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Nitrous Oxide

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NEWS
October 23, 2000 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten tanks filled with highly intoxicating nitrous oxide being sold to fans before yesterday's Philadelphia Eagles game were seized by officials from the city Department of Licenses and Inspections. Balloons filled with the gas have become a growing fad among some Eagles fans, who inhale the gas before home games. Inhaling nitrous oxide, better known as laughing gas, can produce a quick high. Because possessing nitrous oxide is not illegal in Pennsylvania, Andrea Swan, an L&I spokeswoman, said those selling it outside Veterans Stadium yesterday were cited for being in a restricted area of the parking lot and for not having the proper vending permission from Ogden Entertainment, the concessionaire that oversees vending at the stadium.
NEWS
October 13, 2000 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The theft of five cylinders of nitrogen gas from a storage area at Warminster Hospital Wednesday came five days after an attempted theft of nitrogen at Grand View Hospital in West Rockhill, police said yesterday. Police added that they hoped security videos from the hospitals would lead them to the thieves. The gas, which could prove deadly if inhaled, was apparently mistaken, police said, for nitrous oxide, which has been used for quick highs by teenagers and others inhaling it from balloons or plastic bags.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | By Angela Valdez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 16-year-old Bordentown girl died after inhaling nitrous oxide at her home, authorities said yesterday. The girl, Heather Morrow, became unconscious after inhaling the gas from a plastic bag Tuesday. Bordentown Township police and emergency personnel arrived at her home in the first block of Holloway Lane about 2 p.m. and attempted to resuscitate her. Morrow was taken to Robert Wood Johnson Hospital in Hamilton Township, where she was pronounced dead at 2:51 p.m., authorities said.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
When Medford Township dentist M. Jeffrey Morton discovered that two tanks of nitrous oxide had been stolen from a shed in the back of his office more than two weeks ago, he did not laugh. Nor was he shocked. "It was bound to have happened," he said. "I have practiced in Medford for 12 years and nothing has ever happened to me. " Medford police, who were summoned to the office in the Ironstone Village on Stokes Road on June 11, said their investigation has led them to believe the theft was connected to two Grateful Dead concerts - June 15 and 16 - at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | By David Lee Preston and John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writers
A whiff of high intrigue that had surrounded the Grateful Dead since last month evaporated yesterday when police arrested three men in the theft of nitrous oxide tanks from a Medford Township dentist. After the nitrous oxide - an anesthetic sometimes called laughing gas - was stolen June 7, police said that because laughing gas was reportedly sold at the band's concerts, they figured the gas was stolen in connection with two Grateful Dead concerts June 15 and 16 at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | By Angela Valdez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Janice Hughes spoke with her granddaughter for the last time on Halloween morning. She called from work to tell 16-year-old Heather Morrow where to find the candy, expecting her to empty the bag she had hidden before trick-or-treaters arrived. When Hughes stepped through the door of her Bordentown home that evening, the Snickers bag sat, untouched, on the kitchen table. Hours earlier, Morrow inhaled nitrous oxide from a plastic garbage bag placed over her head. The giddy high might have lasted a few minutes before she passed out. She most likely asphyxiated within five minutes.
NEWS
December 18, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police officers patrolling the Dave Matthews concert at the First Union Center last night were on the lookout for four canisters of nitrous oxide stolen from a Northeast Philadelphia hospital. The chemical, commonly known as laughing gas, is inhaled by teenagers and others to obtain a quick high, described as a feeling of giddiness or light-headedness. Police have said its use is popular outside Veterans Stadium before Eagles games and before concerts, but at least two people have died this fall after inhaling it. Sgt. Joseph Gindele said a nun at Nazareth Hospital who was looking out a window in the convent nearby saw the burglary, which occurred about 9:45 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Sorry to burst your balloon, Eagles fans, but your favorite pre-game chemical is gone with the wind. Police and city licensing officials yesterday swarmed through Veterans Stadium parking lots and confiscated at least a dozen tanks of buzz-inducing nitrous oxide. Then, just hours before the Eagles coincidentally sleep-walked past the Chicago Bears, the mild anesthesia was released into the atmosphere. The show of force was prompted by Daily News reports of rowdy, gas-intoxicated fans outside the Vet, officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | By Louis R. Carlozo, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The theft last week of potentially fatal nitrous oxide, better known as "laughing gas," is no laughing matter to Cherry Hill police. The stuff could kill someone, they say. Police are still searching for two 3-foot-long blue steel canisters that contained the gas, stolen between 5 p.m. Thursday and 11 a.m. Friday from a dentist's office in the 100 block of Haddontowne Court, investigator William J. Kushina said yesterday. The canisters - marked only with the words "Puritan-Bennett nitrous oxide" and owned by Lamont Medical Equipment Co. of Camden - contained a pure form of the gas, which dentists combine with oxygen before giving to their patients.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A 36-year-old woman who was said to be inhaling nitrous oxide while driving was killed yesterday on Route 413 in Buckingham Township when her Chevrolet Citation veered into oncoming traffic and smashed head-on into a Nissan Pathfinder. A two-foot-long cylindrical tank of nitrous oxide was found in the mangled Citation along with balloons, police said. Nitrous oxide, better known as laughing gas, is sometimes used as a drug, with the user inhaling the gas from balloons filled from a tank.
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NEWS
December 16, 2011 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
A BOTCHED autoerotic episode - not foul play - was what led to the bizarre death of Peter Stelzenmuller in the summer, police said yesterday. The Drexel Hill man was found dead Aug. 18 in his attic near a scuba suit and a mask. Stelzenmuller, 49, an engineer, reportedly shared his home, on Hillcrest Road near Irvington, with Edythe Maa, 29, a former dominatrix known as "Mistress Jade Vixen," who dropped out of grad school at the University of Pennsylvania. Since 2008, Maa has been involved in a series of strange and deadly incidents involving her former clients.
SPORTS
August 31, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Suppose TV covered sports the way it does hurricanes: "Thanks for joining us. We're here in Hour 7 of our round-the-clock coverage of Ankle of Doom: '11. Let's go right out to Glenn "Synovial Joint" Mathers at Eagles camp. Glenn?" "Right, Serena. As you can probably tell, the air here at the NovaCare Complex is thick with panic as we await the arrival of the MRI results on Rush Swift's left-ankle strain. As you know, our worst-case computer projections are showing that Swift will be dead by nightfall.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | By Debra Nussbaum
It seems as if no matter how many times you tell young people about all the dangers of life, some of them still slip through the cracks. When I read the story about Justin Zuber, a 16-year-old student at the Academy of the New Church Secondary School in Bryn Athyn who was found dead in his dormitory room with a plastic bag containing a can of air freshener on his head (Feb. 20, "Warnings on 'huffing' unheeded"), I thought about all the times I've talked to my own kids about "huffing.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | By Adam L. Cataldo INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ted Toy was hard to miss. Perhaps it was because the former offensive lineman for Paul VI High School - at 6-foot-4 and 240 pounds - was so big. Many people say it was his sense of humor, the way he made up his own words and gave people nicknames. But since they came to school Thursday morning, students and faculty at Paul VI in Haddon Township have missed Toy. Toy, 17, a senior, died while inhaling nitrous oxide Wednesday night. The gas is available in a small, metal cylinder known as a whippet.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | By Angela Valdez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Janice Hughes spoke with her granddaughter for the last time on Halloween morning. She called from work to tell 16-year-old Heather Morrow where to find the candy, expecting her to empty the bag she had hidden before trick-or-treaters arrived. When Hughes stepped through the door of her Bordentown home that evening, the Snickers bag sat, untouched, on the kitchen table. Hours earlier, Morrow inhaled nitrous oxide from a plastic garbage bag placed over her head. The giddy high might have lasted a few minutes before she passed out. She most likely asphyxiated within five minutes.
NEWS
December 18, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police officers patrolling the Dave Matthews concert at the First Union Center last night were on the lookout for four canisters of nitrous oxide stolen from a Northeast Philadelphia hospital. The chemical, commonly known as laughing gas, is inhaled by teenagers and others to obtain a quick high, described as a feeling of giddiness or light-headedness. Police have said its use is popular outside Veterans Stadium before Eagles games and before concerts, but at least two people have died this fall after inhaling it. Sgt. Joseph Gindele said a nun at Nazareth Hospital who was looking out a window in the convent nearby saw the burglary, which occurred about 9:45 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | By Angela Valdez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 16-year-old Bordentown girl died after inhaling nitrous oxide at her home, authorities said yesterday. The girl, Heather Morrow, became unconscious after inhaling the gas from a plastic bag Tuesday. Bordentown Township police and emergency personnel arrived at her home in the first block of Holloway Lane about 2 p.m. and attempted to resuscitate her. Morrow was taken to Robert Wood Johnson Hospital in Hamilton Township, where she was pronounced dead at 2:51 p.m., authorities said.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ten tanks filled with highly intoxicating nitrous oxide being sold to fans before yesterday's Philadelphia Eagles game were seized by officials from the city Department of Licenses and Inspections. Balloons filled with the gas have become a growing fad among some Eagles fans, who inhale the gas before home games. Inhaling nitrous oxide, better known as laughing gas, can produce a quick high. Because possessing nitrous oxide is not illegal in Pennsylvania, Andrea Swan, an L&I spokeswoman, said those selling it outside Veterans Stadium yesterday were cited for being in a restricted area of the parking lot and for not having the proper vending permission from Ogden Entertainment, the concessionaire that oversees vending at the stadium.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Sorry to burst your balloon, Eagles fans, but your favorite pre-game chemical is gone with the wind. Police and city licensing officials yesterday swarmed through Veterans Stadium parking lots and confiscated at least a dozen tanks of buzz-inducing nitrous oxide. Then, just hours before the Eagles coincidentally sleep-walked past the Chicago Bears, the mild anesthesia was released into the atmosphere. The show of force was prompted by Daily News reports of rowdy, gas-intoxicated fans outside the Vet, officials said.
NEWS
October 13, 2000 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The theft of five cylinders of nitrogen gas from a storage area at Warminster Hospital Wednesday came five days after an attempted theft of nitrogen at Grand View Hospital in West Rockhill, police said yesterday. Police added that they hoped security videos from the hospitals would lead them to the thieves. The gas, which could prove deadly if inhaled, was apparently mistaken, police said, for nitrous oxide, which has been used for quick highs by teenagers and others inhaling it from balloons or plastic bags.
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