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Night School

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NEWS
December 17, 1986 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
All of Leroy C. Williams Jr.'s five daughters graduated from high school before he did. But tonight, at the age of 45, Williams will finally join his children among the ranks of the high school-educated. Williams is one of 17 adults, ranging in age from 18 to 45, who will receive diplomas from Glassboro High School as members of its Adult Night High School. The ceremony will take place at 8 p.m. at the George Beach Administration Building. "I put it off for years and years, and then I got up enough nerve to go," said Williams, a Franklinville resident.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
It isn't often that a school has a surplus of funds. When the Adult School Night for Chester County program found itself with an excess of $15,000 from tuition, the nonprofit organization presented the West Chester Area School District a check at a school board meeting last month. "The gift was made to East and Henderson High Schools, where we run many of our night courses," said Mary Berry, administrator for the night school. "We requested that it be used for the benefit of the most students possible.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bargain for adults with free time after work is the Main Line School Night, which offers nearly 400 courses at modest fees. Some of the courses are not available at colleges; but like colleges, the Night School's curriculum undergoes annual scrutiny to keep up with changing lifestyles. Courses are taught by certified instructors, and fees range from less than $5 a class for a 10-week course to $86 for a 15-week language course. Classes are held in the evenings at Radnor, Lower Merion, Harriton and Conestoga High Schools, and in the daytime at the school's headquarters, Creutzburg Center, on Gulph Creek Road in Radnor.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Classes usually fill within the first hour of adult night-school registration. Night-school teachers at Bucks County Technical School walk the long line of would-be students, announcing the names of classes that have been closed and apologizing to those who go home unregistered. Last week, the school's 45 daytime teachers declared they had been locked out by a new scheduling system; and television cameras converged to shoot picket lines and the faces of frustrated students. Meanwhile, interest in the evening classes has been abysmal.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There's an orange pamphlet circulating in Glassboro these days. It's a plea for money, but it doesn't come from any of the usual supplicants. No, this one comes from the school district, a publically funded entity now in search of private support. For 25 years, the school district has run a night school for adults who want to get their high school diplomas or who need help learning English. For those two programs, adult basic education and English as a second language, the district used to get $15,000 from the state.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a youngster, J. Mark Baiada thought about becoming a priest, until, he said, "I discovered girls. " By the time Baiada graduated from Rutgers University, he had a different plan - to start a business. On Saturday, his business, Bayada Home Health Care Inc., turns 40. Baiada, now 67, heads a company with 23,000 employees and about a billion dollars in revenue. On Jan. 17, 1975, when the company opened its doors in a modest office on Walnut Street, Baiada was 27. Question: How did you start?
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Classes on orchids, massage, Web page design and even rubber-stamp art are standards in adult education programs. But Owen J. Roberts' spring session will also provide two long-sought aids for night-school students on the run: day care at night, and home-cooked meals with no dishes to wash. In respond to the community's needs and because the program ran a debt last year, evening school director Susan Thompson coordinated a strategic planning group this year to conduct an extended survey of night school students.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unionville-Chadds Ford School District officials have decided to continue offering night-school courses to residents, but the program will no longer be run by parent volunteers. During a school board meeting Monday, board member Allen South said a task force had recommended that the school district hire a director for the evening classes, held at Unionville Middle School. The evening school had been coordinated by parent volunteers. Earlier this year, volunteers told the school board that the volume of paper work and class scheduling had grown too much for them to handle.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Earning a diploma in night school is getting an education the hard way. But, take the word of those who've done it, if you can make it through the night to reach graduation day, there is no satisfaction quite like it. As Judith Morgan, one recent graduate, put it: "I've been wearing a grin so wide it's pouring off my face. " Philadelphians by the thousands earn diplomas from night schools. Community College of Philadelphia alone has 10,000 adults enrolled in night courses - about 70 percent of this year's 1,026 graduates did all or part of their course work at night.
NEWS
October 26, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip J. Traino, 80, a career farmer who was president of the Vegetable Growers Association of New Jersey in 1976-78, died of heart failure Tuesday, Oct. 22, at his home in Marlton. As the longtime secretary of the organization, he was often the coordinator for its annual Atlantic City conventions. Mr. Traino was president of the Fathers Club at Bishop Eustace Preparatory School in Pennsauken in the mid-1980s and president of the Parents Association at Cook College of Rutgers University in 1988-89.
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BUSINESS
August 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Keith Zakarin has a tough argument to make, but that is, after all, what lawyers are paid to do. Zakarin is a partner at Center City's Duane Morris, where he chairs a practice group that represents more than a hundred career schools and colleges and industry groups. The firm is one of a handful nationwide that have made the sector a thriving, profitable practice. Its clients are largely vocational and occupational training programs; they teach a variety of trades and skills from cosmetology to nursing to criminal justice, among many others, with degree programs of up to four years.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
N. Leroy Kirk, 83, a lifelong resident of Broomall and a self-made businessman, died Tuesday, June 23, of complications from diabetes at Broomall Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. Known as "Le" to those close to him, Mr. Kirk was the son of Nelson L. and Katharine Lewis Kirk. A gentle man with a sense of humor, he was a birthright Quaker who lived a life "of peace and principle," his family said in a remembrance. After graduating from George School in 1950, Mr. Kirk studied engineering at Drexel University's night school.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a youngster, J. Mark Baiada thought about becoming a priest, until, he said, "I discovered girls. " By the time Baiada graduated from Rutgers University, he had a different plan - to start a business. On Saturday, his business, Bayada Home Health Care Inc., turns 40. Baiada, now 67, heads a company with 23,000 employees and about a billion dollars in revenue. On Jan. 17, 1975, when the company opened its doors in a modest office on Walnut Street, Baiada was 27. Question: How did you start?
NEWS
October 26, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip J. Traino, 80, a career farmer who was president of the Vegetable Growers Association of New Jersey in 1976-78, died of heart failure Tuesday, Oct. 22, at his home in Marlton. As the longtime secretary of the organization, he was often the coordinator for its annual Atlantic City conventions. Mr. Traino was president of the Fathers Club at Bishop Eustace Preparatory School in Pennsauken in the mid-1980s and president of the Parents Association at Cook College of Rutgers University in 1988-89.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A. Stuard Graham Jr., 82, of Ambler, a member of the Marine Corps detail guarding President Dwight D. Eisenhower at Camp David and later a businessman in Philadelphia's suburbs, died Monday, Sept. 23, of cancer, at his home. Known to friends as Drew, Mr. Graham was born in Philadelphia and raised in Jenkintown. At various times, he lived there, in Wyncote, and in Ambler. He graduated from William Penn Charter School in 1949 and in 1953 earned a bachelor of science degree from Lehigh University.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Edward J. Nolen, 80, of Cape May, a longtime accountant for the University of Pennsylvania, died of kidney failure on Wednesday, May 15, at St. Joseph Villa, a nursing-care facility in Flourtown. Born in Abington, Mr. Nolen graduated from La Salle College High School and earned a bachelor's degree in accounting at what is now La Salle University. A nephew, Jay McCarthy, said Mr. Nolen "went to college at nights," which was convenient because La Salle was "just down the street" from his home in Germantown.
SPORTS
May 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY has asked a Canadian high school to stop using an owl mascot that looks very much like its own. Temple officials said Thursday that the school in Kelowna, British Columbia, has agreed to change its symbol. The Kelowna Daily Courier reported that the local high school's scowling bird was virtually identical to Temple's Hooter the Owl. Kelowna Secondary School began using the symbol in 2002, after Temple had trademarked its image. It's not clear how the mascots ended up looking alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2013 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
When Debra Williams was growing up in West Philadelphia and later Wynnefield, her parents made it clear that going to college was mandatory. She did that and then some, proving along the way that a partnership between the body and mind is essential to achieving success, both physical and intellectual. Her parents were from South Carolina, where her father, Angelo, finished the eighth grade. In Philadelphia, he went to night school and earned his GED, and after working at a gas station, landed a job as a clerk with the IRS. Her mother, Grace, attended a junior college in South Carolina, where she earned an associate's degree.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Amy Worden
When the NCAA last week leveled potentially crippling sanctions on Penn State for failing to respond to sex-abuse allegations against Jerry Sandusky, the hand-wringing, soul-searching, and finger-pointing began anew. One phrase in particular delivered by NCAA president Mark Emmert hit home for me. He cautioned that one of the grave dangers in a sports-loving society is that sports themselves can become "too big to challenge. " It took me back 30 years to the campus of Boston College, when I was a student during a heady time for the sports-crazy Big East school.
FOOD
September 30, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peanuts are the problem. Tom Voravolya can't teach his popular Thai Cooking class at Lower Merion High School because so many Thai dishes contain peanuts, and so many schoolchildren today have serious food allergies. "They're allergic even to the scent," Voravolya says. "Our food has a very, very strong smell - and it stays around. If I cook something tonight, you'll still smell it in the room tomorrow. " The 20 adults enrolled in Voravolya's class at Main Line School Night didn't seem to mind last week.
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