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Nickel Mines

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NEWS
October 2, 2011
L. Gregory Jones is professor of theology at Duke Divinity School, author of Embodying Forgiveness, and coauthor of Forgiving as We've Been Forgiven Five years ago, Charles Carl Roberts IV entered an Amish school in Nickel Mines, Pa., and shot 10 girls - mortally wounding five - before killing himself. This quiet, rural community in Lancaster County suddenly became a place of unprecedented contrasts - violence amid peaceful people, hordes of satellite trucks in a place that favors simplicity.
NEWS
May 16, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Weeks after a milk-truck driver opened fire in an Amish school, a state police commander sought an unconventional way to both evoke and transcend the tragedy: a piece of art. The resulting watercolor, Remembering Nickel Mines, will be hung today at Troop J headquarters in Lancaster after a private ceremony. It took more than a year for the artist to render the painting. First he had to overcome his own emotional misgiving, for this artist was also a state trooper - one of the first to arrive at the shooting scene on that October day in 2006.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Acid corrodes the container that holds it. That's what happens when we hold on to bitterness. - Amish farmer from Nickel Mines, Pa. BART TOWNSHIP, Pa. - Christ King leans back hard against the weight of his daughter's wheelchair, lowers her with gentle thumps down the porch steps, and pushes her across the garden into the shade of a maple tree where a stranger waits. "Hello, Rosanna!" the stranger says cheerily. He is Richard Egan, a 72-year-old retired fund-raiser from Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 2, 2007 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The time has come round again. Tasseled stalks of corn stand tall and sere in unseasonable heat. In undulating fields, farmers behind horse-drawn plows turn under the remains of the harvest. Handmade signs advertise pumpkins and fresh cider. In Lancaster County, the pageant of the seasons proceeds; nature keeps its rhythms. In the play yard of the freshly built New Hope Amish School, boys in suspenders and girls in bonnets play softball. Younger children frolic, blond hair flashing in the sun. This time last year, many of those children were learning their lessons in a different one-room schoolhouse.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his role as a chaplain for the state police and, decades ago, the U.S. Army, the Rev. Grover DeVault held dying Marines in his arms and comforted distraught troopers in the hours after violent shootouts. But even those experiences could not prepare him for the scene six years ago in the one-room schoolhouse in Lancaster County: the bodies of five Amish girls in long-skirted dresses and the gunman lying on the floor of the Nickel Mines school. "There was nothing unique about seeing the carnage," said DeVault, "but he had brought in 2-by-4s, eyebolts, and ties.
NEWS
October 4, 2006 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it mattered most, the very things that set the Amish apart and made them feel safe - their shunning of most modern conveniences, their isolation, their trust and faith - aided their children's killer. Charles Carl Roberts IV entered a one-room schoolhouse that had no security system. With no cell phone, the teacher had to run to a nearby home to summon help. It took police almost 10 minutes to arrive, and before he could be stopped, Roberts had shot 10 girls - five of whom have died - and killed himself.
NEWS
October 7, 2006 | By Keith Herbert and Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Even as a somber procession of horse-drawn buggies with a small casket made its way to Bart Amish Cemetery yesterday in an achingly familiar scene, the community found an unexpected ray of hope. One of the victims of the Monday rampage at West Nickel Mines Amish School who was taken off life support and brought home to die in the last two days continued to breathe on her own, according to Daniel Esh, 57, an Amish artist and great-uncle to three boys who were inside the school. The 6-year-old girl, whom he identified as Rosanna King, was returned to Penn State's Hershey Medical Center for further treatment, Esh said yesterday.
NEWS
October 13, 2006 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
AFTER THE tragedy in the Amish schoolhouse last week, many observers put their reasoning on automatic pilot and came up with a one-size-fits-all response to the carnage - guns were at fault. No surprise there. Ignoring the fact that stricter gun-control laws would not have prevented Charles Roberts from obtaining the weapons he used to massacre the innocents in Nickel Mines, editorialists and activists of all stripes portrayed the young victims as sacrificial lambs of the National Rifle Association.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
AN ODD QUIRK of scheduling this week brought the openings of two plays that, while sharing a common trait, are at polar ends of the theatrical spectrum. Both "The Amish Project," which runs through Feb. 3 at Studio 5 inside the Walnut Street Theatre, and "Catch Me If You Can," here through Sunday at the Academy of Music, are based on actual events. But it's hard to imagine two more dissimilar offerings.   'Project's' new relevance We're sure playwright Jessica Dickey would have preferred that her 2009 piece, "The Amish Project," did not have such of-the-moment resonance for theatergoers.
NEWS
October 11, 2006 | By Larry King, Emilie Lounsberry and Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Barricaded in an Amish schoolhouse with 10 girls as hostages, gunman Charles Roberts IV warned an emergency dispatcher by phone that he would kill in "two seconds" if police did not leave the grounds. "Right now or they're dead, in two seconds," Roberts said, according to a 911 transcript released yesterday. The call came at 10:55 a.m., shortly before the milk-truck driver, 32, began firing inside the one-room school on Oct. 2. Five girls were killed and five were badly injured before Roberts fatally shot himself.
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NEWS
January 18, 2013
AN ODD QUIRK of scheduling this week brought the openings of two plays that, while sharing a common trait, are at polar ends of the theatrical spectrum. Both "The Amish Project," which runs through Feb. 3 at Studio 5 inside the Walnut Street Theatre, and "Catch Me If You Can," here through Sunday at the Academy of Music, are based on actual events. But it's hard to imagine two more dissimilar offerings.   'Project's' new relevance We're sure playwright Jessica Dickey would have preferred that her 2009 piece, "The Amish Project," did not have such of-the-moment resonance for theatergoers.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his role as a chaplain for the state police and, decades ago, the U.S. Army, the Rev. Grover DeVault held dying Marines in his arms and comforted distraught troopers in the hours after violent shootouts. But even those experiences could not prepare him for the scene six years ago in the one-room schoolhouse in Lancaster County: the bodies of five Amish girls in long-skirted dresses and the gunman lying on the floor of the Nickel Mines school. "There was nothing unique about seeing the carnage," said DeVault, "but he had brought in 2-by-4s, eyebolts, and ties.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | Associated Press
NICKEL MINES, Pa. - Members of an Amish community where a gunman killed five girls in a one-room schoolhouse in 2006 are writing letters to reach out in sympathy to grieving parents in Newtown, Conn. A farm services business owner who is not Amish has promised to drive the letters to Connecticut. He said Tuesday that he raised the idea over the weekend with the father of the woman who was teaching the day the massacre occurred at West Nickel Mines Amish School. Jerry Feister of Honey Brook said, "It just seems there's a connection or bond there.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
LET'S STOP shaking our heads in disbelief. Let's stop wondering how the methodical slaughter of children - babies - in Newtown, Conn., could possibly happen. Let's instead take a long hard look in the mirror and realize we had a role in this: All of us who watched tragedies unfold in a Colorado movie theater, an Amish school, a Texas military base. We grieved, but failed to demand politics and policies that might have helped end the slaughter. And please, TV reporters, stop calling Connecticut "idyllic.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Tony Norman
"I'm not really the heroic type. I was beat up by Quakers. " - Woody Allen as Miles Monroe in "Sleeper" Quakers aren't part of the American Anabaptist tradition. Other than a shared predisposition toward nonviolence, they have nothing in common with the Amish. Still, Allen's quip helps us think realistically about groups with reputations for fierce peacefulness. Recently, seven members of a breakaway sect were arrested in Ohio for chopping off the beards of their fellow Amish for refusing to tolerate their bad behavior.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Acid corrodes the container that holds it. That's what happens when we hold on to bitterness. - Amish farmer from Nickel Mines, Pa. BART TOWNSHIP, Pa. - Christ King leans back hard against the weight of his daughter's wheelchair, lowers her with gentle thumps down the porch steps, and pushes her across the garden into the shade of a maple tree where a stranger waits. "Hello, Rosanna!" the stranger says cheerily. He is Richard Egan, a 72-year-old retired fund-raiser from Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 2, 2011
L. Gregory Jones is professor of theology at Duke Divinity School, author of Embodying Forgiveness, and coauthor of Forgiving as We've Been Forgiven Five years ago, Charles Carl Roberts IV entered an Amish school in Nickel Mines, Pa., and shot 10 girls - mortally wounding five - before killing himself. This quiet, rural community in Lancaster County suddenly became a place of unprecedented contrasts - violence amid peaceful people, hordes of satellite trucks in a place that favors simplicity.
NEWS
May 16, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Weeks after a milk-truck driver opened fire in an Amish school, a state police commander sought an unconventional way to both evoke and transcend the tragedy: a piece of art. The resulting watercolor, Remembering Nickel Mines, will be hung today at Troop J headquarters in Lancaster after a private ceremony. It took more than a year for the artist to render the painting. First he had to overcome his own emotional misgiving, for this artist was also a state trooper - one of the first to arrive at the shooting scene on that October day in 2006.
NEWS
April 24, 2008 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
As the casket bearing the body of William J. "Stretch" Smaltz was lowered into the earth yesterday, the minister's wife saluted a larger-than-life character. "Wow! What a ride," exclaimed Linda Grill, and applause arose from the sea of mourners crowded into the church cemetery near Skippack. The burial service punctuated a daylong, 40-mile tribute to the 68-year-old Smaltz, a well-known figure in motorcycling circles. From 1993 until his death last week from cancer, the Honey Brook resident and his wife, Karen, ran a popular Harley-Davidson dealership in Eagle, Chester County.
NEWS
November 14, 2007 | CAROL TOWARNICKY
'IT WAS our Sept. 11. " That's what one Amish man called the schoolhouse shooting in Amish country last year in which a local man shot and killed five Amish girls and wounded five others (one remains severely disabled) before killing himself. The arrival of police apparently prevented him from carrying out his plan to sexually assault them. The day after our Sept. 11, in 2001, this newspaper's front page reflected at least a portion of the national mood for revenge. The headline screamed "Blood for Blood.
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