him a car was on fire outside their home in Pemberton. Joseph looked into the darkness, he said, and saw what he thought was a brushfire in front of a parked car. Then he saw a young woman. Joseph approached and the woman said she was burning a pile of dog feces. When he ordered her to stop and leave, she poured water from a plastic bottle on the pile. That's when Joseph's wife, standing behind him, heard a baby cry. And Joseph discovered one of the most disturbing sights he has ever seen: An infant on fire.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susan Wallace is used to sad stories. An analyst for the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, she reviews the reports that health-care facilities must regularly submit to the state, describing unfortunate events from bedsores to surgeries on the wrong knee. As disturbing as it is to read about these incidents, she said, few have affected her as deeply as the one she came across a little more than a year ago. A mother fell asleep while breast-feeding her newborn. "Sometime later," the hospital reported, "the mother called the nurse, who found the baby blue and unresponsive.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Before the end of the year, hospitals in Pennsylvania will be required to test newborns for certain rare disorders where early detection could help save lives. Gov. Corbett on Wednesday signed a bill to expand newborn screenings to include six disorders. "We owe these children and their families a fighting chance," Corbett said at a news conference in the Capitol. The bill signing came amid a busy end-of-session legislative schedule. The General Assembly sent to Corbett's desk a child-protection bill that would prevent school employees in Pennsylvania who have been caught having sexual relationships with students from being hired by another school.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT and DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writerszalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
HER LIFE WAS short, but little Nicoletta Rose had an impact on many. An outpouring of support continued Thursday for the baby girl who died Monday after being delivered by emergency C-section after her mother was struck by a stray bullet that later killed her. As of Thursday night, an online donation fund set up by a family friend had raised nearly $6,000 - surpassing its initial $2,000 goal - to help cover funeral expenses for Nicoletta and...
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
EXACTLY A MONTH from today, 26-year-old Megan Doto was due to give birth. A baby boy, the petite, dark-haired mother-to-be gushed to friends and her neighbors in Frankford. She'd name the baby Carmine, she wrote on Facebook, proudly posting photos of her round belly. Yesterday, as Doto sat outside on her block of Adams Avenue near Griscom Street, soaking in a late-summer day under crystal-blue skies just before noon, that dream of raising baby Carmine was violently torn from the young mother.
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