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August 3, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - The U.S. team had scored 100 points by the middle of the third quarter. It was that kind of night for the Americans. They broke a few records, shattered others. They hardly missed. Carmelo Anthony scored 37 points, making 10 of 12 three-pointers, and the Americans rewrote the Olympic record book with a scintillating shooting performance and 156-73 win over Nigeria Thursday night, an epic blowout that seemed to send a message to the rest of the men's tournament field.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | By Michael Clough and Nancy Bodurtha
The sanctions that ultimately hurt South Africa were those imposed by state and local governments, which forced U.S. companies to choose between doing business in South Africa or in California and New York. Indeed, one of the paradoxes of the South African case was that the decisions made by U.S. companies, in the 1960s and early '70s, to invest in South Africa, despite the appeals of the then-weak anti-apartheid movement to stay out, created the economic targets necessary to discipline Pretoria in the mid-'80s.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | By CHIDO NWANGU
Nigeria, a West African country of nearly 114 million people, with more than twice the land area of California, is a disaster waiting to happen. Many Nigerians are fed up with military dictatorship of Gen. Sani Abacha. Chief Moshood Abiola, who appeared to have won a democratic presidential election last year, was denied office by the military, is on trial for treason, and oil workers have walked off their jobs in protest. Kerosene and fuel prices have skyrocketed. Milk costs as much as one quarter of some workers' monthly wages.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Shehu Saulawa and Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
BAUCHI, Nigeria - Gunmen attacked a camp for a construction company in rural northern Nigeria, killing a guard and kidnapping seven foreign workers from Britain, Greece, Italy, Lebanon, and the Philippines, authorities said Sunday, in the biggest kidnapping yet in a region under attack by Islamic extremists. The attack Saturday night happened in Jama'are, a town in a rural portion of Bauchi state. There, the gunmen first attacked a local prison, burning two police trucks, Bauchi state police spokesman Hassan Muhammed told the Associated Press.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Adamu Adamu and Michelle Faul, Associated Press
POTISKUM, Nigeria - Islamic militants attacked a boarding school before dawn Saturday, dousing a dormitory in fuel and lighting it ablaze as students slept, survivors said. At least 30 people were killed in the deadliest attack yet on schools in Nigeria's embattled northeast. Authorities blamed the violence on Boko Haram, a radical group whose name means "Western education is sacrilege. " The militants have been behind a series of recent attacks on schools, including one in which gunmen opened fire on children taking exams.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
KADUNA, Nigeria - The suicide car bombing that killed at least 38 people in Nigeria claimed victims across its religious and ethnic lines, showing clearly that everyone is at risk in this nation often violently divided against itself. Young Muslim men of the Hausa Fulani people of Nigeria's north burned to death in Sunday's blast, pinned under the weight of their motorcycle taxis. A passer-by from Nigeria's southwestern Yoruba people found himself thrown to the road in the explosion.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Gunmen armed with assault rifles attacked a rural village Sunday in northern Nigeria, killing at least 24 people, including worshippers leaving a mosque after prayers before dawn, officials said. The attack happened in Dogon Dawa, a village deep in the pasturelands of Kaduna state where police and security forces maintain only a light presence. Police and soldiers also cut off access to the region Sunday, limiting the response of aid agencies. A rescue official who lives near the village told the Associated Press the attacks began in the early morning under the cover of darkness, with as many as 50 gunmen surrounding the village and its adjacent farmlands.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Mohammed Abubakar, Associated Press
POTISKUM, Nigeria - Assailants in northeastern Nigeria killed three North Korean doctors, beheading one of the physicians, in the latest attack on health workers in a nation under assault by a radical Islamic sect, officials said Sunday. The deaths Saturday night of the doctors in Potiskum, a town in Yobe state long under attack by the sect known as Boko Haram, comes after gunmen killed at least nine women administering polio vaccines in Kano, the major city of Nigeria's predominantly Muslim north.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A clash with police in which at least 19 students died at Nigeria's largest university has resulted in student protests nationwide and caused nine of the country's 15 campuses to close, radio stations have reported. The violence began Friday on the campus of Ahmadu Bello University in Zaria, about 45 miles from the northern city of Kaduna. The university, which has 17,000 students, was closed indefinitely. The protests stemmed from the suspension of two student leaders after a demonstration last month to commemorate bloody student riots in 1978.
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June 19, 2015 | BY JONATHAN TANNENWALD, Philly.com jtannenwald@phillynews.com
EDMONTON - It's as true in soccer as it is in every other sport that defense wins championships. So far at the Women's World Cup, the United States' back line has delivered a string of excellent performances. In three group-stage games, the unit allowed just one goal, and it came in the 27th minute of the opening game against Australia. Since then, the American net has not been breached. Even though the attack has struggled, back-to-back shutouts of Sweden and Nigeria have helped provide momentum heading into Monday's round-of-16 game against Colombia (8 p.m., Fox Sports 1 and NBC Universo)
SPORTS
May 1, 2015
OBI ROMEO, a 6-10 forward who played sparingly as a freshman last season, will transfer from Saint Joseph's. He played in just four games for the 13-18 Hawks, averaging 6.5 minutes. Romeo, who came to this country from Nigeria in 2011, was recruited from Greenbrier East High School in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., where he averaged 13 points, 14 rebounds and 4.5 blocks as a senior. "You can't find a better human being, better teammate or harder-working student than Obi," said St. Joe's coach Phil Martelli.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WOULD NOT have been surprising to find Dr. Milton A. Wohl, a distinguished physician, repairing a tractor on his farm in Schwenksville, putting in a crop of corn, cutting down a tree or working a piece of wood in his shop. Dr. Wohl was a prominent orthopedic surgeon, former president of the Philadelphia County Medical Society, and a highly regarded teacher. But he was also a farmer, a handyman who could take anything mechanical apart and fix it, a historian, music lover, fisherman and world traveler.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal Customs and Border Protection officers came across a rare counterfeit-money scam when they caught a man from Cameroon bringing $17,000 in bogus currency into Philadelphia International Airport recently. The officers discovered three packs of "black notes," bound similarly to checkbooks, during a routine baggage examination July 16, an official said Thursday. The notes appeared to be blank sheets of white paper, but under ultraviolet light, officers detected faint images resembling U.S. currency, officials said.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Lutz, 92, of Mount Laurel, an educator in the Philadelphia area and abroad, died Sunday, June 29, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of a subdural hematoma. Dr. Lutz taught in Philadelphia public schools, then joined the Plymouth Whitemarsh School District as principal of three elementary schools. When Plymouth Whitemarsh expanded to become the Colonial School District, he was named assistant superintendent for curriculum. As the Philadelphia suburbs grew, he oversaw the design and construction of new schools, and for 10 years, recruited and hired teachers.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nil-nil was the final score of the World Cup exhibition game played Tuesday by the national soccer teams of Greece and Nigeria at PPL Park in Chester. A no-goals tie hardly inspires. But for many green-clad Nigerians in the stands, it was a victory even before the kickoff, when Nigeria's players came out escorted by children with cards emblazoned with "#Bring Back Our Girls. Stand Against Terrorism. " It was a message about the 238 girls kidnapped in April and still missing after Boko Haram militants attacked their school in northern Nigeria.
SPORTS
June 5, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vincent Enyeama batted Greek forward Georgios Samaras' shot from the left side of the box into the air. The rebound went straight to forward Dimitris Salpingidis, who attempted a header in the 83d minute of the pre-World Cup friendly between Nigeria and Greece at PPL Park. This time, Enyeama, the Nigerian goalkeeper, leaped and caught the attempt, preserving a scoreless game. Defense and goalkeeping controlled the game in a 0-0 draw played in front of a largely pro-Greece crowd of 10,131 fans at the Chester stadium.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
If it hadn't been for their determined mothers - and for Twitter - the plight of nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram would have remained hidden. For nearly three weeks, the Nigerian government showed no concern for these high school students snatched from their dorm by a radical Islamist group whose name means "Western education is sinful. " As the limos rolled in for a glitzy version of the Davos World Economic Forum in the Nigerian capital, Abuja, officials showed no interest in the 276 girls still missing.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michelle Faul, Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria - Shaking a finger while cradling an assault rifle, the leader of Nigeria's extremist Islamic sect threatened to burn down more schools and kill teachers. But he denied that his fighters were killing children. In a new video released Saturday, Islamic radical Abubakar Shekau said he "fully supports" attacks on several schools in recent weeks. The U.N. Children's Fund says at least 48 students and seven teachers have been killed since June, with some burned alive this month in a dormitory.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
WHEN PATRONS walk into Wazobia, a West African restaurant specializing in the comfort foods of Nigeria, many greet the owner in the Yoruba language. "This is my countryman," owner Risikat Bola Jamiu, who usually goes by Bola, says of a man from the Ibo tribe. Jamiu is Yoruba but welcomes all three of Nigeria's major ethnic groups. Even her North Philadelphia restaurant's name is a combination of the words for "come in" from the three languages: wa in Yoruba, zo in Hausa, bia in Ibo. "We are all blended together as one Nigeria," Jamiu said Friday.
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