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NEWS
May 15, 1992 | By Karen Auge, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
New Jersey Transit's recent announcement that it intends to locate a $37 million rail storage yard in Falls Township's Morrisville Yard came as unexpected good news to many in that struggling industrial community. Some Garden State lawmakers were surprised, too. And outraged. New Jersey Sen. Robert E. Littell (R., Sussex), whose fingers are on the state's purse strings, fired off a terse letter last week warning transit officials that they would not see a dime of public money next year unless they put their yard on the east side of the Delaware River.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | By Dwight Ott, S. Joseph Hagenmayer and Chris Conway, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer Dianna Marder also contributed to this article
Bowing to community pressure after a fatal train collision with a car, New Jersey Transit announced yesterday that it would reduce the speed of its new Atlantic City commuter trains to 60 m.p.h. along populated reaches of the rail line for the next six months. The decision came two days after a NJ Transit train struck a car that had maneuvered around a safety gate at a rail crossing in Berlin Borough, killing a woman and her 4-year-old daughter. NJ Transit officials said the speed of the trains would be reduced from 80 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An Egg Harbor City man stole a New Jersey Transit bus yesterday and drove it more than 100 miles, picking up and discharging passengers and collecting fares, before being stopped and arrested, police said. When David Middleton, 34, was apprehended, he told Hammonton police that he swiped the bus because he needed a ride home, authorities said. NJ Transit spokesman Steve Coleman said the trip began about 7 a.m. as more than 140 buses were being dispatched for the morning rush from the Orange City bus depot in Essex County.
NEWS
June 12, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ozone Day got you all choked up? Ask the boss for a ticket to ride. On days like yesterday, pollutants can combine with heat to increase ground-level ozone - also called smog. Adding to the poor atmospheric conditions is exhaust from automobiles. Enter NJ Transit, which is hoping to make breathing a bit easier by encouraging commuters to take mass transit instead of their cars. The agency offers companies $2 round-trip tickets that can be passed on to employees and used only when the ozone level is high enough to be unhealthful.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
The ACLU's New Jersey chapter is raising concerns about how NJ Transit monitors riders on its light-rail lines. The civil liberties group says the agency is infringing on passenger privacy by not only capturing video on board its trains, but recording audio. Another major concern, the ACLU says, is that NJ Transit has not disclosed what policies, if any, are in place to control who has access to the recordings, how they are used, how long they are kept, or how they are protected against unauthorized access.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit's latest proposals for fast bus service between South Jersey and Philadelphia envision trips along Routes 42 and 55 and the Atlantic City Expressway that could save motorists from five to 10 minutes in typical rush-hour traffic. But when traffic stalls because of accidents or bad weather, planners said, the buses could take advantage of dedicated lanes and stoplight overrides to keep moving when cars can't. "The biggest issue is reliability," said Gary Davies, a transportation consultant for NJ Transit.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit will get $2.6 million to move ahead with plans for a "bus rapid transit" route to link South Jersey and Philadelphia, and SEPTA will receive $5 million to upgrade its 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby, federal transportation officials said Monday. In addition, NJ Transit is getting $73 million to upgrade its statewide bus fleet, including new buses that run on compressed natural gas. The South Jersey rapid-bus system along Route 55, Route 42, and I-676 would allow rush-hour buses to travel on highway shoulder lanes and medians for part of the trip to Philadelphia and would provide 1,800 new parking spaces for commuters in Winslow and Deptford Townships.
NEWS
July 11, 1986 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passengers who ride New Jersey Transit buses in Camden got some new traveling companions this week - city police officers. Under a transit authority program that began this week, Camden police officers have begun boarding and inspecting buses in an effort to crack down on riders who break the law or disturb the peace on city buses. The authority hopes the program will lure more riders because they will feel safer. "We believe that everybody has the right to ride the buses in peace and comfort," said Tom Kelly, director of security for NJ Transit's southern division.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden Parking Authority, which donated $219,000 to the city in January despite predictions that the agency's expenses would outpace its revenue this year, could lose its most lucrative source of income by the fall. NJ Transit is reviewing the qualifications of companies to take over operation of downtown Camden's Walter Rand Transportation Terminal garage and the transit agency's other parking facilities in the state. The financially struggling Parking Authority, which has been without an executive director since Judy Fulton retired in December, has managed the 500-space garage since it opened in 1989.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | By Jeremy Kaplan, Special to The Inquirer
New Jersey Transit will expand its Atlantic City rail service next month, adding five weekday trains and changing current schedules to attract more riders, the agency announced yesterday. Starting April 1, the company will run 11 trains each way on the Lindenwold-to-Atlantic City route weekdays, up from eight trains to the shore and nine coming back, said spokesman Jeffrey Lamm. On weekends, the company is adding 18 trains - eight on Saturdays and 10 on Sundays. In residential areas, trains will continue to adhere to a 60 m.p.h.
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