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BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak is seeking redevelopment plans for 30th Street Station and the surrounding area, including the potentially lucrative air rights above the rail yards adjacent to the station. After several years of preparation, Amtrak announced Monday that it wants proposals for a master development plan delivered by Nov. 18. Amtrak is working with Drexel University and Brandywine Realty Trust to redevelop the 80-year-old station and its University City neighborhood. A coordinating committee of significant players, such as the University of Pennsylvania, SEPTA, and the city, also will be involved, Amtrak said.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
In December 2009, NJ Transit announced four major advancements in transportation for South Jersey, with an initial cost of $13.5 million. Nearly four years later, none of the projects has moved beyond the study phase:   Planners have spent the four years and $735,000 studying how to improve rail service on the Atlantic City Line, with nothing to show for their efforts yet. By contrast, it took only 90 days to build the Philadelphia &...
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013
In the Region   WiFi to ride N.J. Transit   New Jersey Transit 's board approved a proposal that will give rail travelers wireless Internet access in stations, on platforms, and on board trains by the end of 2016. The contract with Cablevision Systems Corp. is for 20 years and will not cost NJ Transit anything. Cablevision will install fiber optic cabling, wireless access points, antennas, and related equipment in stations, along the right-of-way, and on vehicles, the agency said in a news release.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Transit agencies and other entities will be looking to hire military veterans and their spouses at a Philadelphia job fair Tuesday. SEPTA assistant conductor Jordan Ranalli, an Army and Marine Corps veteran who hopes to become a locomotive engineer, said veterans make good hires for transit authorities. "You know pretty much what you're going to get . . . someone who's had intense training and has thick skin, who is trainable and teachable and able to rise to management," said Ranalli, 31, of Wilmington.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passenger trains could be running again between Camden and Glassboro by 2019, if someone comes up with $1.6 billion and the current construction schedule doesn't slip. Those are big ifs. South Jersey residents got an update Monday evening on the latest plans for a long-discussed 18-mile light-rail line that would restore passenger service to a corridor now used only for freight trains. At a show-and-tell session at Woodbury High School, about 100 area residents talked to officials of STV Inc., the engineering firm conducting an $8.1 million environmental-impact study for the Delaware River Port Authority.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA supports nearly 26,000 jobs, contributes $3.21 billion in economic output, and generates $62.5 million in state tax revenue, according to a study released Monday. The study, commissioned by SEPTA, comes as the financially strapped transit authority seeks a fare increase and lobbies state officials for more funding. SEPTA provides more bang for the buck than other transit agencies in Pennsylvania and gets less than its share of state funding based on ridership, the study found.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
NJ Transit's first rider survey since Hurricane Sandy shows improved customer satisfaction with the agency. The overall customer satisfaction rating in the survey released Tuesday was 6.4 out of 10. The figures were 6.0 just before the storm and 5.2 in 2011, when the commuter scorecard was first implemented. - AP  
NEWS
April 10, 2013
DESPITE its program of informational "safety blitzes" at stations where rail trespassing is frequent, SEPTA rail deaths are up so far this year from six in the first quarter of 2012 to eight in 2013. Overall, they have climbed from 10 (two confirmed suicides) in 2010 to 14 (six suicides) in 2011 to 15 (two suicides) in 2012. New Jersey Transit, on the other hand, has seen a dramatic decline in accidental rail deaths, from 14 in 2010 to nine in 2011 to one in 2012 and one so far in 2013.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - Top New Jersey transportation officials on Wednesday recounted a challenging fiscal year to Senate lawmakers, tallying more than $2 billion in Hurricane Sandy-related expenses, seeing the state's snow-removal budget busted by frequent winter storms, and continuing to rely on borrowing to fund road and bridge repairs. But rail and bus riders will be spared fare increases for the fourth straight year, they said. Transportation Commissioner Jim Simpson and executives at NJ Transit and the Motor Vehicle Commission appeared before the Senate Budget Committee, as the panel began its review of Gov. Christie's proposed $32.9 billion budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. Lawmakers must act on the proposal before the current fiscal year ends.
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