CollectionsNewspapers
IN THE NEWS

Newspapers

NEWS
December 28, 1994 | By JENNIFER WEINER
Just in time for the holidays comes a study bearing the un-startling news that newspapers and news magazines are doing a crummy job of appealing to young adults. The news is not a gift for editors. Under the tutelage of former USA Today editor Nancy Woodhull, 19 University of Rochester students spent a month scrutinizing four newspapers (two major metros, two medium-sized), Newsweek, Time and U.S. News & World Report. What they learned was that the only members of Generation X seeing their lives reflected on the page were athletes, celebrities and criminals.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Web surfers hunting this week for online versions of The Inquirer and at least nine other newspapers have risked landing, instead, on the Web site of an ex-Ku Klux Klanleader promoting white separatism. Unknown to the papers, someone in recent days registered Internet addresses that included part or all of the newspapers' names, then linked those addresses to the racist site. Anyone who typed one of the addresses - called domain names - into their Web browser in hopes of finding a news site saw gothic letters across the screen, and a black-and-white cross circled with the words "White Pride World Wide.
NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A First Amendment flap in central Pennsylvania was resolved Wednesday when a judge said two local newspapers were no longer under court order to delete archived news articles about 41 clients of a State College lawyer seeking to have their records expunged. The expungement orders will be revised to remove any reference to the Centre Daily Times and the Daily Collegian, the student paper at Pennsylvania State University, Centre County Judge Thomas Kistler said. "It was never anybody's intention to restrict" the papers, he said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
September 15, 2010 | By BOB WARNER, warnerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5885
The Daily News and Inquirer are going back on the auction block next week, after a potential sale to a group of hedge funds collapsed yesterday under opposition from Teamster delivery drivers. Federal bankruptcy Judge Stephen Raslavich ordered a new auction in his courtroom a week from tomorrow, without any contingencies for labor agreements. Greg Osberg, chief executive of the hedge-fund consortium that agreed last April to pay $105 million in cash for the newspapers, said the group intended to bid and prevail again, this time with more clout to deal with the balking Teamsters.
NEWS
August 3, 2010 | By ALEXIS GERARD FINGER
WHEN George W. Bush was president, many of us blamed him for all the problems our country had. We believed Barack Obama could stop the hemorrhaging of America's reputation abroad and provide the leadership we needed to reinvigorate our economy, create jobs, and modernize our approach to education, health care, energy, human rights and foreign policy. He was the presidential candidate whose ideals were so appealing and his commitment so convincing that even many Republicans believed he really could make a difference.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel Ginyard, 94, a former manager for a South Jersey car dealership and part-owner of two weekly newspapers in Philadelphia, died Thursday, May 30, at Wilmington Hospital of the Christiana Health Care System. He was a former Willingboro resident. Born in Orangeburg, S.C., Mr. Ginyard graduated from Central High School in Philadelphia, took business administration classes at Temple University, and enlisted in the Army in 1943. During 10 years of active duty, he served as a communications officer and a transportation officer, including for a time in Japan, nephew Philip Ginyard said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | By Arlene Notero Morgan
"It's how you know" is the latest in a string of advertising slogans adopted by The Inquirer to sell the benefits of reading the paper. Billboards, newspaper ads and radio spots are popping up, emphasizing the paper's local offerings and usefulness. Just a few years ago, journalists rarely participated in efforts to promote the paper. Now, many are involved in the planning, eager to go on air or have their pictures taken if it helps sell their reports. The turning point for me on the need to adopt more aggressive sales pitches came in 1994 during a workshop with grassroots neighborhood leaders.
NEWS
January 3, 2000 | By Arlene Notoro Morgan
Journalists have been watching efforts by the Los Angeles Times to build a new business model with a wary eye ever since former cereal executive Mark Willes started to adapt his marketing methods to the Times-Mirror newspaper dynasty. Would it be possible to safeguard the integrity of the newspaper's content when the new CEO was asking editors to tear down "the walls" that traditionally separated the news and business sides in his quest to sell more newspapers and grow profits?
NEWS
December 30, 2004 | By Joshua Schuster
What comes after information? Shift from repetition to reputation. Price of black milk rises. "Exclusivity, once the main purpose, has become a primary threat. " Critique of evolutionary reason. But being is not just about BEHAVING. A tree whose branches grow back into its roots. A film projected without light. A science of making citizens. A gift you can't even give once. Vulnerability unequally distributed across globe, see Page A7. An insurrection at the level of Page B10. A new use for "we"?
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|