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Night Music

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NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Bristol Riverside Theatre's posters and program for A Little Night Music advertise the fact that it contains "Send in the Clowns. " The song, which serves as a musical metaphor for the show's characters who are foolish in their pursuit of sex and love, may also be applied to the production itself. This light, colorful version of the Stephen Sondheim musical is strong on humor, which makes it easy and enjoyable to watch. But A Little Night Music also deals with the pain and joy of emotional attachment and sexual passion, and that part of it is not so strongly revealed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
The Bobs sing for everyone who has ever belted out a number or two in the shower. They're the Volkswagen Bug convertibles on a road filled with slick Porsches. The San Francisco a cappella quartet, which will perform outdoors at Penn's Landing tomorrow night, puts the emphasis on fun. Sure, these people are talented singers and their voices blend into extravagant, four-part harmonies at times, but their forte is making people smile. "I think anyone who has ever sung at any level before, even if it was with the radio while driving in the car, can find something they like about us," said Matthew "Bob" Stull, one of the Bobs, who took their name from the dog term, Best of Breed.
NEWS
December 11, 1986 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
In reviving a musical of such indelible memory as A Little Night Music, the trick is not to make us forget the original but to discover a fresh approach that does justice to the memory. The Walnut Street Theater Company has tried. Its production, which opened last night, bears evidence of rethinking. A new concept is tried for this beautifully conceptual show, but the effort has been made, plainly, by people who are not in the same league as the creative talents who made such magic with the 1973 Broadway production.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Pop aficionados get a belated look at (and listen to) a very cool show tonight as Channel 17 airs two episodes of "Night Music" back-to-back from 8 to 10 p.m. Then, capping the night, is a Channel 17-produced special at 10 p.m. devoted to Philadelphia music acts. Co-hosted by saxman David Sanborn and British rock keyboardist/raconteur Jools Holland, "Night Music" was known in its first season as "Sunday Night. " Many NBC stations carried it, but Channel 3 passed, to run a more profitable movie.
NEWS
September 6, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
A repeat of the film Taps and Part 2 of Spitting Image (both of which are full of familiar faces) are tonight's network highlights. Locally, the big news is the premiere of Buddy Ryan's football show. EVENING HIGHLIGHTS BUDDY RYAN: FOOTBALL (7 p.m., Ch. 10) - Why do I have this suspicion that Ryan's day-before-the-game TV show will be more lively and entertaining than the run-of-the-mill, film-of-the-run head-coach showcase? Ryan is a smart enough man to know how to stir up hornets by using the media, and this new 30- minute show is a perfect place for him to hold court.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
This week's opening of Cole Porter's musical Anything Goes marks the start of the fifth season of productions by Puttin' on the Ritz, a theater company housed in the Ritz Theater on the White Horse Pike in Oaklyn. "Overwhelming, surprising, satisfying (and) scary," was how Bruce Curless, managing director of Puttin' on the Ritz, described the prospect of the company's fifth year. "When I stop and think that this is our fifth season, it seems like yesterday we were renovating, getting ready for our first season," the Runnemede resident said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2001 | By TOM Di NARDO For the Daily News
?Wide appeal is the orchestra's aim during the PNC Concert Season at the Mann, and this week's two-night Broadway offering tests uncharted summer territory. Tonight Sergei Rachmaninoff called the Philadelphians "the world's greatest orchestra," and his rich Russian textures were perfectly suited to its lush, burnished sound. Oregon Symphony conductor James DePreist will return to his hometown, replacing?originally scheduled Czech batoner Zdenek Macal. Rachmaninoff's heartfelt "Piano Concerto No. 2," surely his most beloved work, will be played by Helene Grimaud, the exciting French pianist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1994 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER Sara Sherr, Sam Wood and Dan DeLuca also contributed
"Alot of people only really see the tip of the iceberg," Joe Jackson reports from his Manhattan apartment. "If you've had a couple of hits - which I've done more or less by accident - then that's all that a lot of people are going to be aware of, so that when I go and make an album of instrumental compositions, people sort of throw their hands up and holler and think I have gone completely mad. " But Jackson's fans have come to expect as much....
LIVING
October 3, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How does a composer such as Bela Bartok stand a chance in an age as decidedly anti-intellectual as ours? The answer: With a little help from his friends - such as pianist Jerome Lowenthal, who performed Sunday at Settlement Music School in Queen Village. Lowenthal gave a concert that was one part recital, one part graduate class - with a dash of Victor Borge. Today's music industry seems driven more by marketers than musicologists, and so composers whose music takes a little work on the part of the listener are scarce this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Flirtatious Frenchmen and fabulously flaky pastries - what more could a person want in a cafe? How about soups, sandwiches and cheese plates, too? Or a little night music? How about a night-owl-friendly schedule that keeps it open till midnight? Cheap Eats says "Je t'adore" to the Caribou Cafe on Walnut Street, a very pleasant, very French place to stop before or after a show at the Forrest Theater. Or any time, for that matter. Applause is in order because there are not nearly enough places for civilized after-theater coffee and dessert.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Winning a Pulitzer Prize guarantees nothing except high expectations for continued greatness and a durability that may or may not come to pass. When did you last hear Leslie Bassett's Variations for Orchestra , given the honor in 1966 after Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra took it for a spin at the Academy of Music? Friday night's world premiere at Curtis' Gould Hall of Cha by the saxophonists of the Prism Quartet arrived just as the confetti was settling around its composer, Julia Wolfe, who won this year's Pulitzer for Anthracite Fields . Did this knowledge alter the way we heard Cha ?
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Praise be to the Roots, the band that remade Philadelphia's Fourth of July free concert tradition on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. On a steamy Thursday night, at a stage set up on Eakins Oval and pointed toward City Hall, the Philadelphia and Late Night With Jimmy Fallon band served as the musical glue holding together an all-over-the-place bill that included soft-rock guitar hero John Mayer, hip-hop vocalist J. Cole, R&B smoothie Ne-Yo (the...
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The Arden Theatre first staged Stephen Sondheim's A Little Night Music in 1995 at the Arts Bank on Broad and South Streets. Two decades on, they've upstaged the musical with a gorgeously designed, magnificently presented production that, as a capstone to the Arden's 25th season, revels in its success. Hugh Wheeler's book (inspired by Ingmar Bergman's 1955 film Smiles of a Summer Night ) depicts the intermingled romantic follies of three couples: mid-40s lawyer Fredrik Egerman (Christopher Patrick Mullen)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Certain music never becomes easy. In fact, the formidability of Bela Bartok's six string quartets increases over time, especially when heard in the marathon concert by the Borromeo String Quartet Sunday at the Curtis Institute. Though not the first Bartok marathon in my experience, it was the most intense, performed at a high standard that brought you so deeply into the music's inner workings that you wondered if your brain could take it all in. Spanning the period from 1908 when the composer was 27 to the eve of World War II in 1939, Bartok's quartets ask to be performed in a single concert not just because they represent one of the highest peaks in 20th-century music, but because there's an easily traceable progression.
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Lots of listeners no doubt attend the Academy of Music's anniversary concerts because they love the old hall and because they love the Philadelphia Orchestra in it. In recent years, though, the gala concert has become less old-society-centric and more of an event whose tickets go in blocks to corporations sponsoring the event. Audiences may marvel at the Academy's elegance, as last night's white-tie and gowned crowd no doubt did at the 51st iteration of the event. But orchestral music?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2006 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's hip-hop and classical, it's dancers and drums, and it's all under one roof - and for one price. The Kimmel Center's Summer Solstice Celebration is back after a one-year hiatus and is bringing with it more acts (48) in more hours (19). Family-friendly performances by day gradually morph into an adults' night out - and night up, as a percussion ensemble beats in the sunrise on Sunday morning. "It's not just a kids' event - it's for everybody," says Mervon Mehta, the center's vice president of programming and education.
NEWS
February 6, 2006 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the workday is over in Camden, busy Market Street is quickly deserted. But tomorrow, as hundreds of employees head home from City Hall and other offices and stores, a younger crowd will begin arriving. Eventually, as many as 700 students - mostly school-age children - will go to the new Camden branch of Philadelphia's Settlement Music School. On once-empty sidewalks, youths will carry instrument cases and sheet music, ready to take classes in piano, guitar, voice, string, brass, woodwind and percussion.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Bristol Riverside Theatre's posters and program for A Little Night Music advertise the fact that it contains "Send in the Clowns. " The song, which serves as a musical metaphor for the show's characters who are foolish in their pursuit of sex and love, may also be applied to the production itself. This light, colorful version of the Stephen Sondheim musical is strong on humor, which makes it easy and enjoyable to watch. But A Little Night Music also deals with the pain and joy of emotional attachment and sexual passion, and that part of it is not so strongly revealed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
You are looking at Cezanne's The Large Bathers, noticing the contrasts of light and color, and appreciating the setting the Philadelphia Museum of Art has created for this masterwork. Around you are the usual gallery sounds - pencil scratching on paper, heels clicking on stone floors. And then, ever so faintly, comes something unexpected - the burnished-wood warmth of a hollow-body electric guitar, a pinging cymbal. You are drawn to the Great Stair Hall, and there, a jazz ensemble is playing "The Nearness of You" or "Like Someone In Love" for museumgoers clustered at small tables.
NEWS
July 11, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Although Irene Worth walked with legends and was easily their equal, the last standing actress of the Laurence Olivier generation of British thespians is, on a cloudy Sunday in a Manhattan rehearsal hall, struggling not just with a new role but with a new genre. Swathed in a trench coat to guard against the ill effects of the air-conditioning, swigging water from a S. Pellegrino bottle, she's becoming an aging sensualist in Stephen Sondheim's A Little Night Music, one who sings that when an aristocratic affair grew touchy, "I was deeded a duchy.
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