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NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passenger trains could be running again between Camden and Glassboro by 2019, if someone comes up with $1.6 billion and the current construction schedule doesn't slip. Those are big ifs. South Jersey residents got an update Monday evening on the latest plans for a long-discussed 18-mile light-rail line that would restore passenger service to a corridor now used only for freight trains. At a show-and-tell session at Woodbury High School, about 100 area residents talked to officials of STV Inc., the engineering firm conducting an $8.1 million environmental-impact study for the Delaware River Port Authority.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA supports nearly 26,000 jobs, contributes $3.21 billion in economic output, and generates $62.5 million in state tax revenue, according to a study released Monday. The study, commissioned by SEPTA, comes as the financially strapped transit authority seeks a fare increase and lobbies state officials for more funding. SEPTA provides more bang for the buck than other transit agencies in Pennsylvania and gets less than its share of state funding based on ridership, the study found.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
NJ Transit's first rider survey since Hurricane Sandy shows improved customer satisfaction with the agency. The overall customer satisfaction rating in the survey released Tuesday was 6.4 out of 10. The figures were 6.0 just before the storm and 5.2 in 2011, when the commuter scorecard was first implemented. - AP  
NEWS
April 10, 2013
DESPITE its program of informational "safety blitzes" at stations where rail trespassing is frequent, SEPTA rail deaths are up so far this year from six in the first quarter of 2012 to eight in 2013. Overall, they have climbed from 10 (two confirmed suicides) in 2010 to 14 (six suicides) in 2011 to 15 (two suicides) in 2012. New Jersey Transit, on the other hand, has seen a dramatic decline in accidental rail deaths, from 14 in 2010 to nine in 2011 to one in 2012 and one so far in 2013.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - Top New Jersey transportation officials on Wednesday recounted a challenging fiscal year to Senate lawmakers, tallying more than $2 billion in Hurricane Sandy-related expenses, seeing the state's snow-removal budget busted by frequent winter storms, and continuing to rely on borrowing to fund road and bridge repairs. But rail and bus riders will be spared fare increases for the fourth straight year, they said. Transportation Commissioner Jim Simpson and executives at NJ Transit and the Motor Vehicle Commission appeared before the Senate Budget Committee, as the panel began its review of Gov. Christie's proposed $32.9 billion budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. Lawmakers must act on the proposal before the current fiscal year ends.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
NJ Transit and PATH are among four agencies devastated by Hurricane Sandy that will share in more than $1 billion in new federal disaster aid that Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced Friday. NJ Transit, PATH, New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and the New York City Department of Transportation will get the bulk of the $1.4 billion. NJ Transit will receive $86 million to cover repairs, as well as the cost of providing bus and ferry service. The agency has received $231 million to date.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Back in 2010, Gov. Christie shocked transportation experts when he canceled construction of a new rail tunnel to Manhattan, one of the nation's busiest routes. The project would have doubled capacity, relieving the terrible rush-hour delays that force NJ Transit and Amtrak trains to queue up to snake through two century-old, single-track tunnels. But Christie argued that the state couldn't afford its part of the tab, $3 billion to $5 billion, for relieving the rail congestion. Price wasn't an issue earlier this month when South Jersey officials boisterously celebrated the start of another project aimed at reducing congestion.
NEWS
March 27, 2013
Consider the unappreciated trash truck that ambles along the streets of the city day after day. It probably can't get any uglier, but it may get a little flashier under City Council President Darrell L. Clarke's creative plan to turn city property into revenue by selling advertising space. Other cities and local transit agencies have used public property, including garbage trucks and other vehicles, to drum up advertising revenue. SEPTA is expected to make about $14 million this year from advertising for Tropicana orange juice, Baileys Irish Cream, Honda, AT&T, and others.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Mount Ephraim man with a suspended license was arrested Monday in the hit-and-run death of a 67-year-old woman as she crossed the Black Horse Pike in Haddon Township with a shopping cart Sunday evening. Timothy Polijczuk, 50, owner of a crab stand in Camden, was charged with leaving the scene of a fatal accident, causing death while driving with a suspended license, and operating a vehicle with a suspended license. As he was being taken from the Haddon Township police station for processing in Camden, he told an NBC10 reporter that he did not know he had struck someone.
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