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NEWS
December 11, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
To all those people out there who read their horoscopes religiously every day, scrutinizing every aspect of their lives under the microscope of those five or six lines of type, astrologer Sally Brompton has this word of advice. Darlings . . . you really must get over it. "You can take quite a lot of it seriously, actually, but you can't go mad with it or you would never get out of bed in the morning," said the London- born astrologer with a laugh. "It's not really intended to be a predictive thing, it is really a framework for the future, like a weather map. It provides a series of potentials, it is up to you to make the most of the situation as it exists.
NEWS
February 2, 2009 | By Jay Smith
Eight months ago, I retired from a 37-year newspaper career. Since then, I've watched silently at what has transpired in my old business, and my amazement has turned to horror. On a dreary morning in January, I got together with three industry colleagues who are continuing the fight for their publications. Their passion and enthusiasm contrasted with the cold, damp weather, as well as with the bleak forecasts for newspapers. Their voices have not been heard much, but they should be. If nobody reads newspapers anymore, I wonder, why did the governor of Illinois try to silence the Chicago Tribune's editorial writers?
NEWS
December 14, 2006
THE Daily News and the Inquirer are the print town criers of the past, present and the future. We the people must step up and continue to give these two informative and thought-inspiring newspapers our support. We must purchase them, and place our ads in them - and continue to place our input in them by answering various editorials with our letters. The newspaper gives us all a chance to read and think. Their words can bring us to every part of the world, they give insight to those who seek public office, and the reader gains the knowledge.
NEWS
February 14, 2006 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
DISCUSSIONS about the grim future of newspapers can sound self-serving when journalists do the talking. But I don't make my living from newspapers - I want them to survive because I'm a reader not a writer. The first problem: Content is old before the ink is dry. Radio, TV and especially the Internet have accelerated that aging process and expose newspapers - both the product and the institution - to competition from more nimble content providers. Second problem: The Internet has also increased the competition among newspapers themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2011
It's a marvelous night for a womb dance . . . Two British tabs have published evidence that they say proves that singer Van Morrison fathered a child out of wedlock with one of his U.S. tour promoters. Morrison flatly denied a relationship with the Texas mother, GiGi Lee , when his own website (which his people claim had been hacked into) published an announcement on Dec. 29, 2009, of the birth of "little Van. " Big Van, 65, instructed his Irish publicist to say that he didn't even know the purported mother, identified incorrectly as "his wife GiGi.
NEWS
October 6, 2005 | By Mark Franek
I teach at a high school where the kids are bright, well-informed and politically astute. Most of them, however, think that a newspaper is something you use to clean up after a dog or put beneath an opened can of paint. They get most of their news from the Internet or from cable shows like Jon Stewart's The Daily Show, two forums that hardly existed 10 years ago. This is not altogether a bad thing. For example, this fall I will write college recommendations for about 10 seniors.
NEWS
October 17, 2012
Newspaper delivery drivers, clerks, dispatchers, security guards, and building services personnel represented by Teamsters Local 628 voted Sunday to authorize a strike against Interstate General Media, the company that owns The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com. Approximately 300 union members are working under the terms of their contract that expired Oct. 8. Talks are expected to continue this week, said the union president, John Laigaie.   - Jane M. Von Bergen  
NEWS
May 30, 2006 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
THE "PUBLIC trust" aspect of newspapers is a bloated, facile and ultimately incoherent basis for running a newspaper. And the new ownership of the Daily News and Inky give us a chance to abandon the idea. In February, I offered some advice to imaginary investors in our papers. The gist: Let the papers compete with each other, prioritize the day's events for readers and dominate the local market. We now have new owners - and they turn out to be people who make that advice sounder than ever.
NEWS
November 21, 2010
I love dictionaries. Looking up one word leads the eye to the words before and following, the next, and the next, and before you know it, you have read the meanings of intent. Reading the newspaper has the same effect. Each page offers myriad articles to read and I find myself reading about topics in which I thought I had no interest, from a Mickey Mouse collector to what the Eagles might offer Michael Vick. Would my eye be so captured on a website? Would I continue to expand my understanding of the world if I read only the articles I choose on my iPad?
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | By Jane R. Eisner
High school newspapers should be to journalism what Little League is to pro ball - a place and time when young people can feel the purity of expression and the responsibility of teamwork before adult rules and standards take over. But not if adults insist on umpiring from the grandstand. Little Leaguers may dream of one day swinging a bat in the big leagues, but most of them never will. And while every kid working on a high school newspaper harbors a Woodward-and-Bernstein aspiration or two, most of them won't go pro, either.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald L. Martin, 67, of Tabernacle, executive editor of the Burlington County Times from 1996 to 2008, died of cancer Saturday, July 11, at Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice in Mount Holly. Steve Todd, the newspaper's general manager since 2010, who had first met Mr. Martin at the Willingboro paper in the 1970s, said, "He was a true local community journalist. " "He was a great leader in the newsroom," Todd added. Beyond the newsroom, Todd said, "he was one of the directors for the Ellis Family Foundation . . . created by Shirley Ellis, one of the owners of the newspaper.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia's tentative agreement with the owners of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com calls for no increase in health-care costs and the end of unpaid furloughs for Guild members, the union said. In an e-mail to its members Monday morning, the Guild announced that it had negotiated a two-year deal with Philadelphia Media Network that also included no changes to the health-care plan for at least the first year of the contract.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER MONTHS of contentious negotiations over health care and seniority rules, members of the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia last night authorized a strike if no resolution can be reached with the owner of the city's two daily newspapers and their website. "Striking is a last resort, and we certainly hope it doesn't come to that," Guild president Howard Gensler said at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel in Center City, where paper ballots were cast. "If it does, it's because the company forced the membership's hand.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the largest union representing employees at The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com voted Wednesday evening to authorize strike preparations as ongoing contract negotiations have yielded no breakthroughs. The vote - 263-19 in the main unit and 24-7 in the unit representing Philly.com employees - authorized the executive board of the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia to plan for a strike by 445 employees at the city's two largest newspapers and their companion website.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WANTED to see a face light up with a happy smile, all you had to do was say the words "Lou Voci' to anyone who had known the man even slightly. Lou Voci was a single-copy supervisor for the Daily News and Inquirer for more than 30 years, a man known for his devotion to his job, his meticulous attention to detail and a friendly nature that endeared him to everyone he met. "Everybody loved Lou," said Bob Palmo, retired regional manager in the newspapers' circulation department and Lou's onetime boss.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Don Schanche Jr., ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - Claude Sitton, 89, a newspaper journalist who set the pace for reporters covering the civil-rights movement in the South in the 1950s and '60s and later won a Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary, died Tuesday in Atlanta. He had been under hospice care with heart failure. Mr. Sitton, a Georgia native, began crisscrossing the South for the New York Times in 1958 and became a leading figure among the reporters covering the civil-rights struggle, said Hank Klibanoff, who cowrote The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle and the Awakening of a Nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THERE ONCE was a time that publishing lies was a bad thing. Now publishing truth is a bad thing. We're not talking about newspapers' or networks' political biases, or about charged issues for which people can have different opinions. We're referring to the ultra-Orthodox Israeli newspaper HaMevaser ("The Announcer"), which published the photo of world leaders linking arms at the Charlie Hebdo rally in Paris and photoshopped out the women - you know, like Angela Merkel , chancellor of that little European hamlet called Germany.
NEWS
November 28, 2014
THE FOLLOWING are excerpts from editorials around the country on the grand-jury decision in Ferguson: From the Los Angeles Times : . . . Just because Wilson will not face a trial does not mean that the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department has been vindicated or that no consequences will result from this episode. The department's nearly all-white force and its adoption of military-style equipment and tactics are reminiscent of a long-discredited Los Angeles Police Department, which learned the hard lessons of that combination in the early 1990s, when the city confronted . . . the beating of Rodney King.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MIKE EROH wasn't about to let being laid up at home stop him from doing his job. Mike was the senior home-delivery manager for the Daily News and Inquirer in South Jersey and he had a phone. While recovering from hernia surgery, Mike would get on that phone and call the warehouse in Turnersville, N.J., every day to find out what was going on, what the problems were and how to fix them. Unfortunately, Mike never made it back to work. He died Thursday of a massive heart attack.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James J. Marengo Sr., 88, of Lindenwold, an Inquirer pressman from 1956 to 1992, died of complications from liver and kidney diseases Saturday, Nov. 1, at Kennedy University Hospital in Washington Township. Mr. Marengo grew up near 13th and Mifflin Streets in South Philadelphia, graduated from South Philadelphia High School, and served in the Army of Occupation in Japan in the late 1940s, a daughter, Kathleen Cornwall, said. He had been a shipfitter's apprentice at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard before his Army service and returned to work there.
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