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NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are several ways to increase ridership and revenue on the Atlantic City Rail Line, according to a study commissioned by NJ Transit, but the agency doesn't plan to do any of them. With NJ Transit strapped for money and Atlantic City losing casinos, visitors, and employees, the transit agency has shelved the recommendations of a study that was authorized in 2009 by the Corzine administration. "NJ Transit does not have any immediate plans to begin action on any of the proposals in the analysis," spokesman William J. Smith said in an e-mail.
NEWS
August 14, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NJ Transit and SEPTA will sell tickets to all of each other's stations, as part of a joint ticketing operation announced yesterday. Tickets to SEPTA and NJ Transit destinations are now available at NJ Transit vending machines, at rail ticket windows at the Trenton station, and at SEPTA ticket windows at Suburban and Market East stations. (SEPTA padlocked the last of its ticket-vending machines in January 2007, citing their inability to accept newly designed U.S. currency.) Fares will not be affected.
NEWS
October 28, 1997 | By Shannon Owens, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer staff writer Alan Sipress contributed to this article
An agreement was reached yesterday to keep NJ Transit commuter trains rolling in the event of a threatened Amtrak strike tomorrow. The deal, reached yesterday between NJ Transit, Amtrak and the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees, will allow NJ Transit to continue to operate commuter trains on the Northeast Corridor Line, the Raritan Valley Line and the North Jersey Coast Line. Without the agreement, 65,000 riders would have had to find alternate transportation. "This is a short-term plan," said Jeff Macklin, spokesman for the New Jersey Department of Transportation.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - NJ Transit on Monday revealed a newly designed ticket, part of an effort to combat the counterfeiting that officials say is costing the agency as much as $3 million a year. More than 200 people, a small percentage of them employees but mostly riders, were arrested for ticket fraud in the last 18 months, NJ Transit Police Chief Christopher Trucillo said. "These are not victimless crimes," Trucillo said. "These criminal acts financially penalize the hundreds of thousands of NJ Transit customers who lawfully utilize our system every weekday.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
NJ Transit's first rider survey since Hurricane Sandy shows improved customer satisfaction with the agency. The overall customer satisfaction rating in the survey released Tuesday was 6.4 out of 10. The figures were 6.0 just before the storm and 5.2 in 2011, when the commuter scorecard was first implemented. - AP  
NEWS
February 28, 2012
A train headed from Philadelphia to Atlantic City struck an unoccupied vehicle Tuesday evening in Berlin, N.J., an NJ Transit spokeswoman said. The accident occurred at the Washington Avenue crossing around 6:30 p.m., said Courtney Carroll. No one was injured on the train, which was carrying 130 passengers. A preliminary report said the car got stuck on the track and at least one occupant was able to get out before the train hit, Carroll said. The No. 4635 train left Philadelphia at 5:48 p.m. The passengers were to be transferred to buses.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | Inquirer photos by Gerald S. Williams
The emphasis was on safety yesterday as third and fourth graders at Camden's Cooper's Poynt Elementary School learned the do's and dont's of riding buses and trains from New Jersey Transit representatives. Students toured a bus, received coloring books and saw slides about public transportation.
NEWS
September 17, 2008 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An out-of-control NJ Transit truck plowed through two street lights, two trees and two garbage cans in a heavily trafficked area near Camden City Hall yesterday, but did not hit any pedestrians or other vehicles. Paramedics and city firefighters worked to extract a middle-aged NJ Transit driver from his vehicle, which came to a stop at the fence of a parking lot at Broadway and Market Street about 10 a.m. The man was alone in the vehicle and appeared to be conscious when he was put on a stretcher and taken to Cooper University Hospital.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | By Karen Weintraub, Special to The Inquirer United Press International contributed to this article
The Burlington County Human Services building in Westampton Township will not be cut off to public transportation as county officials had feared, the New Jersey Transit Board of Directors decided this week. Bus Route 458, which includes the Human Services building on Woodlane Road and Route 541, scheduled to be completed late next year, had been slated for elimination. Two other South Jersey bus routes were also saved by the transit board on Wednesday when it voted to approve fare increases on some bus and train routes in North Jersey.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Karen Rouse, THE RECORD
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. - Bicycle riders from across the state have called on NJ Transit to change its policy covering bikes on trains, which the cyclists say leaves most of them stranded at stations. The policy - which allows bikers to take their wheels onto trains only at stations with high-level platforms - is particularly distressing to bikers in Bergen and Passaic Counties because most stations have low-level platforms, said Andrew Besold, one of 150 biking enthusiasts who participated in the New Jersey Bike and Walk Summit held Saturday at the Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are several ways to increase ridership and revenue on the Atlantic City Rail Line, according to a study commissioned by NJ Transit, but the agency doesn't plan to do any of them. With NJ Transit strapped for money and Atlantic City losing casinos, visitors, and employees, the transit agency has shelved the recommendations of a study that was authorized in 2009 by the Corzine administration. "NJ Transit does not have any immediate plans to begin action on any of the proposals in the analysis," spokesman William J. Smith said in an e-mail.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Henry C. McGettigan's mother died when he was 9, he would spend some of his summer days with his maternal grandmother in North Philadelphia. "She would pack a lunch for him" and send him off to Shibe Park at 21st Street and Lehigh Avenue, the home of both the Athletics and the Phillies, daughter Theresa Miller said in a phone interview. "He would go and sit outside and listen to the game," through the roars of the crowds, in the days before portable radios, because he didn't have enough money to buy a ticket.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN NJ Transit is spending $300,000 this year to study possible expansion of the Walter Rand Transportation Center in downtown Camden, the new executive director of the transit agency said Tuesday. The new study comes more than four years after NJ Transit approved - but did not build - a new $3 million bus-loading center at the site. Plans for revamping the transit center, which connects South Jersey bus routes, the River Line light-rail line, and the PATCO commuter rail line, have been on hold while business and civic leaders debate what needs to be done in the central Camden location.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
When New Jersey Turnpike officials complete a massive widening project stretching from South Jersey to New Brunswick, there will be plenty of additional elbow room for motorists. In fact, the now heavily used expressway might get downright lonely at times. The same could be true of a new Delaware River bridge near Trenton, as well as additional interchanges on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. While the region's engineers once predicted substantial increases in traffic in coming years - for the Jersey artery, projections called for southbound traffic to nearly double in less than three decades - real-time reports show volumes are flat or even falling.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ridership on buses, trains, and subways in 2013 was the highest in 57 years, the American Public Transportation Association said Monday. The growth in transit ridership continued a 20-year trend attributed to higher gasoline prices, a shift by young adults away from automobiles, increased use of mobile technology, and the increasing allure of urban areas. "There is a fundamental shift going on in the way we move about our communities," said APTA president Michael Melaniphy. In 2013, riders made 10.7 billion trips on U.S. public transit systems, up 1.1 percent from 2012.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal to have SEPTA or NJ Transit take over operations of the troubled PATCO commuter rail line won't win support from the New Jersey leadership of the bistate agency that runs PATCO. "That will never happen," said Jeffrey L. Nash, the Camden County freeholder who also is vice chairman of the Delaware River Port Authority, owner of PATCO. "PATCO is one of the most successful transit systems in the nation, with an extraordinary record of customer satisfaction," Nash said Tuesday.
SPORTS
February 6, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
The first Seahawks fan hadn't yet boarded NJ Transit for Secaucus on Sunday when Don Smolenski reminded everyone just how much Jeffrey Lurie and the Eagles want to host a Super Bowl. The Eagles president, Smolenski was on the phone a few days before Super Bowl XLVIII, making it clear that he and Lurie were keeping a close eye on how New York and New Jersey handled the run-up to the big game. That way, they'd be better prepared to make their bid for a Super Bowl in Philadelphia and at Lincoln Financial Field.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ron Katz has visited six of the last 13 Super Bowl host cities, traveling to the home stadiums for teams in Dallas, Detroit, Phoenix, Tampa Bay, San Diego and New Orleans - twice. He was excited to add New York and East Rutherford, N.J., to the list, but came away fatigued and disheartened. "They should never, ever have another Super Bowl here," said Katz, 50, of Denver. "The area is one of the most, if not the most, amazing places in the country, but based on the logistics that I saw - and the disregard for fan comfort and safety - never again.
SPORTS
February 4, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
YOU PROBABLY know about the best Super Bowl commercials so we decided to offer up the best tweets: * Mavericks owner Mark Cuban (@mcuban) wrote that he got off to a better start than either team: "I HAD SAFETY ON THE FIRST PLAY IN VEGAS !!!!!!!!!! 1mm to 1. $20mm BABY. #Unbelievable" * Speaking of rich guys, Microsoft's Bill Gates (@BillGates), a Seattle native, posted a geeky photo of himself dressed in a Seahawks cap and jersey along with the words: "Good luck to my hometown.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - By the time the fifth train from Secaucus rolled into MetLife Stadium with another thousand fans Sunday, both sides of this very Jersey Super Bowl were already defeated. By Secaucus. They slumped off the train silently, overheated, claustrophobic, transformed from upbeat football fans from out West into huddled masses of East Coast commuters, bitter and sarcastic about their long commute on NJ Transit. "Jersey sucks!" they had shouted in unison while stuck for 90 minutes in a Secaucus stairwell, some with only their Seattle Skittles to sustain them, dour demeanors in contrast to the bright sherbet colors of Bronco orange and Seahawk lime.
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