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NEWS
April 27, 1990 | By Idris M. Diaz and Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writers
City Councilman David Cohen yesterday introduced legislation that would require The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News to use specific amounts of recycled newsprint. The ordinance would apply only to newspapers that circulate at least five days per week and have a circulation of at least 10,000 in the city. Under that standard, the measure could also apply to the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, which have wide circulation in the city, according to Cohen's office.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Haverford and Radnor Townships each collected more than 2,000 tons of newsprint last year, among the highest totals in Delaware County, the county's recycling manager has reported. Haverford collected 2,675 tons of paper and Radnor 2,222 tons, which ranked second and third in the county. Upper Darby Township led all county municipalities with 2,963 tons, according to the recycling manager, Tom Kleber. However, on a per-household basis, Radnor ranked third with 471.98 pounds, behind Swarthmore Borough, with 561.13 pounds, and Brookhaven Borough, with 473.67 pounds.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Newsprint, once the bane of local towns because of its cost of disposal, is now a source of revenue, thanks to its emergence as a moneymaking recyclable. Half a dozen years ago, townships and boroughs were paying up to $25 a ton to have their paper hauled away as environmentally conscious residents glutted collection bins. Towns without recycling programs also had the added costs of paying fees to dump refuse paper at landfills. Now, companies such as ADA Environmental Services Inc. of Boothwyn, which has collected recyclables for nearly 100 years, are paying local governments up to $40 a ton to haul away all trash paper - junk mail, discarded newspapers, and magazines.
NEWS
June 26, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dennis M. Friel Sr., 47, a newsprint handler who loved riding his Harley and running in marathons, died Friday of injuries suffered when his motorcycle collided with a truck on Alleghenyville Road in Brecknock Township, Berks County. The accident, which is under investigation by the Brecknock Township Police Department, occurred several miles from Mr. Friel's home while he was en route to the Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. printing plant in Upper Merion Township. He was a work leader for newsprint handlers at the plant.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The cost of recycling newsprint is going up in Clifton Heights. PASCO, a Philadelphia newspaper recycling company that collects the borough's used newspaper, has informed borough officials that it will no longer pay for the newsprint. Instead, the company will now be charging the borough to take the paper away. Council President Ralph J. DeLucia announced PASCO's new policy during the council's business meeting Monday. "Due to a glut of used newspapers, the company has informed the borough that beginning Wednesday, PASCO is going to charge us $5 a ton to remove the paper," DeLucia said.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An engineer with a local rail line was killed Friday morning when an 1,800-pound roll of newsprint fell on him as he opened a railcar door to unload the paper at The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News' Schuylkill Printing Plant in Upper Merion. The engineer was identified as Jefferson L. Troester, 43, of Claymont, Del., who worked for the the Brandywine Valley Railroad Co. An Upper Merion & Plymouth Railroad train hauling six railcars loaded with the 4-foot-by-4-foot paper rolls pulled into the plant's railway siding Friday morning.
NEWS
December 17, 2010
Anthony G. (Tony) Del Beato, 92, of Brookhaven, a longtime newsprint warehouse foreman for The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, died Monday, Dec. 13, of natural causes at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Mr. Del Beato was a newsprint foreman for 40 years before retiring in 1988 at the age of 70. He started as a paper handler and worked his way up to foreman. He always worked the night shift, his family said. Born in Philadelphia, he lived in South Philadelphia for many years but moved in 2008 to Brookhaven, Delaware County.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The company that publishes the Daily News and the Inquirer said today it plans to use recycled paper in half its newsprint by 1995 - and in 90 percent by the year 2000. Robert J. Hall, publisher of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., said the company had decided to accept a challenge issued by Gov. Casey to the state's newspapers last fall. The PNI goal, similar to those adopted by several other Pennsylvania newspapers, holds only if acceptable-quality paper is available at competitive prices.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
A wrongful-death lawsuit was filed Tuesday in Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas by the estate of a Delaware man who died last May when a roll of newsprint about to be unloaded from a train car at the Inquirer and Daily News printing plant in Upper Merion fell on him. The suit was filed on behalf of Sarah Troester of Wilmington, administrator of the estate of her husband, Jefferson. He was an assistant engineer employed by Arcellor-Mittal Railways Inc. at the time of his death, according to the lawsuit.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
By Ken Yeager's figuring, somewhere out there at least 43,680 trees can thank his Boy Scouts for their lives. From now on, though, the woods will have to get along without him. After 28 years spent collecting old newsprint and selling it to finance the activities of Troop 7 in Malvern, Scoutmaster Yeager has discovered that paper drives are dead, a victim of that fundamental capitalist principle, the law of supply and demand. So even though Yeager's scouts collected more than 4,368 tons of newsprint since 1960 - 10 trees a ton by his calculation - "We are going to stop because there is no money in it," said Yeager's wife, Elaine.
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NEWS
February 21, 2013
A wrongful-death lawsuit was filed Tuesday in Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas by the estate of a Delaware man who died last May when a roll of newsprint about to be unloaded from a train car at the Inquirer and Daily News printing plant in Upper Merion fell on him. The suit was filed on behalf of Sarah Troester of Wilmington, administrator of the estate of her husband, Jefferson. He was an assistant engineer employed by Arcellor-Mittal Railways Inc. at the time of his death, according to the lawsuit.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A memorial service is scheduled on Thursday for Jefferson Troester, 43, of Claymont, Del., who fulfilled a childhood dream by becoming a train engineer in 2010 and died Friday when a roll of newsprint fell on him as he opened a railcar door at the Inquirer and Daily News' printing plant in Upper Merion. Troester graduated from Oxford Area High School in Chester County, served in the Air Force, and worked in automotive repair, as a welder, and as a millwright before he was hired by the Upper Merion & Plymouth Railroad, his family said Monday.
NEWS
May 19, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A railroad worker was killed today when he was crushed by an 1,800-pound roll of newsprint at the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News Schuylkill Printing Plant in Upper Merion. Mark Block, a spokesman for Philadelphia Media Network, the newspapers' parent company, said the roll apparently had shifted in its boxcar during shipment and fell out about 9:30 a.m. when the train's engineer opened the door. Jefferson L. Troester, 43, of Claymont, Del., was employed by the Brandywine Valley Railroad Co. Block said PMN officials were saddened to learn of Troester's death at the plant on River Road.
NEWS
December 17, 2010
Anthony G. (Tony) Del Beato, 92, of Brookhaven, a longtime newsprint warehouse foreman for The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, died Monday, Dec. 13, of natural causes at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Mr. Del Beato was a newsprint foreman for 40 years before retiring in 1988 at the age of 70. He started as a paper handler and worked his way up to foreman. He always worked the night shift, his family said. Born in Philadelphia, he lived in South Philadelphia for many years but moved in 2008 to Brookhaven, Delaware County.
NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think the National Constitution Center will display the formal, handwritten U.S. Constitution? Think again. To see the four-page parchment, you'll have to go to the National Archives in Washington. And you'll have to wait until September to see it because it is undergoing a massive renovation and getting a snazzy argon-gas-filled box. What Philadelphia's museum will have is a newspaper copy, but not just any newspaper. The double-sided, two-page Sept. 19, 1787, Pennsylvania Packet gave the masses their first glimpse of their new government.
NEWS
June 26, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dennis M. Friel Sr., 47, a newsprint handler who loved riding his Harley and running in marathons, died Friday of injuries suffered when his motorcycle collided with a truck on Alleghenyville Road in Brecknock Township, Berks County. The accident, which is under investigation by the Brecknock Township Police Department, occurred several miles from Mr. Friel's home while he was en route to the Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. printing plant in Upper Merion Township. He was a work leader for newsprint handlers at the plant.
NEWS
March 12, 2001 | By Lillian Swanson
It's clear to me that newspapers nationwide are in for a bumpy economic ride, with the "fasten-seat-belt" sign likely to remain lit for the rest of the year. Newspapers are a highly profitable, but cyclical, business. Their biggest costs are labor, followed by newsprint. Advertising revenues put fuel in a newspaper's tank. The price of the paper is important, too, but circulation has been declining at many papers, including this one, for a decade. Right now, the newspaper business cycle is pointing downward for two reasons: A 17 percent rise in newsprint prices has hit at the same time as a slide in advertising revenue.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | By Zachary Stalberg
Since you are unaccustomed to reading news in this space, I thought I'd better put it up front where you could see it: The Philadelphia Daily News, ending its first full year with a relatively high and unwieldy cover price, has somehow held on to most of its readers. The paper's daily paid sale stands at about 180,000, which translates to about a half-million readers per day. And the same Daily News went from red ink in 1995 to a profit margin of about 10 percent in 1996. That's more than you get from your passbook and more than many businesses can boast.
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was easy money. And it poured into the coffers of Lower and Central Bucks municipalities by the thousands. Bristol Township received $141,000. Middletown Township collected about the same. All for old newspapers. More than a year ago, Otter Recycling Co. contracted to pay 13 Bucks County municipalities a minimum of $35 a ton for their old newspapers for the next five years. Municipalities, long accustomed to paying to get rid of their recyclables, thought they had struck gold.
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