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NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit's latest proposals for fast bus service between South Jersey and Philadelphia envision trips along Routes 42 and 55 and the Atlantic City Expressway that could save motorists from five to 10 minutes in typical rush-hour traffic. But when traffic stalls because of accidents or bad weather, planners said, the buses could take advantage of dedicated lanes and stoplight overrides to keep moving when cars can't. "The biggest issue is reliability," said Gary Davies, a transportation consultant for NJ Transit.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit will get $2.6 million to move ahead with plans for a "bus rapid transit" route to link South Jersey and Philadelphia, and SEPTA will receive $5 million to upgrade its 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby, federal transportation officials said Monday. In addition, NJ Transit is getting $73 million to upgrade its statewide bus fleet, including new buses that run on compressed natural gas. The South Jersey rapid-bus system along Route 55, Route 42, and I-676 would allow rush-hour buses to travel on highway shoulder lanes and medians for part of the trip to Philadelphia and would provide 1,800 new parking spaces for commuters in Winslow and Deptford Townships.
NEWS
July 11, 1986 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passengers who ride New Jersey Transit buses in Camden got some new traveling companions this week - city police officers. Under a transit authority program that began this week, Camden police officers have begun boarding and inspecting buses in an effort to crack down on riders who break the law or disturb the peace on city buses. The authority hopes the program will lure more riders because they will feel safer. "We believe that everybody has the right to ride the buses in peace and comfort," said Tom Kelly, director of security for NJ Transit's southern division.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden Parking Authority, which donated $219,000 to the city in January despite predictions that the agency's expenses would outpace its revenue this year, could lose its most lucrative source of income by the fall. NJ Transit is reviewing the qualifications of companies to take over operation of downtown Camden's Walter Rand Transportation Terminal garage and the transit agency's other parking facilities in the state. The financially struggling Parking Authority, which has been without an executive director since Judy Fulton retired in December, has managed the 500-space garage since it opened in 1989.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | By Jeremy Kaplan, Special to The Inquirer
New Jersey Transit will expand its Atlantic City rail service next month, adding five weekday trains and changing current schedules to attract more riders, the agency announced yesterday. Starting April 1, the company will run 11 trains each way on the Lindenwold-to-Atlantic City route weekdays, up from eight trains to the shore and nine coming back, said spokesman Jeffrey Lamm. On weekends, the company is adding 18 trains - eight on Saturdays and 10 on Sundays. In residential areas, trains will continue to adhere to a 60 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | By Alison Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just one month before the end of Amtrak service to Atlantic City, New Jersey Transit officials revealed that its rail service between Philadelphia and Atlantic City may also be in jeopardy. In a presentation to the NJ Transit's board of commissioners yesterday, Al Harf, assistant executive director of planning, called the South Jersey line a "loss leader" that will cost even more to operate after Amtrak pulls out. He put the increased cost to NJ Transit at $1.26 million per year, despite the extra revenue it will get from new passengers.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA subways will remain open all night and Tuesday's Regional Rail trains will run on a Saturday schedule, as transit agencies respond to the impending snowstorm. NJTransit will halt service Monday evening. No trains or buses will depart after 8 p.m. Service will resume "when conditions permit," NJTransit said. SEPTA service was unaffected Monday, spokeswoman Jerri Williams said. SEPTA will post planned bus detours for Tuesday on its website by 8 p.m. Monday, she said. Late night service will be suspended for buses that usually replace Broad Street and Market-Frankford subway service, as the two subway lines will remain open all night.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shouting, "They're shooting at me, they're going to kill me," a panic- stricken man battled his way on board a NJ Transit bus on Vine Street last night and rode to the Police Administration Building, where officers tackled him in the lobby. For six blocks, the man hung on the side and front of the bus, fighting with the driver to get in a window. He finally got aboard through the back door as frightened passengers ran out. "He was hanging on my mirror, coming through my window feet first," bus driver Cheryl Damico said.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
New Jersey Transit has moved a step closer to providing rail service between Atlantic City and Cherry Hill - and maybe on into Philadelphia. After four years of negotiations, the transit agency has bought a four-acre tract for a rail station next to Garden State Park, extending New Jersey Transit's Atlantic City line beyond its western terminus in Lindenwold. New Jersey Transit bought the tract for $1.1 million from International Thoroughbred Breeders, owner of Garden State Park, said agency spokesman Jeffrey Lamm.
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