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NEWS
April 23, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Used to be every self-respecting big-city train station had to have four things: a newsstand, a walk-in barbershop, a bootblack, and a bar. As of today, SEPTA's Suburban Station - once the Pennsylvania Railroad's gateway to the Main Line - has a newsstand. Vincent's Barber Shop is no more. Yesterday afternoon, after the last man left the shop in the 17th Street section of the station concourse, Vincent Ionata switched off his two swirling, striped barber poles for the last time, and a 75-year-old constant to generations of Philadelphia mayors, politicians and businessmen went dark.
SPORTS
April 15, 1993 | by Steve Weiser, Special to the Daily News
We're almost two weeks into the baseball season and Orlando Magic rookie Shaquille O'Neal is still hotter than any baseball player and hotter than any cards in the comic book market. But the story getting the most media attention is the resurrection of Superman. Superman returned this week with issue No. 500, "Adventures of Superman. " Four different beings have simultaneously returned, all claiming to be the Man of Steel. Any one of these guys could be the real Superman, or perhaps none of them is. Superman died last November in a battle with Doomsday.
NEWS
April 4, 2011
THANKS TO THE Middle East Media Research Institute, which puts a magnifying glass on the world's most poisonous neighborhood (sign up for free at memri.org), I got the latest copy of al Qaeda's magazine - yes, the global terrorists have a magazine - and the first thing I think is, "Are they hiring?" I wonder if al Qaeda pays better than the Huffington Post, which gloms almost everything for free. Or the Daily News ? Or the Philadelphia Gay News ? I believe the mag is only online (because if you bought it at a newsstand, the FBI would follow you home)
NEWS
September 18, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In the early 1900s, a certain kind of traffic jam was common in many small towns in Chester County. It happened whenever a troupe of entertainers came to town, bringing along fleets of scenery and even live animals by the train-car load. These groups had nothing to do with the circus, though. The elaborate stage sets that floated through the streets - "on a daily basis," as one newspaper reporter in West Chester observed in 1907 - were headed for the local opera house. Before movie houses, residents came in droves to such places for what was known as "dramatic entertainments.
LIVING
January 25, 1993 | This story includes information from Reuters, the Los Angeles Times, Women's Wear Daily, the Associated Press and the New York Daily News
Is hot hot Dana Carvey frustrated that his next film project fell through? Just ask his handlers: "There's so much going on with this guy, who knows?" But not so cavalier are the not-so-hot-anymore filmmakers Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer, involved with Bad Boys, which was to begin shooting for Hollywood Pictures next month with Carvey and fellow Saturday Night Live alum Jon Lovitz. While Carvey's been flooded with offers and deals - as host of a David Letterman replacement show on NBC and two SNL spinoff movies, Wayne's World 2 and a Hans and Franz project, to name three - the Bad Boys producers must cool their heels because they need a workable script, their star, and another green light from Walt Disney Studios, whose Hollywood Pictures division is bankrolling the $20 million project.
SPORTS
March 5, 1990 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Already, Sports Illustrated has mentioned him in a story about recruiting. Already, Channel 10 has given him prominent air time in a feature on the same subject. His name is Rasheed Wallace. He is 6-8, 185 pounds. He is a freshman at Simon Gratz High. And yesterday, at a nearly packed McGonigle Hall, he garnered another highly impressive "already. " He already has starred in a championship game. By shooting 10-for-15 from the field and 3-for-4 from the foul line for 23 points, and grabbing a team-high seven rebounds, Wallace helped to lead Gratz past Franklin Learning Center, 80-60, for its first Public League title since 1939.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contributing to this article were Inquirer staff writers Craig R. McCoy, Doreen Carvajal, Laurie Hollman, Sergio R. Bustos, Reid Kanaley and Bill Ordine, and correspondents Karen McAllister and Michelle R. Davis
There will be 450,000 stories out there in the naked city should SEPTA drivers strike on Sunday. And how Frank Dezzi gets to his accordion lesson will be one of them. Dezzi was waiting for a bus outside the Frankford Station on Wednesday morning, bundled against the elements in a raincoat, navy blue watch cap and galoshes, and fortifying himself with a bag of soft pretzels as he pondered this dilemma: With city buses, trolley cars and subways trains potentially out of commission, how would the 39-year-old from Overbrook Park in West Philadelphia reach his weekly appointment near Roosevelt Mall in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writers Vanessa Williams, Terence Samuel, Edward Colimore, Daniel Rubin, Fawn Vrazo and Amy S. Rosenberg contributed to this article
From north to south, rowhouse to skybox, Two Street to Cecil B. Moore, people remembered Frank Rizzo. They remembered grasping his broad hand, shouting a greeting, serving him a meal, laughing at a quip, loathing him, loving him. All over the city yesterday, it seemed that Frank Rizzo - brash, irreverent, bigger than legend - had just lumbered away. Rizzo posters hung from splintering telephone poles in the Italian Market. Rizzo Polaroids smiled from the cashier's box in the Oregon Diner.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
With the holiday travel season approaching its peak and airline safety concerns running high, travelers should be prepared to find airport regulations more tightly enforced this year. Airport managers say that passengers have adjusted to stricter enforcement and that wait times have not gotten out of control. Even so, this is not a good time to arrive at the airport at the last minute, because lines at the security points almost certainly will be long during peak periods. Anticipating the following security measures will help speed you along, according to the Federal Aviation Administration: Bring photo identification with you. While many airlines were sporadically checking IDs last year, most of them are vigilant this year.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We're sorry. That has been the message from several prominent news organizations over the last month or so, as one after another has served up a humiliating apology and admitted that what it's been saying just isn't true. It was CNN's turn yesterday, retracting its recent scoop that the U.S. military used deadly nerve gas on American defectors in Laos. CNN's slipup came after: Former New Republic writer Stephen Glass, fired in May, was found to have invented all or part of 27 articles and fabricated notes, Web sites and other evidence to dupe the magazine's fact-checkers.
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