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NEWS
October 2, 1996 | by Joe O'Dowd and Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writers
A West Philadelphia newsstand operator was shot in the back during a dispute yesterday morning with a police officer. George Major, 62, of Nedro Street near Broad, was in stable condition last night at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania with a bullet wound to his lower back. The officer, Gerard McPhillips, 42, a seven-year veteran assigned to the 18th Police District, was taken off street duty pending an investigation, said Commissioner Richard Neal. Two men who said they witnessed the shooting at 52nd and Market streets, but did not want to give their names, said Major - known as "Ali" to customers of his wooden stand under the Market-Frankford El - had his hands up and his back to the officer when the shot was fired.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Patrons of some Philadelphia newsstands had to dig out an extra two cents to buy copies of the Daily News and Inquirer yesterday. The newspapers didn't raise prices, but 41 newsstands began charging 37 cents instead of the 35-cent price printed on the front of the papers. The news dealers, mostly in Center City, said the extra two pennies cover increases in the wholesale prices of the papers. Most other retail news outlets, including vending machines, continued charging 35 cents for the newspapers.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martin I. Rudnitsky, 63, better known as "Marty," a newsstand operator who called du Ponts by their first names, sold cigars to the stars, and once got himself arrested to protest censorship laws, died Tuesday at his residence in Wilmington. Since 1973, Mr. Rudnitsky had owned and operated the Smoke Shop at Delaware and DuPont Streets, which is something of an institution in Wilmington. In the 1960s, he had presided over another such institution in Camden, a newsstand called Shorty's.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Magazine distributor Robert B. Cohen, who built the Hudson News chain of newsstands from one store at LaGuardia Airport and changed the way travelers spend their downtime, has died at age 86. Cohen was already a giant in the magazine and newspaper distribution business when he decided to launch a retail chain in 1987. His stores were a break from the claustrophobic newsstands of the past, boasting hundreds of magazines instead of just a few dozen, with tall racks and bright lighting that invited customers to browse.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fall asserts itself in the early chill of morning, but no more than the bees do, swarming pestily around the doughnuts and coffee on the counter at Berman's Newstand. Customers swarm around at this hour, too, drawn by the same doughnuts and coffee but also by the stacks of newspapers and by habit and a sense of continuity and, of course, by the lottery tickets. "You're wastin' your money," a man says to several others lined up at the ticket window. "I done got the winning ticket already.
NEWS
November 10, 2000 | by Dana DiFilippo, Daily News Staff Writer
The rush-hour attack was swift and vicious. A man hurled acid in a newsstand owner's face in Center City yesterday and then trotted down a nearby stairway to a subway, where he escaped. Investigators were trying to determine whether the culprit was a deranged sicko acting randomly or a calculating avenger with a twisted mission in mind. Ayalnesh Abay, 44, of 69th Street near Dicks Avenue, Southwest Philadelphia, was being treated at Temple University Hospital for severe burns to her face and chest.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Hurry, hurry, hurry. The fast-food industry discovered that sales would get a boost by offering customers the speed of service provided by a drive-through window. Banks, too, found that many customers liked drive-throughs to avoid standing in long lines. Now, a pair of Pennsylvania entrepreneurs, eyeing a money-making venture in the newspaper vending business, are latching on to the idea. Scott Biltz and Ken Beck have paired their business backgrounds to create the drive-through newsstand.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | by Dave Racher Daily News Staff Writer
Her face has been forever scarred by a demon who attacked her so violently that she can no longer see the world the same way again. But Ayalnesh Abay has yet to see justice. After a court proceeding yesterday, the 45-year-old former Center City newsstand operator, partially blinded and wearing sunglasses, asked Assistant District Attorney Thomas Lipscomb if cops had caught the man who threw lye in her face as she worked in her newsstand last November. "No," replied Lipscomb.
NEWS
November 11, 1996 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ask Garry McAdams about the all-new Avenue of the Arts, that fine promenade of granite and gleaming pavement and fancy streetlights stretching in both directions from City Hall on Broad Street. Then stand back. "I've been crushed like a grape," said McAdams, whose newsstand at the northwest corner of Broad and Locust Streets faces the sidewalk along a stretch of the $15 million project, which commands its own page in the Rendell administration's brag book. "The Avenue of the Arts is new, and that's all that matters right now. " That means conformity.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE 1955 CHEVY was a classic example of sleek automotive design. And it was fast, powered by Chevrolet's first V-8 engine. Roland Price Sharpe Jr. worked hard on his '55, rebuilding it and freshening up the paint so that he could show it off to his pals in West Philadelphia who were working on their own cars. They would take their prized vehicles to a street in South Philadelphia where they would display them, and also, not exactly legally, race when the cops weren't looking.
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NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE 1955 CHEVY was a classic example of sleek automotive design. And it was fast, powered by Chevrolet's first V-8 engine. Roland Price Sharpe Jr. worked hard on his '55, rebuilding it and freshening up the paint so that he could show it off to his pals in West Philadelphia who were working on their own cars. They would take their prized vehicles to a street in South Philadelphia where they would display them, and also, not exactly legally, race when the cops weren't looking.
NEWS
September 29, 2012
In City Council's ongoing effort to find more places to allow advertising - and to raise more money for the city's coffers - Councilman William K. Greenlee introduced a bill Thursday to allow newsstands to sell digital advertising on all sides and to permit ads on vinyl wrapping on newsstands. The bill would impose a 7 percent excise tax, consistent with taxes already charged for advertising on private property. "Allowing for enhanced advertising on newsstands is a win-win for the city, as it generates more revenue and helps small-business owners become more successful," Greenlee said in a statement.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Magazine distributor Robert B. Cohen, who built the Hudson News chain of newsstands from one store at LaGuardia Airport and changed the way travelers spend their downtime, has died at age 86. Cohen was already a giant in the magazine and newspaper distribution business when he decided to launch a retail chain in 1987. His stores were a break from the claustrophobic newsstands of the past, boasting hundreds of magazines instead of just a few dozen, with tall racks and bright lighting that invited customers to browse.
NEWS
April 4, 2011
THANKS TO THE Middle East Media Research Institute, which puts a magnifying glass on the world's most poisonous neighborhood (sign up for free at memri.org), I got the latest copy of al Qaeda's magazine - yes, the global terrorists have a magazine - and the first thing I think is, "Are they hiring?" I wonder if al Qaeda pays better than the Huffington Post, which gloms almost everything for free. Or the Daily News ? Or the Philadelphia Gay News ? I believe the mag is only online (because if you bought it at a newsstand, the FBI would follow you home)
NEWS
September 22, 2008 | By Fabian Loehe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 3:17 p.m., Joe Biden, the longtime U.S. senator from Delaware, steps off the Acela train at the Wilmington Amtrak station - and rushes back to say goodbye to the conductor. Then, walking down the station steps, he catches sight of an Amtrak ticket agent he hasn't seen in four years. "How have you been?" Biden enthusiastically asks Saketha Martin, 42, now based in New York. Since Biden became a vice presidential candidate, Democrats have pointed to his commute as a metaphor for his accessibility and down-home style.
NEWS
June 11, 2008
AFTER GOING TO the newsstand on June 4, as until recently I did daily, I was shocked, incensed and appalled at the cover choice of the Daily News. I found the absence of a Barack Obama victory photo outrageous! This flew in the face of just how historic an occasion that night was. The paper chose to lampoon Hillary Clinton rather than emblazon its cover with a photo of a man who reflects to the hilt everything the United States is supposed to represent. You took a magical, wondrous and encouraging moment and turned it into so much rubble by choosing that cover.
NEWS
May 26, 2007 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stanton Elementary School in North Philadelphia has collected national accolades for improving student test scores, hosted a visit by U.S. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings, and been profiled in a new book from Harvard Education Press. Now, Stanton and nearby Blaine Elementary School are featured in a Time cover article about how the federal No Child Left Behind Act is affecting schools nationwide. A Time spokesman said the June 4 issue was scheduled to be on newsstands today.
SPORTS
July 20, 2006 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Expectations for the Eagles are at a 21st-century low as the team opens training camp today at Lehigh University. It's not that the Eagles don't believe they can rebound from the disastrous season in which they tumbled from the top of the NFC to the bottom of the NFC East. It's just that few people outside Philadelphia believe that the Eagles are going to regain their status as one of the NFL's elite teams. In recent years, the Eagles went into the season as the overwhelming favorites to win the NFC East and were picked by many to win the NFC championship.
SPORTS
April 16, 2006 | By Dylan Purcell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The market for magazines previewing the April 29-30 NFL draft is growing faster than the list of teams Terrell Owens can never again report to. ESPN has published its first-ever standalone draft guide, and the newsstand even includes a draft primer for kids. All the magazines glorify Reggie Bush, and any of them will help fans distinguish a D'Brickashaw from a Kiwanuka. But how do they grade out head-to-head? Here's our pre-draft scouting report: Top pick: Sporting News Pro Football Draft Guide 2006 The Sporting News has published a no-frills draft guide since 1999 with an emphasis on how talent may translate to the NFL rather than on gaudy college statistics.
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