IN THE NEWS

Nix

NEWS
December 9, 1992 | By Emilie Lounsberry and Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Chief Justice Robert N. C. Nix Jr. said yesterday that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court had declined to accept his proposal to appoint a commission to examine Justice Rolf Larsen's allegations of ethical violations by members of the high court. The unwillingness of his colleagues to go along with Nix's proposal was the latest example of the court's turmoil following the accusations of wrongdoing made by Larsen two weeks ago. The statement issued by Nix did not say how many of the justices did not go along with his proposal or why, and Nix's spokesman, Linn Washington, said he did not know which justices had declined to accept the plan.
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | By Emilie Lounsberry and Robert Zausner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gelles contributed to this article
Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr., the first African American to head the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, said yesterday he had decided to retire early. Nix, 67, who led the court through a turbulent era, said that it was time for him "to walk away and smell the daisies" and that he would leave by the end of the year. He could have served until 1998, when he will turn 70, the state's mandatory retirement age for judges. "I have come to the conclusion that this is the appropriate time to leave," Nix said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | By Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court judge yesterday questioned the intervention of state Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. in a 1985 murder trial, and said the proceedings were "totally irregular" and marked by "horrendous" overreaching. The comments by Judge Robert E. Cowen of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit came during oral argument in the case of David Lee Yohn, who was convicted of murdering an alleged drug dealer in an Allentown trial. "The entire scenario here is, to me, is unbelievable.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Today, without fanfare, an era ends on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. - who joined the court nearly a quarter-century ago, who became the first African American to head any state's highest court, and who weathered the most turbulent period in the Pennsylvania high court's history - retires today. For Nix, who turned 68 this month, it has been a quiet departure. There have been no ceremonies, no state-level proclamations, no official marking of the occasion, although state and local bar associations plan to honor him in September.
LIVING
January 24, 1999 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was born a Daniel. But the nickname Danny more becomes a baby, and so he was called that, until he outgrew it. Then, as a teen, he answered to a simple Dan, a comfortable, casual fit, like a pair of well-worn jeans. Now, Dan is a college man. And Dan, simple, casual Dan, isn't the first impression he wants to make. He wants a proper name, one with heft, complexity, one that signifies a certain maturity. Daniel has arrived, as in Daniel Immerwahr, 18, a freshman at Columbia University who hails from Swarthmore.
NEWS
May 9, 1995 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has found that the intervention of Pennsylvania Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. in a 1985 murder trial constituted "gross abuse" of the justice's authority and deprived the defendant of the right to a fair trial. U.S. District Judge Clarence C. Newcomer ordered that David Lee Yohn, 50, who was convicted in Lehigh County and sentenced to life in prison, be retried within 120 days or released. In an unusually harsh opinion, Newcomer also said the state Supreme Court was "unprincipled" in the way it rejected Yohn's appeal for a new trial.
NEWS
March 8, 1996 | By Emilie Lounsberry and Robert Zausner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Now the guessing game begins. After the disclosure by Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. that he will retire early from the state Supreme Court, politicians, lawyers and judges yesterday began tossing around names of who might be tapped for an interim post on the high court. Names such as their own. At Philadelphia city Democratic headquarters on Walnut Street, Chairman Robert A. Brady's phone was ringing off the hook. Brady said up to 30 calls came from lawyers and judges - suggesting themselves as successors.
NEWS
May 10, 1995 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee said yesterday that a federal judge's scorching criticism of Chief Justice Robert N. C. Nix Jr. and the state Supreme Court is further evidence of the need for court reforms. Rep. Jeffrey E. Piccola (R., Dauphin) said U.S. District Judge Clarence C. Newcomer's denouncement of Nix's intervention in a 1985 murder trial would impel his committee to pass legislation that, among other things, would strip some of the high court's powers, including administrative duties.
NEWS
June 10, 1996 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has worn the black judicial robes for 25 years. Performed loads of civic and professional deeds. Won awards enough to paper a wall. But this might be the most persuasive line on Superior Court Judge Vincent A. Cirillo's two-page resume: Sixty-eight years of age; born December 19, 1927. Cirillo, of Narberth, is lobbying Gov. Ridge and assorted state senators to make him a Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice. He wants to fill the $110,963 vacancy expected to be created at the end of next month, when Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. has said he will retire.
NEWS
February 21, 1986 | By TONI LOCY, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writers Vince Kasper and Kit Konolige contributed to this report.)
The siege at Traffic Court is over. President Judge Salvatore DeMeo yesterday promised state Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. that he will cooperate with Royal D. Hart, the chief clerk appointed by a citizens' committee created by Nix to clean up the troubled court. By agreeing to cooperate with Hart, DeMeo avoided being suspended as president judge. DeMeo told the Daily News yesterday he made "several" mistakes, but said he had believed he was right on Tuesday, in trying to fire Hart after Hart attempted to abolish the jobs of eight longtime employees.
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