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NEWS
November 14, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time this year, a board appointed by the White House will seek to settle a dispute between NJ Transit and 12 railroad unions. The three-member emergency board appointed by President Obama starts work Friday and will receive within 30 days the final settlement offers from NJ Transit and the 12 unions involved in the contract dispute. Thirty days after that the board will issue a recommended settlement to the president. The unions, representing more than 4,000 NJ Transit workers, began negotiations for a new contract in July 2011.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - Congress gave the nation's railroads three more years - and possibly up to five - to install a mandated safety system that would automatically slow trains running at unsafe speeds, and which safety experts say could have prevented May's deadly Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia. Called positive train control, the system was supposed to be installed on major passenger and freight lines by the end of this year, but no freight lines and only a handful of commuter railroads expected to meet that target.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Key House lawmakers proposed giving rail lines at least three more years to install a critical rail safety system that could have prevented May's Amtrak derailment, bowing Wednesday to the reality that almost no railroads will meet the requirement to have the system in place by year's end. The bill, sponsored by the top Republicans and Democrats on the House transportation committee, would give major freight and commuter rail lines until...
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid timeless traditions such as Communion wafers, incense, and rosary beads, Philadelphia's papal pilgrims, trying to get around Center City, will get up-to-the-minute transit information via fiber optics and cellphone signals. The area's transit agencies and a bicycle coalition say they are turning to technology in an unprecedented way to direct crowds to their destinations during Pope Francis' visit this weekend. People will be able to get real-time information about conditions on rail lines, biking trails, and roads in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of SEPTA papal transit passes sold for Regional Rail passengers is likely to be far fewer than the 328,000 available, but that doesn't mean suburban train stations won't be jammed Saturday and Sunday. On average, the 18 Regional Rail stations that will operate this weekend will have about four times the typical number of weekday passengers on Saturday and Sunday, as the expected throng rides downtown in hopes of seeing Pope Francis. "On Saturday and Sunday, on those two days, it's not going to be the usual station," SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Williams said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Over the years, New Jersey officials have come up with one scheme after another to revive Camden, the state's poorest city. First, there was the entertainment zone along the Delaware waterfront. Now, there is the Gateway District off Admiral Wilson Boulevard, near Campbell Soup. All have involved oodles of tax breaks, acres of surface parking, and relatively few jobs for the long-suffering residents of Camden. Subaru of America is the latest beneficiary of the state's generosity, and it appears to be following the same script in the name of bolstering Camden's anorexic economy.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | BY MAYOR MICHAEL NUTTER
DEAR DAILY NEWS and my fellow Philadelphians, I write to provide clarity, facts and important information on the biggest event to take place in our lifetime in our great city. My goal is to address some thoughts and statements written to me by Mr. Will Bunch in an opinion piece yesterday. What follows are recaps of Bunch's claims and my response. Bunch: You're not a security expert . . . You're a leader. Your job is to coordinate security, and communicate with the public, with the average schlub like me. You are right; like you, I'm not a security expert, but, as mayor for the last 7 1/2 years, I have overseen an experienced team of managers and experts, and planned and hosted many large events.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Rail-line operators could have until 2018 to install an upgraded safety system under a transportation bill introduced Thursday, less time than in a measure that advanced earlier this year. The new proposal, scheduled for a committee vote Wednesday, represents a shift by those pushing to give rail lines more time to install a system that was supposed to be in place by the end of this year. Some lawmakers wanted to give rail lines five years - until 2020 - to meet the mandate, but the new plan shortens the potential extension and requires rail lines to hit milestones along the way. Some top Democrats say it still represents too much delay, casting doubt on the bill's fate.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Northeast states and transit agencies - including SEPTA and NJ Transit - are being asked to pay more to maintain the heavily traveled rail corridor between Washington and Boston that they share with Amtrak. The new cost-sharing plan for the Northeast Corridor is due to take effect Oct. 1, although Massachusetts has objected. That state is upset about its higher bill and the prospect that the plan "may mark the beginning of a devolution of federal responsibility down to the states.
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