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NEWS
March 17, 1992 | By Gregory Spears, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Displaying a scrap of sheet metal and a worn shoe heel recovered from a remote atoll, a researcher claimed yesterday to have solved the mystery of Amelia Earhart's last flight, saying the pioneering pilot landed her plane on a Pacific island and died awaiting rescue. "She disappeared, and for 55 years there has been a mystery. Today that mystery has been solved," said Richard Gillespie, leader of an expedition to the island of Nikumaroro, where the artifacts were found in October.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A team of explorers announced yesterday that it will conduct a sea and land search this fall of a remote Pacific atoll where it believes that Amelia Earhart landed her plane 54 years ago and then perished of thirst. Members of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery said that they would try to solve one of aviation's most enduring mysteries with a two- week search of the uninhabited atoll, Nikumaroro. The searchers are following up on the 1989 discovery on the atoll of a small aluminum box that they say might be the map case from her plane.
NEWS
September 10, 2001 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Gillespie warned that the rusty looking blotch spotted by a satellite in the coral reef of a South Pacific island might not turn out to be the wreckage of Amelia Earhart's plane. "Chances are it won't pan out," Gillespie said before leaving to explore the island of Nikumaroro. He was right. Divers last week discovered that the rusty blotch is red algae. "No one was surprised," says a summary on the Web site of the Wilmington, Del.-based International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, founded by Gillespie in 1984.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer's $2.2 million search for Amelia Earhart's plane was about 2,000 miles off, if Australian David Billings is right. In 1945, an Australian army unit came across an engine in dense jungle on New Britain, a western Pacific island now part of Papua New Guinea. The aircraft engineer believes it was one of Earhart's engines because numbers handwritten on a map, supposedly by a member of that unit, correspond to an an engine from Earhart's Lockheed Model 10 Electra. The plane vanished in July 1937, as the famous flier and navigator Fred Noonan were over the Pacific, trying to finish up a round-the-world flight.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The giant coconut crabs threatened to steal the show, since they may have carted off most of Amelia Earhart's bones. But at the very end of last night's Discovery Channel special - a chronicling of setbacks and false alarms during a $2.2 million mid-Pacific search in July for the famed aviator's plane - a photograph was shown of possible wreckage. Supposedly the underwater image shows what could be a pulley, a fender and a wheel. "Breaking News. Debris Field Found," now proclaims TIGHAR.org, home page of the Delaware-based group behind the expedition.
NEWS
August 30, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
The Nai'a, a 120-foot charter boat from Fiji, bobbed just offshore Nikumaroro on the evening of July 24. The 2 1/2-mile-long, crescent-shaped atoll is miles southeast of Howland Island, Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan's final destination when they disappeared July 2, 1937. Inside the dining room of the vessel, the 15 members of the Niku V team took a break from scouring the atoll to celebrate a very special birthday - Earhart's 110th. Fijian crew members played birthday songs on guitars and ukuleles, and the windows were opened to allow the breeze - or, in the minds of those present, Earhart - to blow out the candles on the three-layer chocolate cake.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plane wreckage found on a remote island in the south Pacific Ocean last fall will be definitely linked to aviator Amelia Earhart's disappearance 55 years ago, experts who made the recovery said yesterday. Evidence establishing the link will be presented during a news conference tomorrow at the National Press Club in Washington, said Richard E. Gillespie, an aviation archaeologist and executive director of the Wilmington-based International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR)
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next few weeks might finally reveal what happened to the Amelia Earhart's attempted round-the-world flight 75 years ago. A $2.2 million expedition to a remote Pacific island is on its way back to Hawaii after gathering "volumes of sonar data and many hours of high-definition video," according to Monday's online update from TIGHAR, the Delaware-based group that organized the search. "Did TIGHAR's Niku VII expedition find the Earhart aircraft? It's far too early to say," reads the latest report at www.tighar.org . "Big pieces of airplane wreckage were not immediately apparent, but after 75 years in Nikumaroro's severe and unstable underwater environment, that is hardly surprising.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amelia Earhart is still lost. And Richard Gillespie is still looking. Gillespie, who heads a group that has tried for the last decade to solve the mystery of the aviator's disappearance July 2, 1937, had hoped to find an engine from her airplane on Canton Island in the South Pacific. But when he got to the island on Saturday, the dump where the engine was believed to be had been covered with debris. He thinks the engine is buried underneath, but his team had no way to dig it out. "Am I disappointed?
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of the 25 years he's been investigating the disappearance of famed aviator Amelia Earhart, Ric Gillespie has gotten little traction. Experts and various self-proclaimed skeptics have dismissed, doubted, and debunked his theory that she and her navigator did not plunge into the vastness of the Pacific, but instead lived as castaways on a pinpoint of land called Nikumaroro. A smudge in a 74-year-old photograph turned everything around. A forensic analyst in Washington thought it looked more like an object than a photographic defect.
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NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
This summer's $2.2 million search for Amelia Earhart's plane was about 2,000 miles off, if Australian David Billings is right. In 1945, an Australian army unit came across an engine in dense jungle on New Britain, a western Pacific island now part of Papua New Guinea. The aircraft engineer believes it was one of Earhart's engines because numbers handwritten on a map, supposedly by a member of that unit, correspond to an an engine from Earhart's Lockheed Model 10 Electra. The plane vanished in July 1937, as the famous flier and navigator Fred Noonan were over the Pacific, trying to finish up a round-the-world flight.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The giant coconut crabs threatened to steal the show, since they may have carted off most of Amelia Earhart's bones. But at the very end of last night's Discovery Channel special - a chronicling of setbacks and false alarms during a $2.2 million mid-Pacific search in July for the famed aviator's plane - a photograph was shown of possible wreckage. Supposedly the underwater image shows what could be a pulley, a fender and a wheel. "Breaking News. Debris Field Found," now proclaims TIGHAR.org, home page of the Delaware-based group behind the expedition.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next few weeks might finally reveal what happened to the Amelia Earhart's attempted round-the-world flight 75 years ago. A $2.2 million expedition to a remote Pacific island is on its way back to Hawaii after gathering "volumes of sonar data and many hours of high-definition video," according to Monday's online update from TIGHAR, the Delaware-based group that organized the search. "Did TIGHAR's Niku VII expedition find the Earhart aircraft? It's far too early to say," reads the latest report at www.tighar.org . "Big pieces of airplane wreckage were not immediately apparent, but after 75 years in Nikumaroro's severe and unstable underwater environment, that is hardly surprising.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most of the 25 years he's been investigating the disappearance of famed aviator Amelia Earhart, Ric Gillespie has gotten little traction. Experts and various self-proclaimed skeptics have dismissed, doubted, and debunked his theory that she and her navigator did not plunge into the vastness of the Pacific, but instead lived as castaways on a pinpoint of land called Nikumaroro. A smudge in a 74-year-old photograph turned everything around. A forensic analyst in Washington thought it looked more like an object than a photographic defect.
NEWS
August 30, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
The Nai'a, a 120-foot charter boat from Fiji, bobbed just offshore Nikumaroro on the evening of July 24. The 2 1/2-mile-long, crescent-shaped atoll is miles southeast of Howland Island, Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan's final destination when they disappeared July 2, 1937. Inside the dining room of the vessel, the 15 members of the Niku V team took a break from scouring the atoll to celebrate a very special birthday - Earhart's 110th. Fijian crew members played birthday songs on guitars and ukuleles, and the windows were opened to allow the breeze - or, in the minds of those present, Earhart - to blow out the candles on the three-layer chocolate cake.
NEWS
September 10, 2001 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Gillespie warned that the rusty looking blotch spotted by a satellite in the coral reef of a South Pacific island might not turn out to be the wreckage of Amelia Earhart's plane. "Chances are it won't pan out," Gillespie said before leaving to explore the island of Nikumaroro. He was right. Divers last week discovered that the rusty blotch is red algae. "No one was surprised," says a summary on the Web site of the Wilmington, Del.-based International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, founded by Gillespie in 1984.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amelia Earhart is still lost. And Richard Gillespie is still looking. Gillespie, who heads a group that has tried for the last decade to solve the mystery of the aviator's disappearance July 2, 1937, had hoped to find an engine from her airplane on Canton Island in the South Pacific. But when he got to the island on Saturday, the dump where the engine was believed to be had been covered with debris. He thinks the engine is buried underneath, but his team had no way to dig it out. "Am I disappointed?
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | By Gregory Spears, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Displaying a scrap of sheet metal and a worn shoe heel recovered from a remote atoll, a researcher claimed yesterday to have solved the mystery of Amelia Earhart's last flight, saying the pioneering pilot landed her plane on a Pacific island and died awaiting rescue. "She disappeared, and for 55 years there has been a mystery. Today that mystery has been solved," said Richard Gillespie, leader of an expedition to the island of Nikumaroro, where the artifacts were found in October.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plane wreckage found on a remote island in the south Pacific Ocean last fall will be definitely linked to aviator Amelia Earhart's disappearance 55 years ago, experts who made the recovery said yesterday. Evidence establishing the link will be presented during a news conference tomorrow at the National Press Club in Washington, said Richard E. Gillespie, an aviation archaeologist and executive director of the Wilmington-based International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR)
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A team of explorers announced yesterday that it will conduct a sea and land search this fall of a remote Pacific atoll where it believes that Amelia Earhart landed her plane 54 years ago and then perished of thirst. Members of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery said that they would try to solve one of aviation's most enduring mysteries with a two- week search of the uninhabited atoll, Nikumaroro. The searchers are following up on the 1989 discovery on the atoll of a small aluminum box that they say might be the map case from her plane.
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