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NEWS
May 23, 2005 | By David Brooks
Maybe it won't be so bad being cut off from the blogosphere. I look around the Web these days and find that Newsweek's retracted atrocity story has sent everybody into cloud-cuckoo-land. Every faction up and down the political spectrum has used the magazine's blunder as a chance to open fire on its favorite targets, turning this into a fevered hunting season for the straw men. Many of my friends on the right have decided that the Newsweek episode exposes the rotten core of the liberal media.
NEWS
May 21, 2005
Some tensions are good. Tension between government and journalism, for example, can contribute to a stronger democracy that is more accessible to its citizens. That tension has been on vivid display lately due to the controversy surrounding one sentence in the May 9 edition of Newsweek. This sentence said U.S. government investigators had concluded that interrogators at the Guant?namo Bay detention center flushed the Muslim holy book, the Koran, down a toilet. Soon after its publication, opponents of the United States in Afghanistan and Pakistan were using the report to ignite riots in which people died.
NEWS
May 23, 2005 | MICHELLE MALKIN
IF YOU WANT to get an earful, ask a soldier how he feels about our news media. You'll hear an outpouring of dismay and outrage over antagonistic and reckless reporting. I have stacks of letters and e-mails from soldiers and their families sharing those frustrations. During Vietnam, those sentiments got packed away - private hurts to be silently borne for decades. Today, the Internet has allowed soldiers on the front to disseminate their views - breaking through the media's entrenched, anti-military bias - in unprecedented ways.
NEWS
August 19, 2012
Karl Fleming, 84, a former Newsweek reporter who dodged bullets and choked on tear gas while covering some of the most momentous events of the civil rights era, died on Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. The cause was respiratory illness, his son Charles said. Mr. Fleming was in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963, when Gov. George C. Wallace fulfilled his pledge to "stand in the schoolhouse door" and then stepped aside when handed a presidential order to allow two black students to enroll at the University of Alabama.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Frank Kummer, Breaking News Desk
The once-iconic Newsweek announced today that it will issue its last print edition on Dec. 31 and transition to an all-digital format focused on paid content. The move is the latest in a string of once-dominant print publications to either limit or halt print production in favor of digital content. The announcement was made by Tina Brown, editor-in-chief and founder of The Newsweek Daily Beast Co. - a partnership formed two years ago in a merger. Brown said on thedailybeast.com that Newsweek, "will expand its rapidly growing tablet and online presence, as well as its successful global partnerships and events business.
NEWS
May 23, 2005
I HAD TO laugh when I read about Newsweek's decision to retract its erroneous story regarding the Koran being flushed down a toilet at Guantanamo. It's ironic that Donald Rumsfeld said, "People lost their lives. " Maybe the article was careless and did result in lives being lost, but Newsweek didn't decide to send U.S. troops to Iraq to fight and die. How many lives have been lost over there (military and civilian) due to decisions made by Rumsfeld and the Bush administration?
NEWS
May 24, 2005
IUNDERSTAND that an article in Newsweek has inflamed the Arab world against us. Gee, I thought they already hated our guts but evidently I've been lied to by the mainstream media. Now it's all coming clear. Why in the world would they hate us when we were good enough to send our troops into Iraq for the sole purpose of bringing democracy to that country? They aren't stupid. They know that we have 1,600 dead, thousands wounded and that we are shelling out a billion dollars a week to bring them the kind of life they deserve.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2012
"The seeds for what appears to be a very robust remodeling recovery have been planted. " - Harvard University Center for Joint Housing Studies, on increased investment in the home remodelers Home Depot Inc. and Lowe's Cos. "We may sharply curtail our hiring, and our total employment in corporate functions may begin to fall as we have voluntary turnover within the company. " - CEO Gary Kelly on Southwest Airlines Co.'s plans to contend with rising fuel prices and weaker travel demand.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | BY CAL THOMAS
I confess to never having heard of the actor Hugh Grant until he was arrested for what police said was committing a "lewd act" with a prostitute in Los Angeles June 27. But in a town and a nation where celebrity has replaced fame as the highest goal (the former reflecting nothing of substance and the latter reflecting steady achievement), Grant can fire his publicist. His celebrity is now multigenerational and worldwide. On the "Tonight Show" July 10, Grant said something curious: "I think you know in life what's a good thing to do and what's a bad thing.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Monica Lewinsky sent Linda Tripp electronic mail in which the former White House intern talked about her alleged affair with President Clinton, Newsweek magazine reported in its latest issue. In the messages last year, Lewinsky referred to two neckties she said she had given Clinton as gifts and griped that the "Big Creep didn't even try to call me on V-Day (Valentine's Day)," the magazine said in its issue going on sale today. Clinton has vehemently denied allegations, under investigation by independent counsel Kenneth Starr, that he had an affair with Lewinsky and told her to lie about it. Tripp, who worked with Lewinsky at the Pentagon, secretly tape-recorded conversations with Lewinsky and turned them over to Starr's investigators.
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NEWS
June 25, 2013
John L. Dotson Jr., 76, a longtime journalist, editor, and newspaper publisher who championed diversity in the newsroom, died Friday in Boulder, Colo., of mantle cell lymphoma, his family said. During his long career, Mr. Dotson held a number of top positions, including at The Inquirer, where in the 1980s he was director of night operations for a time. He also was an editor at Newsweek and the publisher of two newspapers, including the Akron (Ohio) Beacon Journal when it won a Pulitzer Prize in 1994.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Saturday Evening Post , once America's most popular magazine and lately a nostalgic bimonthly found in Midwestern doctors' offices, is scheduling a return from exile in Indiana to offices near its old headquarters on Washington Square - along with its 191-year archive and, maybe, its $70 million art collection. The Post is back with a new design, new fiction, and reporting. "We'll be Vanity Fair meets Smithsonian ," says the Post's new editor, Steve Slon , who cofounded Men's Health magazine for Emmaus, Pa.-based Rodale Press and was editor of AARP's 40 million-circulation member magazine before joining Post publisher Joan SerVaas . "The magazine in the last 30 years was relying on nostalgia, tradition, the good old days.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
The Good Girls Revolt How the Women of Newsweek Sued Their Bosses and Changed the Workplace By Lynn Povich Public Affairs. 288 pp. $25.99 Reviewed by MarySheila McDonald   On March 16, 1970, an ironic coincidence unfolded at Newsweek magazine: a provocative cover story headlined "Women in Revolt" examined women's dissatisfaction with their role in society and 46 female staffers filed a sex discrimination complaint with the EEOC. The women alleged that females were "systematically discriminated against in both hiring and promotion and forced to assume a subsidiary role.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2012
"The seeds for what appears to be a very robust remodeling recovery have been planted. " - Harvard University Center for Joint Housing Studies, on increased investment in the home remodelers Home Depot Inc. and Lowe's Cos. "We may sharply curtail our hiring, and our total employment in corporate functions may begin to fall as we have voluntary turnover within the company. " - CEO Gary Kelly on Southwest Airlines Co.'s plans to contend with rising fuel prices and weaker travel demand.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Frank Kummer, Breaking News Desk
The once-iconic Newsweek announced today that it will issue its last print edition on Dec. 31 and transition to an all-digital format focused on paid content. The move is the latest in a string of once-dominant print publications to either limit or halt print production in favor of digital content. The announcement was made by Tina Brown, editor-in-chief and founder of The Newsweek Daily Beast Co. - a partnership formed two years ago in a merger. Brown said on thedailybeast.com that Newsweek, "will expand its rapidly growing tablet and online presence, as well as its successful global partnerships and events business.
NEWS
August 19, 2012
Karl Fleming, 84, a former Newsweek reporter who dodged bullets and choked on tear gas while covering some of the most momentous events of the civil rights era, died on Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. The cause was respiratory illness, his son Charles said. Mr. Fleming was in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963, when Gov. George C. Wallace fulfilled his pledge to "stand in the schoolhouse door" and then stepped aside when handed a presidential order to allow two black students to enroll at the University of Alabama.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Alexandra Petri
‘Are Millennials the Screwed Generation?" Newsweek wants to know. It thinks we are. It has statistics. It has pictures of doleful-looking members of the millennial generation. Frankly, I am sick of being told by people twice my age that they are screwing me over. I already knew that. The boomers keep leaving me with large bills — the kind I am expected to pay when they die, after receiving decades of the Most Expensive Care Available, because the boomers have been coddled and told over and over that they are the All-Singing, All-Dancing, Most World-Defining Generation Ever, for whom the check will never come.
NEWS
November 26, 2011
Christopher Ma, 61, a new-media pioneer who pushed the Washington Post Co. to launch the free daily Express tabloid, died Wednesday of a heart attack in New York. Mr. Ma was the Post's senior vice president for development. A veteran journalist, he was a Washington correspondent for Newsweek and an editor at U.S. News and World Report. He joined the Post in 1997. He is credited with expanding the Post beyond the traditional newspaper. He launched the profitable Express tabloid in 2003, which now has a print run of more than 180,000 and guided the purchase of the Spanish-language El Tiempo Latino in 2004.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - The hotel maid accusing Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in a Manhattan hotel room broke her silence yesterday, saying in a published report that the former International Monetary Fund leader grabbed and attacked her as she urged him to stop. "I said, 'Sir, stop this. I don't want to lose my job.' He said, 'You're not going to lose your job,' " Nafissatou Diallo told Newsweek in a cover story posted online yesterday. ABC News said it would broadcast an interview with her on three of its programs today.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - The hotel maid accusing Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexually assaulting her in a Manhattan hotel room broke her silence Sunday, saying in a published report that the former International Monetary Fund leader grabbed and attacked her as she implored him to stop. "I said, 'Sir, stop this. I don't want to lose my job.' He said, 'You're not going to lose your job,' " Nafissatou Diallo told Newsweek in a cover story posted online Sunday. ABC News said it would broadcast an interview with her on three of its programs Monday.
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