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NEWS
August 14, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NJ Transit and SEPTA will sell tickets to all of each other's stations, as part of a joint ticketing operation announced yesterday. Tickets to SEPTA and NJ Transit destinations are now available at NJ Transit vending machines, at rail ticket windows at the Trenton station, and at SEPTA ticket windows at Suburban and Market East stations. (SEPTA padlocked the last of its ticket-vending machines in January 2007, citing their inability to accept newly designed U.S. currency.) Fares will not be affected.
NEWS
October 28, 1997 | By Shannon Owens, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer staff writer Alan Sipress contributed to this article
An agreement was reached yesterday to keep NJ Transit commuter trains rolling in the event of a threatened Amtrak strike tomorrow. The deal, reached yesterday between NJ Transit, Amtrak and the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees, will allow NJ Transit to continue to operate commuter trains on the Northeast Corridor Line, the Raritan Valley Line and the North Jersey Coast Line. Without the agreement, 65,000 riders would have had to find alternate transportation. "This is a short-term plan," said Jeff Macklin, spokesman for the New Jersey Department of Transportation.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - NJ Transit on Monday revealed a newly designed ticket, part of an effort to combat the counterfeiting that officials say is costing the agency as much as $3 million a year. More than 200 people, a small percentage of them employees but mostly riders, were arrested for ticket fraud in the last 18 months, NJ Transit Police Chief Christopher Trucillo said. "These are not victimless crimes," Trucillo said. "These criminal acts financially penalize the hundreds of thousands of NJ Transit customers who lawfully utilize our system every weekday.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
NJ Transit's first rider survey since Hurricane Sandy shows improved customer satisfaction with the agency. The overall customer satisfaction rating in the survey released Tuesday was 6.4 out of 10. The figures were 6.0 just before the storm and 5.2 in 2011, when the commuter scorecard was first implemented. - AP  
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are several ways to increase ridership and revenue on the Atlantic City Rail Line, according to a study commissioned by NJ Transit, but the agency doesn't plan to do any of them. With NJ Transit strapped for money and Atlantic City losing casinos, visitors, and employees, the transit agency has shelved the recommendations of a study that was authorized in 2009 by the Corzine administration. "NJ Transit does not have any immediate plans to begin action on any of the proposals in the analysis," spokesman William J. Smith said in an e-mail.
NEWS
February 28, 2012
A train headed from Philadelphia to Atlantic City struck an unoccupied vehicle Tuesday evening in Berlin, N.J., an NJ Transit spokeswoman said. The accident occurred at the Washington Avenue crossing around 6:30 p.m., said Courtney Carroll. No one was injured on the train, which was carrying 130 passengers. A preliminary report said the car got stuck on the track and at least one occupant was able to get out before the train hit, Carroll said. The No. 4635 train left Philadelphia at 5:48 p.m. The passengers were to be transferred to buses.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit wants to boost bus and rail fares by an average of 9 percent, starting Oct. 1, and eliminate some routes beginning in September, the agency said Monday. The moves are designed to close a $60 million budget gap, the statewide transit agency said. Fares were last increased five years ago. Hearings will be held next month on the proposed fare hikes and service reductions, with a session scheduled in Camden on May 19. The agency's board is to vote on the increases July 8. If approved as proposed, the increases mean a one-way trip between Philadelphia and Gloucester City would cost $4.25, up from the current $3.90, while the monthly fare would be $134, up from the current $123.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | Inquirer photos by Gerald S. Williams
The emphasis was on safety yesterday as third and fourth graders at Camden's Cooper's Poynt Elementary School learned the do's and dont's of riding buses and trains from New Jersey Transit representatives. Students toured a bus, received coloring books and saw slides about public transportation.
NEWS
September 17, 2008 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An out-of-control NJ Transit truck plowed through two street lights, two trees and two garbage cans in a heavily trafficked area near Camden City Hall yesterday, but did not hit any pedestrians or other vehicles. Paramedics and city firefighters worked to extract a middle-aged NJ Transit driver from his vehicle, which came to a stop at the fence of a parking lot at Broadway and Market Street about 10 a.m. The man was alone in the vehicle and appeared to be conscious when he was put on a stretcher and taken to Cooper University Hospital.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | By Karen Weintraub, Special to The Inquirer United Press International contributed to this article
The Burlington County Human Services building in Westampton Township will not be cut off to public transportation as county officials had feared, the New Jersey Transit Board of Directors decided this week. Bus Route 458, which includes the Human Services building on Woodlane Road and Route 541, scheduled to be completed late next year, had been slated for elimination. Two other South Jersey bus routes were also saved by the transit board on Wednesday when it voted to approve fare increases on some bus and train routes in North Jersey.
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BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Northeast states and transit agencies - including SEPTA and NJ Transit - are being asked to pay more to maintain the heavily traveled rail corridor between Washington and Boston that they share with Amtrak. The new cost-sharing plan for the Northeast Corridor is due to take effect Oct. 1, although Massachusetts has objected. That state is upset about its higher bill and the prospect that the plan "may mark the beginning of a devolution of federal responsibility down to the states.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Key senators are reconsidering a plan to give railroads five more years to finish installing a mandated new safety system - signaling a potentially tougher stand to speed up work in the aftermath of the Amtrak Train 188 derailment in Philadelphia last month. "If we can figure out a way to get there sooner, we certainly want to be open to that," Sen. John Thune (R., S.D.), chairman of the Senate committee overseeing railroads, said after a hearing Wednesday. "If that entails something that doesn't require a blanket five-year extension, then we're open to that.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jamer Hunt typically commutes from Center City to a teaching job at the Parsons School for Design in New York City four days a week on a 7:28 or 8:30 a.m. Amtrak train. After Hunt, 50, learned Tuesday night about the derailment of Amtrak Train 188 at Frankford Junction, he tried to take a bus Wednesday morning, but tickets were sold out. On Wednesday, he worked from home via Skype on his computer to videoconference with a fellow teacher and class of 20 students. "I was up on the big screen, and talking with the students," said the director of the graduate design program at Parsons as he waited in line for an 8:15 a.m. Megabus on Thursday in University City.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
"Canceled" was the operative word at the Trenton Transit Center at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Amtrak to Harrisburg, CANCELED. Amtrak to Boston, CANCELED SEPTA to Philadelphia, CANCELED. Commuters at the Trenton station had their schedules disrupted by the suspension of service to and from Philadelphia, but were stoic about the inconvenience. John Di Paolo, 45, said he was sitting on a train at Newark Penn Station Tuesday night when service was canceled because of the derailment.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit wants to boost bus and rail fares by an average of 9 percent, starting Oct. 1, and eliminate some routes beginning in September, the agency said Monday. The moves are designed to close a $60 million budget gap, the statewide transit agency said. Fares were last increased five years ago. Hearings will be held next month on the proposed fare hikes and service reductions, with a session scheduled in Camden on May 19. The agency's board is to vote on the increases July 8. If approved as proposed, the increases mean a one-way trip between Philadelphia and Gloucester City would cost $4.25, up from the current $3.90, while the monthly fare would be $134, up from the current $123.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey's transit agency is considering a fare hike to fill a revenue shortfall, its director told lawmakers Thursday. NJ Transit officials said they expected to propose a fare increase by the end of April, in light of a $60 million gap in next year's operating budget. Testifying before the Senate Budget Committee, executive director Veronique Hakim did not specify how much the agency might raise fares. But given the size of its last fare increase in 2010 - which averaged 22 percent - "any proposal we put on the table would have to be substantially less than that to be palatable," Hakim said.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wetter. Warmer. Wilder. That long-term weather forecast for the Philadelphia region means trouble for SEPTA, especially on its railroad, subway, and trolley routes. A federal report released this month, which used SEPTA as a case study for the nation's transit systems, predicts that average temperatures in Philadelphia will rise by 3 to 6 degrees by 2050, with greater annual rainfall and more frequent "heavy precipitation events. " That means SEPTA can expect more flooding, sagging rail-power lines, mudslides, toppled trees, and washed-out rail beds.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA subways will remain open all night and Tuesday's Regional Rail service is still up in the air, as transit agencies respond to the impending snowstorm. NJTransit will halt service Monday evening. No trains or buses will depart after 8 p.m. No service will operate Tuesday. No trains will run Wednesday, although some bus and light rail service may resume then. SEPTA service was to be unaffected Monday, spokeswoman Jerri Williams said. SEPTA will post planned bus detours for Tuesday on its website by 8 p.m. Monday, she said.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PATCO stands to become a lot more Internet-user friendly by the summer. The commuter rail line announced Thursday that its operations and maintenance committee had endorsed a proposal from Comcast Corp. to provide Xfinity WiFi in all 13 stations in New Jersey and Philadelphia. The proposal will be considered by the Delaware River Port Authority board at its Jan. 21 meeting. If it is approved, Comcast projects, service will be available by summer. Xfinity WiFi is a network of hot spots that allows users to connect while conserving usage on their cellphone data plans.
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