CollectionsNewfoundland
IN THE NEWS

Newfoundland

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Terry Young, Los Angeles Daily News
This is it. You can't walk any farther. A precipice leads down nearly 400 feet to the cold and surging waters of the Atlantic Ocean. This is the end of North America. It is a boulder-strewn and grassy spot. It is usually wet and often foggy. And there is a lighthouse here. It is the easternmost point of North America. From this windswept point of Newfoundland, it is closer to Ireland (1,646 miles away) than it is to, say, Chicago. Cape Spear, which lies at the mouth of an inlet leading to St. John's Harbor, is also a hopeful place.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When explorer John Cabot discovered this wild, rocky, massive chunk of land in the North Atlantic 500 years ago, he remarked that codfish were so plentiful that he could catch one by just dipping his basket into the sea. For centuries, the hardy people who followed Cabot to Newfoundland relied on the sea with its rich stock of cod as a provider of plenty. Just five years ago, the cod fishery provided 45,000 jobs. But overfishing and a mysterious cooling of ocean waters that scientists believe is a paradoxical effect of global warming have caused the unthinkable - cod have all but disappeared.
NEWS
January 17, 1986
Short days ago the President was mourning the deaths of our soldiers in Newfoundland and acknowledging the debt the country owes to our armed forces and our veterans. Later we read that the President's budget for 1987 will drastically cut the health care benefits for those same veterans. Martin and Dorothy Ulan Lauderdale Lakes, Fla.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
The occasion was Leif Ericson Day, a national day honoring the first European to land in the New World, and it saw the true sons of the old ways set sail upon the flood once again. Yesterday they came to land, did the members of the Leif Ericson Society, at Boathouse Row, even as their hero did in Newfoundland in 1003.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schilli Maier, 67, a painter who taught for 15 years at Temple University's Tyler School of Fine Arts, died Monday at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. Also a resident of Long Beach Island, N.J., and Philadelphia at various times, Mr. Maier undertook a broad range of painting over the years, from his early landscapes, seascapes and still lifes to his recent, more lyrical work. His paintings are part of the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art, Columbia University, Lehigh University, Harcum College, Memorial College of Newfoundland, the Cleveland Art Museum and the St. Louis Art Museum, among others.
NEWS
December 17, 1986
An Inquirer editorial on Oct. 4 suggested that the problem of too many deer at the Schuylkill Valley Nature Center in the Roxborough section of Philadelphia might be solved by transporting about 80 of the animals to forests in northern Pennsylvania, with conservation groups perhaps volunteering to help move the deer and underwrite the costs. Nature center officials dismissed the idea as impractical and too expensive. It seems worth repeating in light of the operation this month in which 25 caribou captured in Newfoundland were relocated in Maine, where they have been extinct for decades.
TRAVEL
January 6, 2013 | By Shelley Cameron-McCarron, For The Inquirer
CONCHE, Newfoundland - I'm preparing to be drawn and quartered by my friends as we drive a long gravel road on the northeast tip of Newfoundland's rugged Great Northern Peninsula with no idea how far it is to the French Shore tapestries in Conche, an outport of 200 that had no road connection with the rest of the island until 1970. Just an hour and a half earlier we'd sat chummily, but road-weary, in St. Anthony - some 90 miles northwest - pondering the five-plus-hour drive we faced back to Corner Brook, when someone suggested nixing our planned side excursion.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman Flachs, 77, a clinical social worker with a practice in Northeast Philadelphia, died Friday at his home in Cheyney. Mr. Flachs was a childhood vaudeville star, said his son Charles. At age 6, Mr. Flachs and his sister, Sylvia, performed a singing, tap dancing and tumbling routine with the Lippel Sisters' Kutie Kids Revue in Newark, N.J. "They did so well that they were invited to go on the road," Charles Flachs said. "But my grandfather would not have it. " Still, Charles Flachs, who went on to become a professional ballet dancer, said he was inspired by tales of his father as an entertainer.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Mac Daniel, Special to The Inquirer
The fifth graders at Willow Hill Elementary School in Abington have been gabbing with their peers. But instead of talking about Saturday morning cartoons or the latest in skateboard technology, these youngsters were pondering whether to send their garbage to Newfoundland and if Montgomery County's drunken-driving laws were tough enough. Heady stuff for 10- and 11-year-olds. But the talk is doing more than tackle tough issues. With the help of a computer, a modem and some deep thought, the students at Willow Hill are having their eyes and minds opened to issues and places that lie beyond their classrooms.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1988 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Newfoundland: remote and rocky, a land of short summers and long fogs. The kind of place where a Goldenberg's Peanut Chew could sure help a person make it through the day. Which might explain why Newfoundland has one of the world's highest per- capita consumptions of Peanut Chews. Philadelphia's Goldenberg Candy Co. ships about 240,000 Peanut Chews bars to Newfoundland each year, enough for two-fifths of the province's population to have one apiece. It's not clear why Peanut Chews are so popular in Newfoundland (a recent foray into three Philadelphia luncheonettes turned up none at all)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2013
TransAtlantic A Novel By Colum McCann Random House. 259 pp. $27 Reviewed by Dan DeLuca   Colum McCann's TransAtlantic is, if anything, even more ambitious than Let The Great World Spin , his 2009 National Book Award-winning novel about the overlapping lives of ordinary people 110 stories below Phillipe Petit's 1974 World Trade Center high-wire walk. In TransAtlantic , the Irish-born, New York-based novelist hopscotches back and forth   over an ocean.
TRAVEL
January 6, 2013 | By Shelley Cameron-McCarron, For The Inquirer
CONCHE, Newfoundland - I'm preparing to be drawn and quartered by my friends as we drive a long gravel road on the northeast tip of Newfoundland's rugged Great Northern Peninsula with no idea how far it is to the French Shore tapestries in Conche, an outport of 200 that had no road connection with the rest of the island until 1970. Just an hour and a half earlier we'd sat chummily, but road-weary, in St. Anthony - some 90 miles northwest - pondering the five-plus-hour drive we faced back to Corner Brook, when someone suggested nixing our planned side excursion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | staff
What's not to love about Hey Rosetta!, the polished alt-pop rockers from St. John's, Newfoundland? They boast a yearning, ultra-sincere lead singer who sounds like a mash-up of Chris Martin, Paul Simon and Brandon Flowers. And they crank earnest anthems loud and gracefully, with warming violin and cello players you can actually hear in the mix (take a hint, Arcade Fire). Oh, and Hey Rosetta! makes equally vivid videos. (Check out the charming, ballet-themed "Yer Spring" at YouTube.) Hailed as one of the "must see" attractions of the recent Austin, Texas, SXSW music soiree - and now they're here in our own back yard.
SPORTS
June 22, 2007
MOORESTOWN, N.J. - His future lay 1,805 miles away, on the easternmost point of an island nearer the Arctic Circle than his Moorestown home. This is where the National Hockey League would discover T.J. Brennan. Not 14 miles from the sixth-largest media capital of the United States, where he learned and honed his game. In St. John's, the frozen, fog-thick capital of the Canadian province of Newfoundland. Not the end of the world. Not officially anyway. But if the mist ever lifted, you might be able to see it from there.
NEWS
July 10, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marguerite V. Hawco Casale, 74, an accomplished needle artist and owner of the Knit With yarn shop in Chestnut Hill, died July 4 of ovarian cancer at her home above the store on Germantown Avenue. Mrs. Casale grew up on a sheep farm at Hawco's Point, Chapel's Cove, on the North Atlantic coast of Newfoundland, where her father taught her to plow, plant crops and tend the animals. Her grandmother taught her to knit practical, warm clothing to chase away winter chills in their farmhouse, which had no electricity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2002 | By DAVID BLEILER & DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
Studios will usually release what they think are their best movies at the end of the year for Academy Award consideration. Inevitably, there are a couple of highly anticipated films that fail to deliver on their promise. Two such films from 2001's holiday season debut on video this week. Based on E. Annie Proulx's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "The Shipping News" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99) is a prestige film in need of some prestige. In this languidly paced film, Kevin Spacey plays an oafish father who returns to the family home in Newfoundland to begin life anew.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In a seamless special effect that shows the face of a boy under water turn into the face of the same person still submerged and struggling for air as a 36-year-old man, The Shipping News introduces its sorry protagonist, Quoyle, to the screen. In filmmaker Lasse Hallstr?m's bleak and melancholy adaptation of E. Annie Proulx's much-beloved Shipping News, the origins of our hero's angst are as plain as the look of horror on his mug: a domineering, unloving father, and a dysfunctional childhood that has left him a broken, wounded soul.
NEWS
November 3, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Fredrick Connor Kline, of Warminster in Bucks County, a retired executive for an art-supply business and a professional musician, died Friday. He died at Abington Memorial Hospital after an illness, exactly a month after his 80th birthday. For more than 40 years, he worked for Joseph E. Podgor Inc., a Pennsauken, N.J., distributor of art supplies. He was vice president when he retired in 1989. Mr. Kline was a life member of the Philadelphia Musicians Union Local 77 and played the bass for many years in bands that entertained at Main Line social events.
SPORTS
November 10, 1998 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Gary Hall Jr., who won four medals at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 - two of them gold - was cited for marijuana use by swimming's governing body yesterday, but was eligible to compete. Hall was suspended for three months by the drug panel of FINA, the international federation, for testing positive for marijuana. However, FINA deducted the three months served by Hall under a temporary suspension, meaning he faced no further penalty. Hall, who lives in Phoenix, was training in Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | By Laura Randall
The media excel at coming up with verbs to describe a hurricane's wrath. Pounds, lashes, batters, rakes, menaces and spawns were a few used to convey the strength of Hurricane Georges, the force with the gentle French name that swept across the Greater Antilles this week. Harder to explain to those whose familiarity with hurricanes is limited to blustery snapshots and sound bites on wind velocity is the emotional toll the storms can take on residents of these areas - even those whose belongings and loved ones remain intact.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|