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Night Sky

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NEWS
March 7, 1991 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
An unexplained light flashes across the night sky, who ya gonna call? Yesterday, after a brilliant green-and-red object lit up area skies for a few seconds about 3 a.m., night owls called the police, observatories, the airport and, of course, the People Paper. What was that thing? they wanted to know. Most scientific explanations settled on the Fireball Theory - a low-flying meteor burning up entering the Earth's atmosphere. But not everybody accepts routine scientific fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1994 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
You get two plays for the price of one in Night Sky, the drama by Susan Yankowitz that opened Wednesday in a Philadelphia Theatre Company production at the Plays and Players Theatre. But the deal isn't quite the bargain it might seem. The first of them is what I'll call the medical play, in which an astronomer named Anna is struck by a car, loses the ability to remember language and fights her way back to rudimentary communication. It takes place in a hospital and, later, in Anna's home, and it includes a sympathetic speech therapist and an older male patient in addition to Anna, her live-in lover and her teenage daughter.
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The Philadelphia Theater Co. has come to the end of its season with a prepossessing little play touching on a subject as wide as the universe. "Night Sky," which opened the other evening at Plays and Players, is just the ticket for sending one out into this world a mite more hopeful that everything is going to turn out all right - the cosmos permitting. The play by the New York writer Susan Yankowitz begins, innocently enough, with a bit of domestic warfare. Anna, a young professional astronomer, and Daniel, her lover, who is attempting to carve out a career as an opera singer, are at odds over a matter of personal space in their New York apartment.
NEWS
August 11, 2001
The sky is fading! The sky is fading! OK, on the scale of worrisome trade-offs of modern life, this doesn't rank up there with melting polar icecaps, drug-resistant microbes or chemical warfare. But a fascinating composite satellite image of the United States at night, released as part of a study this week, illuminates the problem of "light pollution. " Thanks to the proliferation of lights that the American lifestyle uses to fend off nighttime - on highways, billboards, parking lots, back porches and sandlot fields - the stars in the night sky are disappearing from view over big chunks of America.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Logan Pszalgowski can't believe his eyes. "I can see the whole moon," exclaims the 7-year-old Mount Laurel resident, his wonder-struck little voice rising into the night sky. Logan, his twin brother, Aidan, and their mother, Bonnie, are exploring the heavens through Steve Mattan's 80mm refracting telescope at a Star Watch sponsored by the Willingboro Astronomical Society. Mattan, 50, a software-development manager from Edgewater Park, is among about 20 amateur astronomers gathered in an open field near the Batsto Historic Village Visitor Center in Wharton State Forest.
NEWS
December 21, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The foot lights from a passing pair of sneakers and the glare from patrolling police car headlights were the only sources of illumination for a recent nighttime gathering of about 100 people in Rose Tree Park. Young, old, human and nonhuman (dogs, not aliens) got together on a chilly Friday evening to explore a mystery of the universe - the night sky. But clouds blocked their view of the planets, so Scott Manning of Astronomy To Go focused the 25-inch, $7,500 telescope on an earthly point of light.
NEWS
January 25, 2007 | By Christine Ma FOR THE INQUIRER
Marty Malloy has seen the rings of Saturn, Neptune, and galaxies far, far away. And it all began with something he couldn't see: the moon. A couple of years ago, the West Chester Postal Service worker took his 9-year-old granddaughter to watch a lunar eclipse at an observing session sponsored by the Chester County Astronomical Society (CCAS). Both were captivated. "It's a different perspective," Malloy said. "Being raised in the city [Philadelphia], everything was tied to the neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The theater director, Joseph Chaikin, who suffers from aphasia, wanted Susan Yankowitz to write a play about his condition. Chaikin was able to tell her the aphasic in the play should be an astronomer, but when the playwright asked why, all he could communicate was : "Stars . . . stars . . . so many stars . . . infinity. " That's typical of the way aphasics, who have a total or partial loss of their power to use words, talk. Chaikin knew what he wanted to say, but because of brain damage from a stroke he had suffered during open-heart surgery, he was unable to communicate in normal speech.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While he was a student at Harvard University, on Oct. 4, 1957, John Gaustad helped chronicle a major event in the history of astronomy. While working at the Smithsonian Observatory, he helped record and track the Soviet Union's launching of Sputnik, the first artificial satellite. Now, 41 years later, Gaustad is writing a new chapter in space knowledge by creating a map of the southern night sky. The appeal of the stars "is the concept of things far away and the vast reaches of time," Gaustad said.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY SPRINGS STATE PARK, Pa. - This is one of the darkest places in the Eastern United States, an oasis of blackness so deep it must be what our ancestors saw at night. A little after 9, as twilight turned itself down, Dwight Dulsky, an art teacher and amateur astronomer from Bucks County, saw the first light snap on. It was the bright star Vega, the master of ceremonies, opening the show on a rare, perfect night, with a clear sky and no moon over the endless, big woods of northern Pennsylvania.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sun and sand, of course, have always been the primary draw of the Jersey Shore. And certainly the lights and bright neon of the boardwalks and amusements at night will always beckon young and old. But the moonlight and natural phosphorescent glow on breaking waves have their charms, too. So those who venture out at night to experience the Shore - beyond, say, dinner and a movie, or a ride on a roller coaster - have the chance to think outside...
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'The moon has a strange look tonight . . . she is like a mad woman who is seeking everywhere for lovers . . . the clouds . . . clothe her nakedness but she won't let them . . . she reels through the clouds like a drunken woman. " And that's only a scene-setting speech in Oscar Wilde's lurid telling of how Princess Salome used her sexual wiles, amid the night sky, to bring about the execution of John the Baptist - magnified to the nth degree by Richard Strauss' scandalous music. Often presented in concert versions (by the Vienna Philharmonic and the Boston Symphony this spring alone)
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY SHAUN BRADY, For the Daily News
    FROM a distance, when illuminated, the circular sign hanging outside the Print Center, on Latimer Street, resembles a photograph of the sun ablaze with solar flares. As one approaches, however, the image reveals itself as a close-up of dog's fur. That sort of play between the astronomical and the everyday runs throughout "Canicular," artist Demetrius Oliver's new exhibition, which opened yesterday at the Print Center. The show, continuing through March 22, was inspired by Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, and particularly its nickname, the "Dog Star.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When artist Demetrius Oliver's exhibition "Canicular" opens at the Print Center on Friday, it will be months late. For that, you can blame the cosmos. "We had planned this exhibition for the fall," the center's assistant director, Ashley Peel Pinkham said. "But we had to move it, because the stars would not have been aligned at that time. " She meant that literally. The trouble was, the exhibition's centerpiece is a cylindrical, observatory-like space crowned by a video projection of Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, live-streamed from a telescope at the Franklin Institute.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Through the wide opening in a rooftop dome on the engineering building at Widener University, the most prominent feature of the view is a brilliantly lit Days Inn billboard. Focus a bit more, and you'll notice a cellphone tower, a patchwork of illuminated city buildings, and an airplane blinking across a grayish night sky. Harry Augensen has made it his mission to show residents of Chester that there are stars there, too. On many Monday and Friday evenings, he invites community members of all ages to the roof of Kirkbride Hall, where he runs Widener's observatory.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A possible meteor that blazed briefly but spectacularly across the Friday night sky was reported all along the Eastern seaboard, including the Philadelphia area. On Twitter, Alyson White of Philadelphia excitedly announced that she had seen a "huge shooting star. " "It was crazy," she wrote in an e-mail to The Inquirer. "I saw it at about 7:53. There was green, blue, and white rays coming off of it, and it was soaring through the sky, then it just like exploded and it was gone.
TRAVEL
January 8, 2012
10 for the Road Connecticut. The Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center, billed as the world's largest American Indian museum, presents "Pequot Lives: Almost Vanished. " The museum is located on Pequot Trail in Ledyard, near the Foxwoods Resort and Casino. www.pequotmuseum.org ; 800-411-9671. Delaware. Celebrate a maritime anniversary with "The Things They Carried Aboard Kalmar Nyckel, in 1637-38" - the ship's first transatlantic voyage, which brought the first permanent European settlers to Delaware and the Philadelphia region.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY SPRINGS STATE PARK, Pa. - This is one of the darkest places in the Eastern United States, an oasis of blackness so deep it must be what our ancestors saw at night. A little after 9, as twilight turned itself down, Dwight Dulsky, an art teacher and amateur astronomer from Bucks County, saw the first light snap on. It was the bright star Vega, the master of ceremonies, opening the show on a rare, perfect night, with a clear sky and no moon over the endless, big woods of northern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Logan Pszalgowski can't believe his eyes. "I can see the whole moon," exclaims the 7-year-old Mount Laurel resident, his wonder-struck little voice rising into the night sky. Logan, his twin brother, Aidan, and their mother, Bonnie, are exploring the heavens through Steve Mattan's 80mm refracting telescope at a Star Watch sponsored by the Willingboro Astronomical Society. Mattan, 50, a software-development manager from Edgewater Park, is among about 20 amateur astronomers gathered in an open field near the Batsto Historic Village Visitor Center in Wharton State Forest.
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