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Nicotine

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NEWS
April 16, 1997 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, scientists studying the brain have quarreled over whether smoking protects people from such diseases as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. After all, the theory went, nicotine stimulates the brain, so it should help fight off brain diseases. A study from the Netherlands yesterday cast doubt on that theory, finding that smokers in fact suffered higher rates of Alzheimer's disease than nonsmokers. The results will cheer antismoking activists who have feared that research into the "benefits" of smoking would reduce smokers' efforts to quit.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Frustrated smokers ate mints and licked lollipops yesterday on the first day of a smoking ban on U.S. airline flights of two hours or less, and many lighted cigarettes the minute they left their planes. A dozen puffers protested at Washington's National Airport, but airline employees at Philadelphia International Airport and Newark International Airport said the new policy seemed to be accepted by most passengers. Agnes Dean of Philadelphia, a smoker arriving home after a trip to Florida, said the change "didn't bother me. It's just as well for safety's sake.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By Barbara Beck And Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writers
This is it. Throw away the cigarettes. Bury the ashtrays. Take a long, deep breath. With the declaration by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop Monday that nicotine in tobacco products is an addictive drug comparable to heroin, there may be no better time for smokers to quit. Koop's 618-page report cited 171 separate studies as proof that nicotine hooks smokers, and says the drug has psychoactive and mood-altering effects on the brain. That means there are close to 50 million tobacco addicts in the country, according to the Centers for Disease Control's Office on Smoking and Health.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | BY CAL THOMAS
The federal government has issued a ban on smoking except in designated areas in all 7,500 federal buildings. The nearly total prohibition on smoking in the federal workplace, effective Feb. 8, has been a long time coming, and ought to be extended by Congress to every enclosed public area. Non-smokers should be freed from inhaling the acrid smoke of nicotine addicts, who may have the right to kill themselves and smell bad, but who have no right to do it unto others. Other than a dead skunk, there is nothing that smells worse or offends more than a cigarette smoker puffing (and usually coughing)
NEWS
August 22, 1996 | By Shankar Vedantam and Bob Geiger, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Clinton administration is soon expected to declare nicotine an addictive drug and announce restrictions intended to keep teenagers from smoking. The attempt to restrict tobacco companies' appeals to teenagers and cut youngsters' access to cigarettes may come as early as tomorrow. That would cap a flurry of presidential activity signing popular legislation just days before the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The long-expected move would give explicit authority to the Food and Drug Administration to regulate tobacco sales and advertising to minors.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | By John Monk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A major U.S. tobacco company secretly used a genetically engineered plant with double the amount of nicotine found in nature to make cigarettes, the head of the Food and Drug Administration charged yesterday. The souped-up cigarettes - Viceroy King Size, Viceroy Lights King Size, Richland King Size, Richland Lights King Size and Raleigh Lights King Size - were distributed nationally by Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co. in 1993 and early 1994, FDA Commissioner David Kessler told a congressional panel.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A panel of scientists agreed yesterday that nicotine in cigarettes is an addictive drug, much like heroin and cocaine, an important first step toward the possible regulation of cigarettes by the federal government. The Food and Cosmetic Act gives the Food and Drug Administration the authority to regulate drugs that are intended to affect the structure and function of the body. The nine-member Drug Abuse Advisory Committee to the FDA voted overwhelmingly yesterday that nicotine is the active agent in tobacco that causes people to become hooked.
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | By Bob Geiger, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Philip Morris, the tobacco giant that says it does not manipulate nicotine in its cigarettes, once tried to find a substitute chemical that could mimic nicotine's druglike effects and keep smokers coming back for more. Victor DeNoble, who worked on the research project for the company, told a House subcommittee yesterday that the project's ultimate goal was to take the nicotine out of the tobacco and replace it with a substitute that would not have harmful side-effects. Yesterday's hearing before the Energy and Commerce subcommittee on health and the environment also focused on Philip Morris' cloak-and-dagger efforts to keep the details of the research secret - from bringing research animals into the lab at night to threatening lawsuits if research findings were published.
LIVING
April 8, 1996 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Some time in the course of evolution, a combination of 26 atoms was given the power to unlock a few of life's deepest chemical secrets. Secrets of pleasure. Secrets of death. Ten of the atoms were carbons, 14 were hydrogens, two nitrogens. Arranged in a particular pattern, they triggered powerful physical and psychological reactions in species as diverse as cockroaches and humans. The combination of atoms is called nicotine. It is one of the most unusual psychoactive drugs known.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Will tougher cigarette warnings work? The Liggett Group's agreement to mark its packages with a warning that cigarettes are addictive comes after 30 years of increasingly somber cautions about the danger of tobacco. During that time, cigarette smoking has dropped by half among adult males and by one-third among adult women. But it is increasing sharply among teenagers, when the habit is usually picked up. In fact, teenage smoking increased by 30 percent from 1991 to 1995, according to a study published yesterday by the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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NEWS
September 30, 2014
THERE WAS celebration locally last week when Gov. Corbett signed the bill allowing Philadelphia to increase the tax on cigarettes by $2 a pack. Mayor Nutter praised the governor and the Legislature for finally taking action. Schools Superintendent William Hite added his thanks. No one did high-fives, but there was a sense of satisfaction over a mission accomplished. The situation reminds us of the title of the 1960s novel Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me . The cigarette tax - which will raise the price of a pack by 30 percent - will provide a source of continuing revenue for the financially battered school district.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Lisa Tom, For The Inquirer
Fred Contino has been smoking since he was 13. He is, at 53, trying to quit. He has replaced his Marlboro Reds with a small, white plastic tube - his new prescription nicotine inhaler. "It's going to take time," he says. "When I want a cigarette, I try and take puffs on it. That takes away the craving for a little bit, but the cravings are still there. " Contino is one of about 44 million cigarette smokers in the United States, 19 percent of all adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 20 years of cigarettes, things started adding up for Abhi Nath: The smoke burn. Future health concerns. "The whole ick factor. " Then his employer added a $50 health insurance surcharge. "And I was dating a girl and she hated cigarettes. So I started e-cigarettes. " Three months on, Nath, 38, of Old City, gets looks of curiosity, not disgust. He feels and smells better. He plans to gradually reduce the nicotine level (there's no tar or ash) - and to enjoy doing it. "The only thing about e-cigarettes is there is no regulation of the content.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2013 | By Michael Felberbaum, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - The Food and Drug Administration says smokers who are trying to quit can safely use over-the-counter nicotine gum, patches, and lozenges for longer than previously recommended, in a move to help millions of Americans kick the habit. Current labels suggest that consumers stop smoking or using other products containing nicotine when they begin using the products to help them quit, and that they should stop using nicotine replacement products after 12 weeks at most. The federal agency said Monday that the makers of gum and other nicotine replacement products can change the labels that say one should not smoke when using the products.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
Debi Austin, 62, who smoked a cigarette through a hole in her throat to illustrate her struggle with nicotine addiction in a California public service advertisement has died of cancer, health officials and her family said Wednesday. Ms. Austin first appeared on television in 1996, telling viewers she began smoking at age 13 and could never quit. In a quiet, halting rasp, she told the camera, "They say nicotine isn't addictive," before inhaling from a lit cigarette held to a hole in her throat.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Chronic constipation, heart disease and death Q: I had always believed that Elvis Presley died at 42 from a heart attack. However, I've recently read that his longtime physician George Nichopoulos believes Elvis died from chronic constipation. How does someone die from that? A: According to the autopsy report, hypertensive cardiovascular disease and a "colon problem" were the likely contributing factors to his premature death from a heart attack. It has been reported by his now-retired personal physician that Elvis suffered for years from chronic constipation and that his colon was markedly distended at autopsy.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
Maybe it was just a bad nicotine fit * Bustleton Avenue near Hellerman Street An armed robber made off with cash and cigarettes after holding up a Wawa in Oxford Circle yesterday, police said. The suspect, described as a Hispanic male in his early 30s, was wearing a tan jacket and tan pants when he entered the Wawa about 6:30 a.m. yesterday and pulled out a gun. He fled on foot along Bustleton Avenue with an undetermined amount of cash and about 30 packs of cigarettes, police said.
NEWS
December 27, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soon after the quit-smoking pill Chantix debuted in 2006, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began receiving reports of severe psychiatric disturbances in people taking it. Experts who analyzed the FDA's database of "serious adverse events" found Chantix was suspected in more cases of violence than any other prescription drug. It also generated more reports of suicide, self-injury, and depression than any other smoking-cessation therapy. Despite this troubling link - which has led the FDA to require prominent warnings on the Chantix package insert - researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and other medical centers are now testing it in people who may be especially vulnerable to such problems.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
The Philadelphia Department of Public Health hasn't quite developed a reputation for merrymaking, but for the second year in a row it has come up with presents - a one-month supply of nicotine patches plus telephone counseling - for 5,000 people. The free smoking- cessation packages are worth about $400 each (paid for with a federal grant). Health Commissioner Donald F. Schwarz said a survey after last year's giveaway found that it had helped 1,700 residents quit. Philadelphia has the highest adult smoking rate of the 10 biggest cities in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2011 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gregory Conley can't go inside his favorite Starbucks in Mount Laurel to take a few puffs, so he enjoys his habit outside. To passersby, it may look like he is drawing deeply from any old cigarette, but a closer whiff proves otherwise. That's because the newest smoking rage, boosted by "vapers" (that's with an e , not an o ), is not to smoke - sort of. Battery-powered "e-cigarettes" - no matches needed - give consumers a nicotine fix without the burning tobacco haze, hazards, and stench of their old-fashioned counterparts.
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