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NEWS
December 11, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
To all those people out there who read their horoscopes religiously every day, scrutinizing every aspect of their lives under the microscope of those five or six lines of type, astrologer Sally Brompton has this word of advice. Darlings . . . you really must get over it. "You can take quite a lot of it seriously, actually, but you can't go mad with it or you would never get out of bed in the morning," said the London- born astrologer with a laugh. "It's not really intended to be a predictive thing, it is really a framework for the future, like a weather map. It provides a series of potentials, it is up to you to make the most of the situation as it exists.
NEWS
February 2, 2009 | By Jay Smith
Eight months ago, I retired from a 37-year newspaper career. Since then, I've watched silently at what has transpired in my old business, and my amazement has turned to horror. On a dreary morning in January, I got together with three industry colleagues who are continuing the fight for their publications. Their passion and enthusiasm contrasted with the cold, damp weather, as well as with the bleak forecasts for newspapers. Their voices have not been heard much, but they should be. If nobody reads newspapers anymore, I wonder, why did the governor of Illinois try to silence the Chicago Tribune's editorial writers?
NEWS
December 14, 2006
THE Daily News and the Inquirer are the print town criers of the past, present and the future. We the people must step up and continue to give these two informative and thought-inspiring newspapers our support. We must purchase them, and place our ads in them - and continue to place our input in them by answering various editorials with our letters. The newspaper gives us all a chance to read and think. Their words can bring us to every part of the world, they give insight to those who seek public office, and the reader gains the knowledge.
NEWS
February 14, 2006 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
DISCUSSIONS about the grim future of newspapers can sound self-serving when journalists do the talking. But I don't make my living from newspapers - I want them to survive because I'm a reader not a writer. The first problem: Content is old before the ink is dry. Radio, TV and especially the Internet have accelerated that aging process and expose newspapers - both the product and the institution - to competition from more nimble content providers. Second problem: The Internet has also increased the competition among newspapers themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2011
It's a marvelous night for a womb dance . . . Two British tabs have published evidence that they say proves that singer Van Morrison fathered a child out of wedlock with one of his U.S. tour promoters. Morrison flatly denied a relationship with the Texas mother, GiGi Lee , when his own website (which his people claim had been hacked into) published an announcement on Dec. 29, 2009, of the birth of "little Van. " Big Van, 65, instructed his Irish publicist to say that he didn't even know the purported mother, identified incorrectly as "his wife GiGi.
NEWS
October 6, 2005 | By Mark Franek
I teach at a high school where the kids are bright, well-informed and politically astute. Most of them, however, think that a newspaper is something you use to clean up after a dog or put beneath an opened can of paint. They get most of their news from the Internet or from cable shows like Jon Stewart's The Daily Show, two forums that hardly existed 10 years ago. This is not altogether a bad thing. For example, this fall I will write college recommendations for about 10 seniors.
NEWS
October 17, 2012
Newspaper delivery drivers, clerks, dispatchers, security guards, and building services personnel represented by Teamsters Local 628 voted Sunday to authorize a strike against Interstate General Media, the company that owns The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com. Approximately 300 union members are working under the terms of their contract that expired Oct. 8. Talks are expected to continue this week, said the union president, John Laigaie.   - Jane M. Von Bergen  
NEWS
May 30, 2006 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
THE "PUBLIC trust" aspect of newspapers is a bloated, facile and ultimately incoherent basis for running a newspaper. And the new ownership of the Daily News and Inky give us a chance to abandon the idea. In February, I offered some advice to imaginary investors in our papers. The gist: Let the papers compete with each other, prioritize the day's events for readers and dominate the local market. We now have new owners - and they turn out to be people who make that advice sounder than ever.
NEWS
November 21, 2010
I love dictionaries. Looking up one word leads the eye to the words before and following, the next, and the next, and before you know it, you have read the meanings of intent. Reading the newspaper has the same effect. Each page offers myriad articles to read and I find myself reading about topics in which I thought I had no interest, from a Mickey Mouse collector to what the Eagles might offer Michael Vick. Would my eye be so captured on a website? Would I continue to expand my understanding of the world if I read only the articles I choose on my iPad?
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | By Jane R. Eisner
High school newspapers should be to journalism what Little League is to pro ball - a place and time when young people can feel the purity of expression and the responsibility of teamwork before adult rules and standards take over. But not if adults insist on umpiring from the grandstand. Little Leaguers may dream of one day swinging a bat in the big leagues, but most of them never will. And while every kid working on a high school newspaper harbors a Woodward-and-Bernstein aspiration or two, most of them won't go pro, either.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | David Haas
David Haas is vice chair of Wyncote Foundation, a member of the board of managers of the Institute for Journalism in New Media, and a board member of Media Impact Funders The extraordinary gift by Gerry Lenfest in donating The Philadelphia Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com to the newly formed nonprofit Institute for Journalism in New Media places Philadelphia at the center of a disruptive storm sweeping all legacy media and accomplishes two...
NEWS
January 15, 2016
By Jackie Soteropoulos Incollingo With a bold and innovative plan, H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest - now the former owner of the company that runs The Inquirer, the Daily News, and Philly.com - has put Philadelphia at the forefront of exploring a new economic model for struggling metropolitan newspapers. Lenfest's decision to donate the properties to a nonprofit institute is a gift to the region's citizens, but it is an even larger gift to the future of journalism, given the critical role that news and information play in our democracy and the troubled economic times facing many media outlets.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
ISSUE | MEDIA A Philadelphia gift H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, the owner of Philadelphia Media Network, has provided great news for the city with his landmark gift of his and our daily newspapers and website. It feels as though professional journalism has been saved, at least here. A nonprofit institute created by the venerable Philadelphia Foundation will operate the for-profit enterprise, making this journalism advance credible now and for the future. While the first three estates of government are troubled and stymied, it's important that the fourth estate have strength if we are to governmentally and individually adapt to changing times and our democracy is to thrive.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, STAFF WRITER
A crowd of about 75 people turned out at the National Constitution Center this morning as the owner of The Inquirer and its sister publications signed a ceremonial document marking his donation of the news organizations to a new media institute. "What would the city be without the Inquirer and the Daily News?" asked H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, who until his gift was the sole owner of The Inquirer, Daily News and Philly.com website. No TV, radio or internet portal can match the news agencies in-depth coverage, he said.
NEWS
December 20, 2015
Harold W. Andersen, 92, the former publisher of Nebraska's largest daily newspaper and first American to be president of the International Federation of Newspaper Publishers, died Thursday, Dec. 17, at the Nebraska Medical Center of natural causes. "He loved being a journalist," his wife, Marian, said. "That's what drove him. " Mr. Andersen started his career as a reporter in 1945, and was publisher and chief executive of the Omaha World-Herald from 1966 until 1989. He also served high-profile roles for groups representing newspapers around the country and the world, including the American Newspaper Publishers Association and the World Press Freedom Committee.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | BY DAN SPINELLI, Daily News Staff Writer spineld@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
THE HEADLINE read: Philadelphia City Paper to stop existing . And beneath it last night on the alternative weekly's website: We were surprised, too . Yesterday, Broad Street Media LLC, which also owns the Northeast Times and the South Philly Review , bought the Philadelphia City Paper from Metro Corp. and said the weekly would cease publication next Thursday and some content would appear in longtime competitor Philly Weekly . "While we respect the history Philadelphia has with City Paper , we have made a commitment to Philly Weekly that we intend to honor," Broad Street Media publisher Perry Corsetti said in a statement.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John A. Severance, 79, of Malvern, a former newspaper advertising executive, died Friday, Sept. 18, at Lankenau Hospital of complications from a previous surgery. Born in Berwyn, Mr. Severance was the son of Kathryn Holman Severance and Alexander Severance, basketball coach at Villanova University for 25 seasons and a justice of the peace in Berwyn. Such officials are now called district judges. Mr. Severance graduated from St. Agnes High School in West Chester and Villanova University.
NEWS
September 15, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis William "Bill" Sabatino, 70, a longtime labor relations executive for the company that owned The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News, died Sept. 6 at his home in Gulf Shores, Ala. He was diagnosed with leukemia last year and was under a physician's care at the time of his death. A professional football defensive lineman for the Cleveland Browns and the Atlanta Falcons in the late 1960s, Mr. Sabatino went on to become a federal mediator before his career as a newspaper executive.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twitter, Facebook, Instagram - the trinity of social media - have changed the way public relations professionals do business. Where once they worked mostly to get their clients in print, more PR professionals now are needed to curate a company's Web content, devise online campaigns, and develop strategies to deal with complaints and maintain corporate reputations. "The advent and continual evolution of social media has made PR even more critical to organizations," said Kate Shields, president of Vault Communications in Plymouth Meeting.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert W. Lambert Sr., 76, of Westville, who retired in 2006 as a machinist for The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News, died of lung disease Thursday, July 23, at Elmwood Hills Healthcare Center in Blackwood. Tom Riley, production maintenance director for the newspapers' publisher, Philadelphia Media Network, had known Mr. Lambert since 1991 and said "he was a quiet and skillful machinist. " Mr. Lambert, Riley said, "helped maintain and repair the pressroom equipment. " Before assuming his current job, Riley was the machine shop manager and Mr. Lambert's immediate superior.
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