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NEWS
July 11, 1986 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passengers who ride New Jersey Transit buses in Camden got some new traveling companions this week - city police officers. Under a transit authority program that began this week, Camden police officers have begun boarding and inspecting buses in an effort to crack down on riders who break the law or disturb the peace on city buses. The authority hopes the program will lure more riders because they will feel safer. "We believe that everybody has the right to ride the buses in peace and comfort," said Tom Kelly, director of security for NJ Transit's southern division.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | By Jeremy Kaplan, Special to The Inquirer
New Jersey Transit will expand its Atlantic City rail service next month, adding five weekday trains and changing current schedules to attract more riders, the agency announced yesterday. Starting April 1, the company will run 11 trains each way on the Lindenwold-to-Atlantic City route weekdays, up from eight trains to the shore and nine coming back, said spokesman Jeffrey Lamm. On weekends, the company is adding 18 trains - eight on Saturdays and 10 on Sundays. In residential areas, trains will continue to adhere to a 60 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | By Alison Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just one month before the end of Amtrak service to Atlantic City, New Jersey Transit officials revealed that its rail service between Philadelphia and Atlantic City may also be in jeopardy. In a presentation to the NJ Transit's board of commissioners yesterday, Al Harf, assistant executive director of planning, called the South Jersey line a "loss leader" that will cost even more to operate after Amtrak pulls out. He put the increased cost to NJ Transit at $1.26 million per year, despite the extra revenue it will get from new passengers.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shouting, "They're shooting at me, they're going to kill me," a panic- stricken man battled his way on board a NJ Transit bus on Vine Street last night and rode to the Police Administration Building, where officers tackled him in the lobby. For six blocks, the man hung on the side and front of the bus, fighting with the driver to get in a window. He finally got aboard through the back door as frightened passengers ran out. "He was hanging on my mirror, coming through my window feet first," bus driver Cheryl Damico said.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
New Jersey Transit has moved a step closer to providing rail service between Atlantic City and Cherry Hill - and maybe on into Philadelphia. After four years of negotiations, the transit agency has bought a four-acre tract for a rail station next to Garden State Park, extending New Jersey Transit's Atlantic City line beyond its western terminus in Lindenwold. New Jersey Transit bought the tract for $1.1 million from International Thoroughbred Breeders, owner of Garden State Park, said agency spokesman Jeffrey Lamm.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit trains and rail stations may soon be Internet hot spots where passengers can access e-mail, browse the Web, and stream video and audio. The transit agency said Wednesday it was seeking a company to provide wireless broadband, or WiFi, Internet service for its 12 rail lines and 165 train stations. Internet access is available on Amtrak's Acela trains and on many international trains, but it remains a rarity on U.S. transit systems. In issuing its request for proposals from WiFi providers, NJ Transit said it hoped to award a contract by the end of the year and have the system available to riders by next year.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Christie administration wants to eliminate free rides for NJ Transit employees. Making nonunion workers and retirees pay for their commutes and other trips could generate $1.6 million a year, NJ Transit spokeswoman Nancy Snyder said Monday. The proposal, which is expected to be approved by the NJT board Monday, would not affect the agency's union workers, whose free rides are part of their labor contracts. But contracts for all 28 NJT bargaining units have expired, Snyder said, and Gov. Christie has made it clear he wants free rides eliminated.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police in Camden are searching for three women who ignored a NJ Transit driver's requests to get off a bus late Tuesday. One of the women then assaulted the driver. The women, all described as between 18 and 22, had become unruly before the driver stopped near Broadway and Atlantic Avenue around 11 p.m. and asked them to leave, Camden police said Wednesday. The driver suffered a minor facial cut and was treated at Cooper University Hospital, a NJ Transit spokesman said. The women ran off, Camden police said.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit's nonunion workers and retirees won't get free rides after Jan. 1, following a vote by the agency's board on Monday to eliminate the benefit. The unanimous vote followed similar moves at other transportation agencies in New Jersey, which were pushed by Gov. Christie to do away with perks unavailable to the general public. Making 1,800 nonunion workers and 700 nonunion retirees pay for their commutes and other trips on NJ Transit buses and trains could generate $1.6 million a year, a spokeswoman said.
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