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Nightline

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NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer (David Walstad contributed to this column.)
Flamboyant fallen evangelist Jim Bakker and Nightline host Ted Koppel are going at it again. No doubt hoping to match the phenomenal numbers earned when Bakker appeared on May 27, Nightline is having Bakker back on Tuesday. Last time, ratings for the ABC late-night news show doubled and reached an all-time high. This time, however, Tammy Bakker - and her eyelashes - are staying home. No word on topics, but since Bakker last appeared, PTL successor Jerry Falwell has resigned and former church secretary Jessica Hahn has revealed herself, so to speak, in Playboy.
LIVING
September 8, 2000 | Rashod D. Ollison, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is late, and you should be asleep. But those sheep just won't jump that fence, so you turn on Nightline, which is airing a three-part series on hip hop on ABC. Picture it: a stone-faced, stiff-haired Ted Koppel introducing a segment on rap music and its movers and shakers. This should be interesting. Well, it's not. What you get, in this special that started Wednesday and ends tonight, is a surface documentary on a broad, mercurial movement. Take some grainy footage of a young Kurtis Blow and a few Kangol-sporting break dancers, add recent shots of LL Cool J receiving hugs and kisses from awestruck female fans, intersperse that with Puff Daddy video clips, and shazam!
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | by Margarita Diaz, New York Daily News
Univision, the Spanish-language network, is replacing its top-rated late-night newscast with a new, "Nightline"-inspired show called "Ultima Hora. " The switch takes place Monday. "We want to offer our audience a deeper understanding of news events," says "Ultima Hora" anchor Enrique Gratas. "Instead of the usual 11/2-minute story, we'll select the biggest three or four stories of the day and we'll break them down for our viewers. " The half-hour show will follow stories from the evening newscast, inviting experts, analysts and newsmakers.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Every weeknight at 11:30, Joelle Morton tapes Nightline twice - once on her VCR and once on her tape recorder. No, Morton is not a doting relative of Ted Koppel's - but she does hang on his every word. For the last 3 1/2 years, it has been Morton's job to produce the transcript of Nightline sold by Journal Graphics. As soon as Koppel says goodnight, she boots up her computer, puts the audio cassette in a foot- controlled transcribing machine and starts typing. She uses the videotape to check the spelling of names and to decipher the conversation when the talking heads get their tongues tangled.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Hey! May is shot already, and business planned for April is still unfinished. That's enough to give anyone a nasty disposition. Do you mind, just this once? Take the subject of journalism awards, an institution largely created and sustained by journalists to remind themselves of how nifty they are. The pick of the litter, of course, is the Pulitzer Prize. You don't knock it if you've won one, because it fattens the pay envelope. And you can't knock it if you haven't won one, because that would seem like sour grapes.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the incredulity likely shared by most of his viewers, Ted Koppel peered at Jim and Tammy Bakker on his magic TV wall Wednesday night and told them he was "in awe" that after hiding out for two months from hungry and aggressive news organizations, they had consented to appear on Nightline. Jim Bakker, who soloed briefly on the program in a taped interview Tuesday night, cleared up the matter succinctly. "We figured you were the toughest (interviewer) but also the fairest. " It's only part of the reason that the late-night ABC news show is the hottest hitter in the broadcast-news business.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | By Gail Shister, INQUIRER TELEVISION COLUMNIST
Nightline turns 20 tomorrow, but don't expect a birthday bash. Not in Washington, anyway. Anchor Ted Koppel and his producers may raise a glass or two of vodka in Moscow, where they're broadcasting a six-part series on Russia. "Ted likes celebrations, but he likes covering news a hell of a lot more," says Tom Bettag, 55, his executive producer and major bud for nine years. How much more? At 60, Koppel has devoted a full third of his life to Nightline, which began as 20-minute nightly updates on ABC called The Iran Crisis: America Held Hostage.
NEWS
February 17, 2013
Marvin Schlenker, 85, an Emmy Award-winning TV news and sports director, has died. Mr. Schlenker, a resident of Chestertown, Md., died Jan. 16 while on vacation in Florida. He was director of Nightline from its inception in the opening days of the Iran hostage crisis and won an Emmy for ABC's coverage of the 1968 Olympics. - The Record of Hackensack
NEWS
March 7, 2002 | By TED KOPPEL
I HAVE TO confess to a slightly perverse satisfaction at the outpouring of warm and generous support that my "Nightline" colleagues and I have received since news reports that our employers at ABC are negotiating with David Letterman to take over the time slot we currently occupy. The eulogies have been wonderful, but premature. "Nightline" (or some program strikingly similar to "Nightline") ought to have a place in television's expanding universe, and I am confident that it will.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1992 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Nobody's circling the wagons yet, but you can't say they're not looking over their shoulders. "Whatever happens, happens," says Jay Leno, asked about the prospect of competing, man to man, against David Letterman. "When you go against a worthy competitor . . . you'd like to win. But if you're going to get beaten, you'd like to get beaten by the best. " "Arsenio has profound respect for David Letterman," says Dana Freedman, vice president of marketing for Arsenio Hall Communications.
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NEWS
February 17, 2013
Marvin Schlenker, 85, an Emmy Award-winning TV news and sports director, has died. Mr. Schlenker, a resident of Chestertown, Md., died Jan. 16 while on vacation in Florida. He was director of Nightline from its inception in the opening days of the Iran hostage crisis and won an Emmy for ABC's coverage of the 1968 Olympics. - The Record of Hackensack
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2010
10 tonight CHANNEL 6 Go inside the mind of a psychopath to examine evil or violent behavior. Interviewed: Michael Benoit (right), whose wrestler son Chris killed his family and himself.
NEWS
May 29, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In response to persistent rumors that ABC paid Anthony Rakoczy for exclusive access, the network denied yesterday that it had reached a quid-pro-quo financial arrangement with Bonnie Sweeten's ex-husband. An ABC News spokesman said the network had bought a coach ticket on a commercial airline for Rakoczy to fly to Florida to claim his daughter Julia and two tickets for their return flight. The spokesman said those details would be disclosed during reports about the father-and-child reunion on Nightline last night and today on Good Morning America.
NEWS
April 29, 2004 | By Eils Lotozo and Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
ABC News anchor Ted Koppel has been covering the war in Iraq since it began, but tomorrow night his reporting will take an unusual form. In a special 40-minute edition of Nightline (11:35 p.m. on WPVI, Channel 6), Koppel will devote the entire show to reading the names of the more than 700 American military people killed in Iraq. As Koppel reads, photos of the dead will appear onscreen, along with captions listing their ages and hometowns. Nightline executive producer Leroy Sievers said the idea was to humanize the casualty statistics.
NEWS
March 7, 2002 | By TED KOPPEL
I HAVE TO confess to a slightly perverse satisfaction at the outpouring of warm and generous support that my "Nightline" colleagues and I have received since news reports that our employers at ABC are negotiating with David Letterman to take over the time slot we currently occupy. The eulogies have been wonderful, but premature. "Nightline" (or some program strikingly similar to "Nightline") ought to have a place in television's expanding universe, and I am confident that it will.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2001 | By Jennifer Weiner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's dispense with the qualifiers and cut to the chase: Robert Thompson, head of Syracuse University's Center for the Study of Popular Television, has the coolest job in the world. He can justify watching early-morning Flintstones, mid-afternoon soaps and Jerry Springer, or Survivor, or The Sopranos, all night long. Trips to the Old Country Buffet and the Home Depot fall under the category of "research," and 1970s cheese like CHiPS and The Love Boat gets reinvented as matter for serious academic inquiry.
LIVING
September 8, 2000 | Rashod D. Ollison, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is late, and you should be asleep. But those sheep just won't jump that fence, so you turn on Nightline, which is airing a three-part series on hip hop on ABC. Picture it: a stone-faced, stiff-haired Ted Koppel introducing a segment on rap music and its movers and shakers. This should be interesting. Well, it's not. What you get, in this special that started Wednesday and ends tonight, is a surface documentary on a broad, mercurial movement. Take some grainy footage of a young Kurtis Blow and a few Kangol-sporting break dancers, add recent shots of LL Cool J receiving hugs and kisses from awestruck female fans, intersperse that with Puff Daddy video clips, and shazam!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | By Gail Shister, INQUIRER TELEVISION COLUMNIST
Nightline turns 20 tomorrow, but don't expect a birthday bash. Not in Washington, anyway. Anchor Ted Koppel and his producers may raise a glass or two of vodka in Moscow, where they're broadcasting a six-part series on Russia. "Ted likes celebrations, but he likes covering news a hell of a lot more," says Tom Bettag, 55, his executive producer and major bud for nine years. How much more? At 60, Koppel has devoted a full third of his life to Nightline, which began as 20-minute nightly updates on ABC called The Iran Crisis: America Held Hostage.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | by Margarita Diaz, New York Daily News
Univision, the Spanish-language network, is replacing its top-rated late-night newscast with a new, "Nightline"-inspired show called "Ultima Hora. " The switch takes place Monday. "We want to offer our audience a deeper understanding of news events," says "Ultima Hora" anchor Enrique Gratas. "Instead of the usual 11/2-minute story, we'll select the biggest three or four stories of the day and we'll break them down for our viewers. " The half-hour show will follow stories from the evening newscast, inviting experts, analysts and newsmakers.
NEWS
August 7, 1999 | by David Bianculli, New York Daily News
They're treasures amid the trash - great television shows smack in the middle of that vast programming wasteland called summer. Impossible, you say? Think again. Before you channel-surf, give a look at these shows: "Nightline in Primetime," ABC, 10 p.m. Thursdays. This is "Nightline" with a twist. Host Ted Koppel turns to inventive correspondent Robert Krulwich to present a series of prime-time programs exploring how man and technology interact. And don't expect your typical "Nightline.
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