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July 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia's tentative agreement with the owners of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com calls for no increase in health-care costs and the end of unpaid furloughs for Guild members, the union said. In an e-mail to its members Monday morning, the Guild announced that it had negotiated a two-year deal with Philadelphia Media Network that also included no changes to the health-care plan for at least the first year of the contract.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER MONTHS of contentious negotiations over health care and seniority rules, members of the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia last night authorized a strike if no resolution can be reached with the owner of the city's two daily newspapers and their website. "Striking is a last resort, and we certainly hope it doesn't come to that," Guild president Howard Gensler said at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel in Center City, where paper ballots were cast. "If it does, it's because the company forced the membership's hand.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the largest union representing employees at The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com voted Wednesday evening to authorize strike preparations as ongoing contract negotiations have yielded no breakthroughs. The vote - 263-19 in the main unit and 24-7 in the unit representing Philly.com employees - authorized the executive board of the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia to plan for a strike by 445 employees at the city's two largest newspapers and their companion website.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WANTED to see a face light up with a happy smile, all you had to do was say the words "Lou Voci' to anyone who had known the man even slightly. Lou Voci was a single-copy supervisor for the Daily News and Inquirer for more than 30 years, a man known for his devotion to his job, his meticulous attention to detail and a friendly nature that endeared him to everyone he met. "Everybody loved Lou," said Bob Palmo, retired regional manager in the newspapers' circulation department and Lou's onetime boss.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Don Schanche Jr., ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - Claude Sitton, 89, a newspaper journalist who set the pace for reporters covering the civil-rights movement in the South in the 1950s and '60s and later won a Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary, died Tuesday in Atlanta. He had been under hospice care with heart failure. Mr. Sitton, a Georgia native, began crisscrossing the South for the New York Times in 1958 and became a leading figure among the reporters covering the civil-rights struggle, said Hank Klibanoff, who cowrote The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle and the Awakening of a Nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THERE ONCE was a time that publishing lies was a bad thing. Now publishing truth is a bad thing. We're not talking about newspapers' or networks' political biases, or about charged issues for which people can have different opinions. We're referring to the ultra-Orthodox Israeli newspaper HaMevaser ("The Announcer"), which published the photo of world leaders linking arms at the Charlie Hebdo rally in Paris and photoshopped out the women - you know, like Angela Merkel , chancellor of that little European hamlet called Germany.
NEWS
November 28, 2014
THE FOLLOWING are excerpts from editorials around the country on the grand-jury decision in Ferguson: From the Los Angeles Times : . . . Just because Wilson will not face a trial does not mean that the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department has been vindicated or that no consequences will result from this episode. The department's nearly all-white force and its adoption of military-style equipment and tactics are reminiscent of a long-discredited Los Angeles Police Department, which learned the hard lessons of that combination in the early 1990s, when the city confronted . . . the beating of Rodney King.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MIKE EROH wasn't about to let being laid up at home stop him from doing his job. Mike was the senior home-delivery manager for the Daily News and Inquirer in South Jersey and he had a phone. While recovering from hernia surgery, Mike would get on that phone and call the warehouse in Turnersville, N.J., every day to find out what was going on, what the problems were and how to fix them. Unfortunately, Mike never made it back to work. He died Thursday of a massive heart attack.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James J. Marengo Sr., 88, of Lindenwold, an Inquirer pressman from 1956 to 1992, died of complications from liver and kidney diseases Saturday, Nov. 1, at Kennedy University Hospital in Washington Township. Mr. Marengo grew up near 13th and Mifflin Streets in South Philadelphia, graduated from South Philadelphia High School, and served in the Army of Occupation in Japan in the late 1940s, a daughter, Kathleen Cornwall, said. He had been a shipfitter's apprentice at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard before his Army service and returned to work there.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Since Newsies , the Walt-Disney-movie-turned-musical based on New York's Newsboy Strike of 1899 closes on Sunday, I will immediately say that if you like uplifting David-and-Goliath stories set to rousing music and filled with aggressive, gymnastics-propelled choreography, get tickets. Since Philadelphia also launches the 2014-15 national tour, I will offer my criticisms of a show that I enjoyed thoroughly, for as long as I could stand it. Alan Menken's music and Jack Feldman's lyrics strike a single note all night: yearning.
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