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NEWS
December 11, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
To all those people out there who read their horoscopes religiously every day, scrutinizing every aspect of their lives under the microscope of those five or six lines of type, astrologer Sally Brompton has this word of advice. Darlings . . . you really must get over it. "You can take quite a lot of it seriously, actually, but you can't go mad with it or you would never get out of bed in the morning," said the London- born astrologer with a laugh. "It's not really intended to be a predictive thing, it is really a framework for the future, like a weather map. It provides a series of potentials, it is up to you to make the most of the situation as it exists.
NEWS
February 2, 2009 | By Jay Smith
Eight months ago, I retired from a 37-year newspaper career. Since then, I've watched silently at what has transpired in my old business, and my amazement has turned to horror. On a dreary morning in January, I got together with three industry colleagues who are continuing the fight for their publications. Their passion and enthusiasm contrasted with the cold, damp weather, as well as with the bleak forecasts for newspapers. Their voices have not been heard much, but they should be. If nobody reads newspapers anymore, I wonder, why did the governor of Illinois try to silence the Chicago Tribune's editorial writers?
NEWS
December 14, 2006
THE Daily News and the Inquirer are the print town criers of the past, present and the future. We the people must step up and continue to give these two informative and thought-inspiring newspapers our support. We must purchase them, and place our ads in them - and continue to place our input in them by answering various editorials with our letters. The newspaper gives us all a chance to read and think. Their words can bring us to every part of the world, they give insight to those who seek public office, and the reader gains the knowledge.
NEWS
February 14, 2006 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
DISCUSSIONS about the grim future of newspapers can sound self-serving when journalists do the talking. But I don't make my living from newspapers - I want them to survive because I'm a reader not a writer. The first problem: Content is old before the ink is dry. Radio, TV and especially the Internet have accelerated that aging process and expose newspapers - both the product and the institution - to competition from more nimble content providers. Second problem: The Internet has also increased the competition among newspapers themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2011
It's a marvelous night for a womb dance . . . Two British tabs have published evidence that they say proves that singer Van Morrison fathered a child out of wedlock with one of his U.S. tour promoters. Morrison flatly denied a relationship with the Texas mother, GiGi Lee , when his own website (which his people claim had been hacked into) published an announcement on Dec. 29, 2009, of the birth of "little Van. " Big Van, 65, instructed his Irish publicist to say that he didn't even know the purported mother, identified incorrectly as "his wife GiGi.
NEWS
October 6, 2005 | By Mark Franek
I teach at a high school where the kids are bright, well-informed and politically astute. Most of them, however, think that a newspaper is something you use to clean up after a dog or put beneath an opened can of paint. They get most of their news from the Internet or from cable shows like Jon Stewart's The Daily Show, two forums that hardly existed 10 years ago. This is not altogether a bad thing. For example, this fall I will write college recommendations for about 10 seniors.
NEWS
October 17, 2012
Newspaper delivery drivers, clerks, dispatchers, security guards, and building services personnel represented by Teamsters Local 628 voted Sunday to authorize a strike against Interstate General Media, the company that owns The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com. Approximately 300 union members are working under the terms of their contract that expired Oct. 8. Talks are expected to continue this week, said the union president, John Laigaie.   - Jane M. Von Bergen  
NEWS
May 30, 2006 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
THE "PUBLIC trust" aspect of newspapers is a bloated, facile and ultimately incoherent basis for running a newspaper. And the new ownership of the Daily News and Inky give us a chance to abandon the idea. In February, I offered some advice to imaginary investors in our papers. The gist: Let the papers compete with each other, prioritize the day's events for readers and dominate the local market. We now have new owners - and they turn out to be people who make that advice sounder than ever.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | By Jane R. Eisner
High school newspapers should be to journalism what Little League is to pro ball - a place and time when young people can feel the purity of expression and the responsibility of teamwork before adult rules and standards take over. But not if adults insist on umpiring from the grandstand. Little Leaguers may dream of one day swinging a bat in the big leagues, but most of them never will. And while every kid working on a high school newspaper harbors a Woodward-and-Bernstein aspiration or two, most of them won't go pro, either.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Tribune Co. has appointed the leader of its Chicago newspaper to oversee six other dailies as part of a reorganization that will eliminate more jobs at the troubled media company. The changes announced Monday will give Chicago Tribune publisher Tony Hunter responsibility for all Tribune Co. newspapers except the Los Angeles Times. The other newspapers reporting to Hunter are the Sun in Baltimore, the Morning Call in Allentown, the South Florida Sun Sentinel, Hartford Courant, and the Daily Press in Newport News, Va. Tribune Co. also promoted Vince Casanova to be president and chief operating officer of Chicago Tribune Media Group.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John J. "Jack" Shirley, 79, of Lansdale, retired director of the Employee Assistance Program at the Inquirer and Daily News, died Saturday, July 16, of Parkinson's disease at St. Mary's Manor, Lansdale. Mr. Shirley worked for Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. - predecessor of Philadelphia Media Network - from 1980 to 2000, when he retired for the first time. He started out as a district manager in the circulation department, which is responsible for the distribution of newspapers. He quickly advanced to the position of zone manager.
NEWS
July 19, 2016
By David Chavern At the end of June, the head of the Federal Communications Commission announced a proposal that would keep in place an absolute ban that prohibits investors from owning both a daily newspaper and a television or radio station in the same market. Established more than 40 years ago, in 1975, this ban on media cross-ownership seemed to make sense at the time. Those were the days of gasoline rationing, bell bottoms, and offices buzzing with the rat-a-tat-tat of the typewriter.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Vibha Kannan and Bonnie L. Cook, STAFF WRITERS
Albert V. Grifone, 92, of Newtown Square, former vice president and chief financial officer of Triangle Publications Inc., publisher of TV Guide, died Thursday, June 30, of congestive heart failure at White Horse Village. Mr. Grifone's business career at Triangle, under publisher Walter H. Annenberg, spanned more than four decades. He also served on the board of directors from 1975 to 1988, the year the company was sold. Despite Mr. Grifone's professional successes, family members said he remained humble and grounded.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Chris Palmer and Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITERS
City officials have added the white tower that formerly housed the Inquirer and Daily News to a list of possible locations for the Police Department's new headquarters, Mayor Kenney said Tuesday. The surprise search, first reported by Philadelphia Magazine online, comes even as renovations continue on a West Philadelphia site first earmarked as a modern, high-tech police hub under former Mayor Michael Nutter. Kenney said Tuesday that rehabbing the stately Provident Mutual Life Insurance Co. building at 4601 Market St. - initially estimated to cost as much as $250 million - has been expensive, and that the property might be better suited for a "health-related campus" or other use. Since 1963, the police have been headquartered in the circular, three-story Police Administration Building at 750 Race St., popularly known as the Roundhouse.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
A coalition of media organizations, including the Inquirer and the Daily News, asked a judge Thursday to unseal court records surrounding settlements that Pennsylvania State University paid to accusers of Jerry Sandusky who said they told head football coach Joe Paterno or his assistants about their abuse as early as the 1970s. "Public interest in these proceedings is immense," attorneys for the news outlets contended in a motion filed in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court. The information in the records, attorney Craig J. Staudenmaier wrote, "may shed further needed light on a matter that is of serious public concern - sexual abuse of children over decades by an employee of the largest public university in the commonwealth.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Rosemary M. Kinsolving, 83, of Yeadon, an employee in the payroll and transportation departments of Philadelphia Media Network and its predecessor companies for more than four decades, died Friday, April 22, of heart failure at home. Mrs. Kinsolving was born in Southwest Philadelphia to Clarence and Margaret McGrail. She graduated from West Catholic High School for Girls in 1950. Three years later, she married Joseph F. Kinsolving Sr. The newlyweds bought their first home in Woodbury, but when they had the fourth of eight children, they moved to larger quarters in Yeadon.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
William M. Danson Jr. "hung out at Shibe Park a lot" when he was growing up, his wife, Edith, said. Living in the Paradise neighborhood, near 26th Street and Lehigh Avenue, before Shibe became Connie Mack Stadium in 1953, Mr. Danson and friends were always on the lookout for a free ticket from a fan. Besides, his wife said, "he passed Shibe Park every single day" at 21st and Lehigh, walking to classes at Northeast High School when it was at...
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Staff Writer
Five news organizations, including the parent company of the Inquirer, the Daily News, and Philly.com, on Friday urged the judge in Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's upcoming criminal trial to reject her request to file a key defense argument in secret. Kane has asked Montgomery County Court Judge Wendy Demchick-Alloy to permit her to file under seal a brief contending that she is the victim of a "selective and vindictive" prosecution. If her request is granted, her argument could be read only by the judge and Kane's prosecutors, not by the public.
NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Backlash over Gov. Christie's endorsement of Donald Trump continued to roll in Tuesday, with two newspapers that had backed the New Jersey governor's presidential bid expressing regret in editorials. "Boy, were we wrong," wrote Joseph W. McQuaid, publisher of the New Hampshire Union Leader, in a Page One editorial Tuesday. "Watching Christie kiss the Donald's ring this weekend - and make excuses for the man Christie himself had said was unfit for the presidency - demonstrated how wrong we were," McQuaid wrote.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Carlos N. Juarez, 42, of Rydal, a newspaperman who did not let his physical challenges define him, died Sunday, Feb. 21, of complications of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease at home. Mr. Juarez was born in Northeast Philadelphia and grew up in Huntingdon Valley. He graduated from Archbishop Ryan High School in 1992, and earned a degree in journalism from Temple University in 1998. For two decades, Mr. Juarez worked in the newspaper business as a copy editor, first at the Doylestown Intelligencer and for the past several years at the Bucks County Courier Times.
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