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BUSINESS
July 11, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia-area union leaders warned yesterday that workplaces will become more dangerous and less healthy unless a cost-cutting decision by the Reagan administration can be reversed. The administration plans to close the Philadelphia regional office of the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, commonly called NIOSH, union officials said. "We look at this in terms of workers' rights," said Robert Brown, president of United Electrical Workers District Council No. 1. "We are taking attacks from the left and right in the workplace today, and big business would like nothing better than not to have to answer to NIOSH.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
After repairs to the ventilation system at a district building failed to clear the air about health concerns, officials have asked a federal agency to test the air at the Central Bucks East High School. During a meeting Thursday morning, school officials and teachers from Central Bucks East discussed their concerns. They also reviewed a letter, sent Monday to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which requested a health-hazard evaluation of the building in Buckingham Township, according to district business manager Gene P. Abel.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal industrial hygienist has advised Bucks County authorities that they need to improve the air in the county's Doylestown courthouse and administration building, according to a health department official. The hygienist, who had studied samples of the buildings' air, found it "not satisfactory," said Gordian V. Erlacher, the county's public health administrator. Frank A. Lewis, the hygienist for the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), gave a "verbal summary" of his report last week to county officials, Erlacher said.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal officials have called for immediate steps to reduce hazards to workers in the Paoli rail yard after discovering the worst level of PCB contamination ever found by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The high level of contamination with the suspected cancer-causing agent calls for emergency action to protect workers at the yard, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency spokesman said today. The spokesman, Ray Germann, said a NIOSH recommendation that railyard workers be equipped with protective clothing "absolutely must be carried out immediately.
NEWS
January 23, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal health officials last month issued a harsh critique of a Rohm & Haas investigation into a series of brain cancers at its main research center, and the company said yesterday that it would hire an external academic team to take over the investigation. The change in approach comes three weeks after the Philadelphia chemical-maker told employees there was no statistically significant increase in brain cancers at the research center in Spring House, Montgomery County. The federal review, conducted at the company's invitation by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The head of a union representing SEPTA workers at the PCB-laden Paoli rail yard has called for the testing of other SEPTA rail yards to see if they are also tainted with the suspected carcinogen. Charles Little, president of Transport Workers Union Local 2013, in an interview Thursday called for the testing of SEPTA's Powelton Avenue, Roberts Avenue and Wayne Junction rail yards in Philadelphia after officials of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The federal government has added about 50 types of cancer to the list of 9/11 World Trade Center-related illnesses that will be covered by a program to pay for health coverage. The National Institute for Occupational Safety announced the change Monday, the eve of the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks. "The publication of this final rule marks an important step in the effort to provide needed treatment and care to 9/11 responders and survivors through the WTC Health Program," NIOSH director Dr. John Howard said in a statement.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
My beloved Cratemobile, the battered Chinese 10-speed that I rescued from the trash and equipped with a milk crate, finally conked out last winter. When I bought a new bike, I also bought a new kind of seat - one without a nose. I use my bike to perform errands and commute to the Word Mill. Over the years, cycling with a conventional seat has irritated my male plumbing. A while back, my urologist, alarmed by the condition of my prostate, asked, "Do you do a lot of bike riding?"
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | By Rachel E. Stassen-Berger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parents and Downingtown Area School District officials disagree on how sick the six-year-old Shamona Creek Elementary School is, but a federal safety agency has been asked to examine the building. Debbie Seibert-Smith, a parent of two children who attend the school in Wallace Township, believes the air in the building, which houses 866 district children, made her previously healthy children ill, she said. "Both my kids came down with bronchitis and pneumonia, and now they both have scarred lungs," said Seibert-Smith.
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State and federal officials are launching investigations into the deaths of three firefighters in the July 4 inferno in Gloucester City. The state Department of Labor will be looking into such questions as to whether the firefighters were properly equipped and trained for going into a burning building, said department spokesman Kevin Smith. The probe is required by law and resembles investigations conducted by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration into workplace fatalities.
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NEWS
September 11, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The federal government has added about 50 types of cancer to the list of 9/11 World Trade Center-related illnesses that will be covered by a program to pay for health coverage. The National Institute for Occupational Safety announced the change Monday, the eve of the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks. "The publication of this final rule marks an important step in the effort to provide needed treatment and care to 9/11 responders and survivors through the WTC Health Program," NIOSH director Dr. John Howard said in a statement.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
My beloved Cratemobile, the battered Chinese 10-speed that I rescued from the trash and equipped with a milk crate, finally conked out last winter. When I bought a new bike, I also bought a new kind of seat - one without a nose. I use my bike to perform errands and commute to the Word Mill. Over the years, cycling with a conventional seat has irritated my male plumbing. A while back, my urologist, alarmed by the condition of my prostate, asked, "Do you do a lot of bike riding?"
BUSINESS
January 26, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three more lawsuits were filed yesterday against Rohm & Haas Co. by the families of former employees with brain tumors, including one new patient whose case was not previously disclosed. The new case is what's known as a "benign" tumor, though the patient, Martina Granger, suffered seizures until she underwent surgery in October and is now dealing with speech and language deficits, her attorney said. That brings the tally of benign tumors to five among those who worked at the chemical company's main research facility, in Spring House, Montgomery County.
NEWS
January 23, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal health officials last month issued a harsh critique of a Rohm & Haas investigation into a series of brain cancers at its main research center, and the company said yesterday that it would hire an external academic team to take over the investigation. The change in approach comes three weeks after the Philadelphia chemical-maker told employees there was no statistically significant increase in brain cancers at the research center in Spring House, Montgomery County. The federal review, conducted at the company's invitation by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State and federal officials are launching investigations into the deaths of three firefighters in the July 4 inferno in Gloucester City. The state Department of Labor will be looking into such questions as to whether the firefighters were properly equipped and trained for going into a burning building, said department spokesman Kevin Smith. The probe is required by law and resembles investigations conducted by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration into workplace fatalities.
NEWS
October 31, 1997 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The International Association of Fire Fighters is requesting that the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health investigate the circumstances surrounding Monday's deaths of two city firefighters killed while battling a small basement blaze in West Oak Lane. A letter requesting the investigation - and expressing concern over whether there was adequate staffing and support at the scene - was sent yesterday to the institute's director, said IAFF spokesman George Burke.
LIVING
May 26, 1996 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are wonderful things about summer jobs - you make money, gain skills, acquaint yourself with the wonderful world of customer service, cashing a paycheck, and "Do you want fries with that?" But summer jobs also can be deadly; 80 adolescents died on the job in 1992-93, the last figures available. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), hundreds are hospitalized every year, and tens of thousands wind up in emergency rooms. So where don't you want to work?
BUSINESS
November 5, 1995 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A farm can be a dangerous place. Jere Wingert found that out on the afternoon of Oct. 4, 1993. It was the last time that Wingert ever sat on a farm machine with his own two legs under him. The machine was harvesting the corn, he recalled, but it "clogged up and I tried to unclog it. " Wingert pulled loose the clog of corn stalks, from a huge corkscrew device known as an auger. He prided himself on doing it fast, while the auger was still running. Then he slipped on dust from the corn stalks, fell against the whirling corkscrew, and his life changed.
NEWS
May 27, 1995
In 1970, the federal government tried to give workers a little more protection against the dangers they can encounter on the job. For 25 years since, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration has tracked and sought to curb the ills, injuries and fatalities of the workplace. Backed by its research arm, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, it has urged precautions, drafted rules and levied fines in an effort to make job sites safer. The successes of OHSA and NIOSH - such as discovering a way to reduce the number of deaths from trench cave-ins - have not only spared many workers from calamity, but also saved many employers workers' compensation costs and production downtime.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | By Rachel E. Stassen-Berger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parents and Downingtown Area School District officials disagree on how sick the six-year-old Shamona Creek Elementary School is, but a federal safety agency has been asked to examine the building. Debbie Seibert-Smith, a parent of two children who attend the school in Wallace Township, believes the air in the building, which houses 866 district children, made her previously healthy children ill, she said. "Both my kids came down with bronchitis and pneumonia, and now they both have scarred lungs," said Seibert-Smith.
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