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Night Kitchen

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the poise and the polish of a major world leader, Maurice Sendak was wittily fending off the news media's queries about the Wild Things that inhabit his fantasies and his fiction. Sure, his award-winning picture books are populated by monsters. But they don't frighten Sendak. "I'm so easily scared, if I saw my work as scary, I couldn't go through with it," Sendak said recently. On the other hand, he reminded his interrogators, "children take a great pleasure in being scared.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
With the trailers suddenly running everywhere for the new, live-action adaptation of Maurice Sendak's durable children's classic Where the Wild Things Are , it seemed a fine moment to drop in at the Rosenbach Museum. The Rosenbach, whose library and exhibits occupy two stately townhouses on Delancey Place at 20th Street, is home to the world's largest collection of "Sendakia," as it calls it, a trove of 10,000 sketches and original drafts and watercolors that made it into his books; or, more intriguingly in some cases, did not. What drew our attention particularly was an intimate exhibition that opened last week called "Too Many Thoughts to Chew: A Sendak Stew," a visual feast of the perils (and adventures)
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
What is there left to discover about Maurice Sendak after acknowledging that he is one of the most popular of contemporary author-illustrators, and has his own brand of fantasy - something widely recognized since the 1960s? The short answer is that there's plenty left to discover. And that's because this exceptionally gifted New York artist never has stood still. He keeps deepening his insights and introducing levels of meaning as he develops his talents. Sendak's initial major milestone was his boisterous first full-length picture book and children's classic, Where the Wild Things Are (1963)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1988 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
There will always be spoilsports who insist that certain things are for kids and kids alone. Ignore them. Then pick up a copy of Tammy Grimes reading Where the Wild Things Are and other stories by Maurice Sendak (45 minutes, Caedmon, $9.95). Even if you've seen Sendak's books, you may not have noticed how good the prose is, because his illustrations are so captivating. He reminds us what it's like to be a child who, however sweet, is also sometimes crabby, sometimes bored, sometimes naughty - and always imaginative.
NEWS
April 27, 1995 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
Early in World War II, an impressionable boy from Brooklyn - one Maurice Sendak - found himself trying to cope with a world gone mad. "Life stood on its head," he said the other day in a phone chat from his home in Connecticut. Sendak began to portray this topsy-turvy world on sketch pads. The pursuit ultimately led to now-celebrated stories such as "In the Night Kitchen" and "Where the Wild Things Are. " Visitors to two Philadelphia attractions, the Please Touch Museum and the Rosenbach Museum, soon will be able to enjoy Sendak's unique artistic vision in exhibitions drawn from his classic children's books.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Amy B. Jordan is director of the Media and the Developing Child Sector at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Cen
I was moved to tears Tuesday when a colleague phoned to say that Maurice Sendak, the celebrated children's book author and illustrator, had died. Sendak's books have been an important presence in my life for almost as long as I can remember. My very first childhood book-related memory is of my brother's copy of Sendak's most famous book, Where the Wild Things Are, which won the Caldecott Medal in 1964. When my own children came into the world, this is a book I read to them over and over again, partly out of nostalgia but mostly out of a recognition that Sendak's stories and pictures serve to validate the unique and complicated perspective that children have of the world around them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
The 2010 Sendak in Spring Festival, honoring the work of children's author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, will be celebrated on Saturday and Sunday at the Rosenbach Museum and Library. Workshops from noon to 4 p.m. each day will explore the art of storytelling, illustration, spoken word, and bookmaking, taught by Philadelphia storyteller Linda Goss and book artist Jude Robison. From 1 to 3, Wild Things Whirligig, created by Karen Saillant, artistic director of the International Opera Theater, will be performed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1987 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Children bestow their most passionate affections on their homeliest dolls. Adults may wonder why the heroine of The Nutcracker should choose to love the clumsy Nutcracker doll above all others, but kids understand why instinctively. As the least attractive of the lot, the Nutcracker doll is the most difficult to love - and thus the most enticing. He is a test of the heroine's capacity to love. In Maurice Sendak's designs for the ballet The Nutcracker, which are on display at the Rosenbach Museum and Library through Jan. 10, the famous children's illustrator ups the ante for the test.
NEWS
November 24, 1987 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
Having conquered the world of children's books, Maurice Sendak is on his way to making the stage his own as well. The proof is on display at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, where 45 drawings from Sendak's stage production of "The Nutcracker" will be on display today through Jan. 10. Additional drawings Sendak created for an illustrated book based on "The Nutcracker" are also shown. Although his diminutive frame and gray-speckled beard do not suggest trailblazing heroism, Sendak, at age 59, has quietly revolutionized the world of children's books and has made his mark in the field of set design for opera, theater and dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 30-plus years, Maurice Sendak has been creating social commentaries and worlds of wonder. In Sendak stories, animals inhabit a little boy's bedroom, a small boy bakes enough cake to feed the world, an unlikely pair raise a homeless child, and a girl saves her sister from goblins. You probably will find a Sendak book in your child's bedroom, unless yours is as big a slob as mine are. They're there somewhere: Where the Wild Things Are, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, and the fairly new We Are All in the Dumps With Jack and Guy. These are definitely not the Berenstain Bears.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Amy B. Jordan is director of the Media and the Developing Child Sector at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Cen
I was moved to tears Tuesday when a colleague phoned to say that Maurice Sendak, the celebrated children's book author and illustrator, had died. Sendak's books have been an important presence in my life for almost as long as I can remember. My very first childhood book-related memory is of my brother's copy of Sendak's most famous book, Where the Wild Things Are, which won the Caldecott Medal in 1964. When my own children came into the world, this is a book I read to them over and over again, partly out of nostalgia but mostly out of a recognition that Sendak's stories and pictures serve to validate the unique and complicated perspective that children have of the world around them.
FOOD
January 20, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, the Night Kitchen Bakery made do with a cramped kitchen in which to turn out raspberry crumb tarts, pecan pies, double fudge brownies, lemon curd, hazelnut buttercream, three-tiered wedding cakes, and a personal favorite, snails. At a single small table by the front door, engaged couples could leaf through photos of wedding-cake options, but other customers had to pretty much get what they wanted and go because there was no other seating. Amy Beth Edelman, who bought the bakery in 2000, often looked with longing at the consignment shop next door (later, a hair salon)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
The 2010 Sendak in Spring Festival, honoring the work of children's author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, will be celebrated on Saturday and Sunday at the Rosenbach Museum and Library. Workshops from noon to 4 p.m. each day will explore the art of storytelling, illustration, spoken word, and bookmaking, taught by Philadelphia storyteller Linda Goss and book artist Jude Robison. From 1 to 3, Wild Things Whirligig, created by Karen Saillant, artistic director of the International Opera Theater, will be performed.
NEWS
October 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Spike Jonze was a little kid - back when he was little Adam Spiegel of Bethesda, Md. - he latched on to Where the Wild Things Are, the story of misbehaving Max, sent to bed without his supper, tumbling into a land inhabited by horned, clawed, anarchic monsters. And Max, in his wolf's pajamas, becomes king of the Wild Things. "I would look at those pictures - where Max's bedroom turns into a forest - and there was something that felt like magic there," Jonze says about the treasured Maurice Sendak title, a 37-page, 338-word picture book first published in 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
With the trailers suddenly running everywhere for the new, live-action adaptation of Maurice Sendak's durable children's classic Where the Wild Things Are , it seemed a fine moment to drop in at the Rosenbach Museum. The Rosenbach, whose library and exhibits occupy two stately townhouses on Delancey Place at 20th Street, is home to the world's largest collection of "Sendakia," as it calls it, a trove of 10,000 sketches and original drafts and watercolors that made it into his books; or, more intriguingly in some cases, did not. What drew our attention particularly was an intimate exhibition that opened last week called "Too Many Thoughts to Chew: A Sendak Stew," a visual feast of the perils (and adventures)
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
What is there left to discover about Maurice Sendak after acknowledging that he is one of the most popular of contemporary author-illustrators, and has his own brand of fantasy - something widely recognized since the 1960s? The short answer is that there's plenty left to discover. And that's because this exceptionally gifted New York artist never has stood still. He keeps deepening his insights and introducing levels of meaning as he develops his talents. Sendak's initial major milestone was his boisterous first full-length picture book and children's classic, Where the Wild Things Are (1963)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the poise and the polish of a major world leader, Maurice Sendak was wittily fending off the news media's queries about the Wild Things that inhabit his fantasies and his fiction. Sure, his award-winning picture books are populated by monsters. But they don't frighten Sendak. "I'm so easily scared, if I saw my work as scary, I couldn't go through with it," Sendak said recently. On the other hand, he reminded his interrogators, "children take a great pleasure in being scared.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 30-plus years, Maurice Sendak has been creating social commentaries and worlds of wonder. In Sendak stories, animals inhabit a little boy's bedroom, a small boy bakes enough cake to feed the world, an unlikely pair raise a homeless child, and a girl saves her sister from goblins. You probably will find a Sendak book in your child's bedroom, unless yours is as big a slob as mine are. They're there somewhere: Where the Wild Things Are, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, and the fairly new We Are All in the Dumps With Jack and Guy. These are definitely not the Berenstain Bears.
NEWS
April 27, 1995 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
Early in World War II, an impressionable boy from Brooklyn - one Maurice Sendak - found himself trying to cope with a world gone mad. "Life stood on its head," he said the other day in a phone chat from his home in Connecticut. Sendak began to portray this topsy-turvy world on sketch pads. The pursuit ultimately led to now-celebrated stories such as "In the Night Kitchen" and "Where the Wild Things Are. " Visitors to two Philadelphia attractions, the Please Touch Museum and the Rosenbach Museum, soon will be able to enjoy Sendak's unique artistic vision in exhibitions drawn from his classic children's books.
LIVING
April 19, 1995 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maurice Sendak, the author and illustrator of children's books, is a man who deals in images even more than in words. So it is fair to begin with an image: He is sitting in a straight-backed parlor chair in the Four Seasons Hotel in Philadelphia. His breakfast cereal is uneaten, his Evian bottle unopened, and he has a hand on each knee as if set for takeoff. The windows are behind him and he faces an expensive sofa and a Peaceable Kingdom-esque print that bears the biblical admonition: "A little child shall lead them.
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