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News Conference

NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Ben Finley and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police did an abrupt U-turn Sunday, announcing that they were mistaken about a widely reported incident they had labeled earlier in the day as a kidnapping. In fact, the supposed kidnappers were family members trying to aid a woman at a gas station who was emotionally distressed, officials said after they had time to review the Saturday night incident more fully. "The female was upset due to recent personal matters and she had fled from another vehicle while driving with a family member," the department said in correcting its mistake.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | Howard Gensler, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
Whenever Sandra Bullock or George Clooney participate in a news conference, it's like watching an amusing comedy sketch. When they take the stage together, it's more like watching Stiller and Meara or Nichols and May. The two megastars have known each other for so long they have an easygoing camaraderie, finish each others punch lines and are such seasoned pros at this, they basically don't give a damn. They mock dumb reporter questions, the entire news conference process, each other, themselves and sometimes their movies.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER yesterday said he does not know what's true or untrue regarding allegations that Department of Licenses and Inspections employees are failing to properly inspect all demolition projects, and therefore has ordered an investigation. "If true, it is completely unacceptable. But quite honestly, we are not exactly sure whether the reports - all of them, some of them, a few of them - are in fact true or not," Nutter said at a City Hall news conference. The Inquirer on Sunday reported that an analysis found that the department failed to follow new inspection guidelines in more than 80 percent of private demolitions performed since Jan. 1. Of 82 demolitions examined by the paper, 83 percent had not been inspected at all or were not properly inspected using new guidelines put in place following the June 2013 Market Street building collapse that killed six people, while just 17 percent were correctly inspected, the paper reported.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
T. MILTON STREET Sr. said he will soon add a new chapter to the sordid Pennsylvania political embarrassment that is Porngate - all thanks to a Harrisburg source he's calling "Deep Throat. " (Yeah. Let that sink in for a minute.) Street, who ran unsuccessfully in the spring for the Democratic mayoral nomination, said yesterday that he plans to host a news conference on Nov. 5 outside the District Attorney's Office to unveil more pornographic emails that prosecutor Frank Fina allegedly sent and received while he worked for the state Attorney General's Office several years ago. The emails are different from the controversial batch of exchanges the state Supreme Court made public in late August.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
RESTAURANT owners, apple lovers and selfie-stick users can rest easy: The 2016 Democratic National Convention won't have any of the negative restrictions that were associated with the recent papal visit. That was one of the core messages that Mayor Nutter emphasized at a news conference with DNC officials inside a South Philadelphia printing shop yesterday afternoon. The other: Local businesses stand to make a lot of money off the convention next July. As many as 50,000 people are expected to attend the DNC - being held in Philly for the first time since 1948 - bringing an estimated $350 million economic impact to the city, said the Rev. Leah Daughtry, the convention's CEO. Daughtry said DNC officials would spend up to $50 million on convention-related necessities, including lighting and staging equipment.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey couldn't stand the thought of burying another one of his own. It was March, and he had long been thinking of retirement, ever since Mayor Nutter had won reelection. Even then, he had been "95 percent sure. " His career was at an apex - there had been presidential appointments, and prominent positions on national policing boards, and an unprecedented drop in homicides in a city once dubbed "Killadelphia. " And now he was eulogizing Sgt. Robert Wilson III, gunned down in a robbery gone wrong, the eighth officer he had laid to rest.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
POLICE COMMISSIONER Charles Ramsey will announce his intention to retire at the end of the year during a news conference this morning at City Hall, the Daily News has learned. In an email last night, the Nutter administration alerted reporters to the fact that the mayor would make a "major public safety announcement" today, but offered no details. Earlier this year, Ramsey seemed open to staying on as commissioner even after Mayor Nutter's tenure ends in January. "I feel pretty good," Ramsey told the Daily News in March.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Diane Mastrull, Julia Terruso, and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The glow of the papal extravaganza that put Philadelphia in the global spotlight began to fade as it became clear Monday that the historic event had lifted the city's profile while harming the bottom lines of many of its businesses. The damage was worse than many expected, and appeared to be the result of a drumbeat of disclosures about onerous security measures, as well as missteps by hoteliers and business owners who misread the spending appetites of the hundreds of thousands eager to see Pope Francis in the flesh.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WHEN WEST Philly native Jerry Davis was a 22-year-old officer in the U.S. Marine Corps serving in Okinawa, Japan, in 1963, he couldn't go off base with his white comrades. "Basically, when you went off base, you might as well have been in the deep South because that side of town was for whites only," Davis said. "So I had to go to the other side of town, which was for people of color. " The discrimination left Davis feeling "very, very alone," so instead of going out with his fellow officers, he volunteered at a Christian orphanage and spent his free time at a Catholic church.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
NEARLY FOUR MONTHS ago, Pope Francis decried global warming as a man-made catastrophe requiring immediate ecological activism and blamed modern materialism for turning the planet into "an immense pile of filth. " Yesterday, a few folks in Philly didn't mince words in their opinions of the pollution-busting pleas the pope made last May in his encyclical, Laudato si '. Paganism, declared one. "What is environmentalism but nature worship?" said Gene Koprowski, marketing director of the Heartland Institute.
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