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SPORTS
August 19, 1990 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Your feet comfy in official NFL slippers and propped up on your official NFL team pillow, with your official NFL pewter mug or perhaps your official NFL plastic tankard filled and close at hand, you check your official NFL wall clock. Yes, it's almost time for another televised NFL game. Football is in the air. Indeed, the air in your TV room is scented with official NFL air freshener as well as the musty odor of the family dog in his official NFL pet collar. Clearly, football is more than just a game.
SPORTS
September 19, 1995 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The NFL is taking its fight with Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones to court. The league filed a $300 million lawsuit in federal court in New York yesterday against Jones and the Cowboys. The suit accuses the Cowboys of violating their agreement with the league's marketing arm, NFL Properties, by signing side deals with Nike and Pepsi. A hearing on the suit was scheduled for Thursday. The suit was filed following a unanimous vote of the five club executives who oversee NFL Properties.
SPORTS
November 7, 1995 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones filed a $750 million suit against the NFL in federal court in New York yesterday, accusing the league of blocking teams from conducting their own marketing. The suit asked the court, under federal antitrust laws, to dismantle what it called "the unlawful cartel" used by the NFL in marketing its trademarks and logos. In September, the league and NFL Properties sued Jones and the Cowboys for $300 million over his recent private marketing deals with Nike, Pepsi and American Express.
SPORTS
March 11, 1994 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
Buddy Ryan has found himself in the eye of another storm. No, he hasn't taken another swing at Kevin Gilbride. The Phoenix Cardinals coach is going after bigger fish this time. He's taking on the NFL owners and their merchandising arm, NFL Properties. The dispute centers around the brand of outerwear that Ryan will wear on the sideline this season. Until last year, NFL coaches were able to cut their own deals with outerwear companies over what they wore on the sideline, much like college basketball coaches do with sneaker companies.
SPORTS
October 16, 1991 | By Glen Macnow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The incessant war between NFL owners and players is being fought on a new front - sports-card stores. In a battle that involves millions of dollars in royalty fees, the NFL Players Association is suing the league over - of all things - football cards. At issue is who owns the rights to players' names and faces. The skirmish might seem silly if not for the money involved. The Players Association, which has long served as the licensing agent for the NFL's 1,500 players, netted $11.6 million last year from the sale of football cards, games and T-shirts.
SPORTS
March 31, 1992 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Defensive lineman Mike Golic of the Eagles was one of four defendants named in a suit filed on Friday by the NFL Players Association, which said that the four had signed away their licensing rights to a company controlled by NFL owners. The lawsuit, filed in Superior Court in Hackensack, N.J., names Golic, center Bart Oates and offensive tackle Eric Moore of the New York Giants and quarterback Neil O'Donnell of the Pittsburgh Steelers. The suit accuses the players of breaching an agreement to provide the NFLPA with exclusive rights to use their images on trading cards, T-shirts and other items.
SPORTS
November 14, 1990 | By Glen Macnow, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a league meeting in Dallas today, NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue will try to persuade team owners to increase his authority. If he is successful, Tagliabue, who would then be the most powerful commissioner in football history, hopes to break the league's three-year labor deadlock. According to league sources, Tagliabue will move to take control of the NFL Management Council - which oversees labor relations - as well as NFL Properties and NFL Films. Those three entities are now headed by committees of owners, who will be asked to vote to give their authority to the commissioner.
SPORTS
November 12, 1997 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Matthew Kilrain filled out the contest coupon for a chance to play football with NFL Pro Bowlers Emmitt Smith and Curtis Martin, dropped it in the entry box, and then forgot all about it. "I never thought I would win," 12-year-old Matthew recalled. But yesterday, three months after entering the contest, there he was, on a football field at Our Lady of Calvary School in Northeast Philadelphia with 19 of his friends and a couple of cousins, going over plays with the Dallas Cowboys' star running back.
SPORTS
July 28, 1994 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
Reggie White is getting sick and tired of listening to players continually rip NFL Players Association chief Gene Upshaw and the new free agency system. He is getting sick and tired of listening to players suggest that Upshaw sold them out. "The players that are criticizing Gene and the Players Association need to take their behinds out to Maui (site of the NFLPA's annual convention) and sit in some of those meetings and ask questions and let them know to their faces how they feel instead of talking to them in the newspapers," said the Green Bay Packers defensive end. "The people that are complaining the loudest now are the same people who never bothered to go to meetings and find out what was going on before.
SPORTS
December 18, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Three Michigan football players were suspended for team violations and will miss the Holiday Bowl, coach Gary Moeller said yesterday. Linebacker Trevor Pryce; wide receiver, kick-returner Seth Smith; and free safety Earnest Sanders were suspended for violations Moeller refused to discuss, but he stressed that the violations were unrelated. Bruce Madej, director of athletic public relations at Michigan, said "team violations" covers a wide range of infractions, including such things as academic problems, being in a fight, and missing team meetings.
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SPORTS
February 23, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
A federal judge has upheld a jury's verdict that the Baltimore Ravens copied their logo design from a security guard, who sued the NFL franchise for $10 million. In an opinion dated Feb. 19, U.S. District Judge Marvin Garbis denied the team's request for a new trial, saying the jury's verdict last November was "supported by adequate evidence. " He also rejected the defense lawyers' suggestion that one juror was coerced by a deadlocked panel into deciding in favor of security guard Frederick Bouchat.
SPORTS
February 17, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
New England Patriots running back Robert Edwards's return to football was in doubt yesterday after doctors discovered nerve damage in his lower leg while performing surgery on his left knee. Edwards had the four-hour surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital after injuring himself in a beach flag football game. After rushing for 1,115 yards as a rookie last season, he will miss the entire 1999 season. Doctors were able to repair damage done to four knee ligaments, but also found the nerve damage, the team said in a statement.
SPORTS
October 7, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Artists hurrying to create a logo for the Baltimore Ravens stole the design from a security guard who faxed a drawing to the Maryland Stadium Authority, his attorney said in a $10 million federal lawsuit. Attorneys for the Ravens and the NFL, meanwhile, said in their opening statement that the team's logo was developed by artists working for NFL Properties, Inc. In his suit, Frederick Bouchat claims while working at the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, in the spring of 1996, he decorated a Cleveland Browns helmet with a logo he designed and placed it on his desk in the building's lobby.
SPORTS
May 21, 1998 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
After years of reluctance, Major League Baseball finally granted a license for a complete run of collectible uniform-sleeve patches that were released to the market this month. "There were always people who collected baseball patches, but it was always kind of a low-key affair," said Tony Dale, vice president of marketing at Lion Brothers, the Owings Mills, Md., company that produced the items. He said it was low-key because MLB was not crazy about the idea that licensed patches could wind up on the seats of jeans and other objectionable places.
SPORTS
November 12, 1997 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Matthew Kilrain filled out the contest coupon for a chance to play football with NFL Pro Bowlers Emmitt Smith and Curtis Martin, dropped it in the entry box, and then forgot all about it. "I never thought I would win," 12-year-old Matthew recalled. But yesterday, three months after entering the contest, there he was, on a football field at Our Lady of Calvary School in Northeast Philadelphia with 19 of his friends and a couple of cousins, going over plays with the Dallas Cowboys' star running back.
SPORTS
December 8, 1996 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When, on Jan. 26, 1960, 33-year-old Pete Rozelle accepted the job of NFL commissioner in the men's room of Miami Beach's Kenilworth Hotel, the organization that he would convert into sports' limousine league was a clattering Model T. NFL headquarters was a tiny office in Bala Cynwyd, convenient to the home of Rozelle's recently deceased predecessor, Bert Bell, but inaccessible to almost everyone else. The staff consisted of four elderly men and an 80-year-old Kelly Girl temporary helper.
SPORTS
September 2, 1996 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man primarily responsible for bringing pro football back to this city of long-suffering pigskinophiles arrived for the inaugural Baltimore Ravens game yesterday at Memorial Stadium without benefit of escort or entourage. William Donald Schaefer, private citizen, once the most famous mayor in America, former two-term governor of Maryland, stepped out of his car before the redbrick overhang over the old north Baltimore stadium's front porch. At least the forgotten man still pulls a first-class parking space.
SPORTS
November 7, 1995 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones filed a $750 million suit against the NFL in federal court in New York yesterday, accusing the league of blocking teams from conducting their own marketing. The suit asked the court, under federal antitrust laws, to dismantle what it called "the unlawful cartel" used by the NFL in marketing its trademarks and logos. In September, the league and NFL Properties sued Jones and the Cowboys for $300 million over his recent private marketing deals with Nike, Pepsi and American Express.
SPORTS
October 27, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles already lead the NFL in rushing and defense. If the league ever decided to disclose such information, they'd almost certainly be No. 1 in another category - illegal clothing. Ray Rhodes said yesterday that cornerback Mark McMillian had been fined $5,000 by the league for writing on the tape he wrapped around his cleats in the win over the Giants on Oct. 15. "McMillian stormed into my office today and said, 'What did you fine me $5,000 for?' "I said, 'Man, I don't think I have that type of fine in my book,' " Rhodes said.
SPORTS
October 6, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Dallas Cowboys owners Jerry Jones has done it again, defying the NFL by making a deal with American Express, although Visa is the league's official credit card. American Express will become the official credit card of Texas Stadium, home of the Dallas Cowboys. Financial terms of the multiyear agreement, which has been rumored for weeks, were not released. The NFL said this latest move by Jones "does not change the fact that Visa is the official credit card of the National Football League and its 30 clubs.
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