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NEWS
January 10, 1995 | By Michael Raphael, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This is an odd bus. There's the familiar oversized black steering wheel, of course, and all the lights and buttons and gizmos you'd expect to find on an NJ Transit bus. When you press the starter button, the engine fills the air with a roaring rumble. And when you push down the gas pedal and look out the windshield and the side windows and the big side-view mirrors, people and trees and buildings roll by. But this bus ain't movin'. You're getting nowhere fast. This could be the future of bus-driver training.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Christie administration wants to eliminate free rides for NJ Transit employees. Making nonunion workers and retirees pay for their commutes and other trips could generate $1.6 million a year, NJ Transit spokeswoman Nancy Snyder said Monday. The proposal, which is expected to be approved by the NJT board Monday, would not affect the agency's union workers, whose free rides are part of their labor contracts. But contracts for all 28 NJT bargaining units have expired, Snyder said, and Gov. Christie has made it clear he wants free rides eliminated.
NEWS
April 10, 2013
DESPITE its program of informational "safety blitzes" at stations where rail trespassing is frequent, SEPTA rail deaths are up so far this year from six in the first quarter of 2012 to eight in 2013. Overall, they have climbed from 10 (two confirmed suicides) in 2010 to 14 (six suicides) in 2011 to 15 (two suicides) in 2012. New Jersey Transit, on the other hand, has seen a dramatic decline in accidental rail deaths, from 14 in 2010 to nine in 2011 to one in 2012 and one so far in 2013.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY Train service on the Atlantic City Line should be increased to one train an hour, and a station near the Atlantic City airport would boost ridership, a study for NJ Transit says. The cost of operating 20 round-trips daily between Atlantic City and Philadelphia was estimated at $29.4 million a year, with passenger fares expected to cover 38 percent of the cost. Currently, there are 12 trains in each direction daily, with passengers required to wait as long as 21/2 hours between trains at midday.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A Republican plan to cut $34.5 million from the New Jersey Transit subsidy "is a very bad idea which appears to be based on a misunderstanding of the facts," a longtime member of the transit authority's board said yesterday. "We on the board have looked very hard at this budget. . . . You can't cut it further without causing pain to people who are riding buses and trains," said John L. McGoldrick, who has served on the seven-member transit board since the agency was created in 1979.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | By Bob Tulini and Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Representatives of New Jersey Transit (NJT), one of the operators for the Gamblers Express rail line being built from Philadelphia to Atlantic City, met with officials and residents of Camden County yesterday and pledged that they are trying to satisfy their concerns. But many residents said they remained unsatisfied and voiced some new concerns about the rail line being built through their communities. At a meeting last night in Westmont called by local mayors to provide an update on the project, residents and officials voiced concerns about such issues as safety and noise from the diesel trains that are to operate on the line, common concerns which many of them have expressed since the line was proposed several years ago. Z. Wayne Johnson, NJT's director of community relations, said that in response to local requests, 21.2 miles of fences will be added to the 14.2 miles of fences being erected along the rail line.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | BY NEIL SCHEININ
Carless since late 1980, when my Volkswagen Beetle self-destructed on the New Jersey Turnpike, I have come to rely upon the rails for transportation between Philadelphia and New York City. I'm delighted to leave the driving to the engineers. The round trip, which I make frequently to visit family, had become wearying - too much traffic; too many trucks roaring like Godzilla; too many nights heading south, impatiently counting the miles until Turnpike Exit 4 finally appeared. How much more pleasant to stretch out, newspaper and coffee in hand, and be able to catnap.
NEWS
August 23, 2007
By Bruce S. Ticker The smooth and pleasant light-rail ride is, hands down, the cheapest form of transportation linking Camden to Trenton, yet its crazy-making fare-enforcement system bears all the earmarks of a process manufactured to generate revenue. River Line riders must pass through hoops to buy a ticket, pay excessive fines if charged with a fare-evasion offense, and confront obstacles to contest prosecution. Possibly one charge violates our civil rights. I ride the River Line periodically to connect with the Manhattan-bound NJ Transit commuter train.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are several ways to increase ridership and revenue on the Atlantic City Rail Line, according to a study commissioned by NJ Transit, but the agency doesn't plan to do any of them. With NJ Transit strapped for money and Atlantic City losing casinos, visitors, and employees, the transit agency has shelved the recommendations of a study that was authorized in 2009 by the Corzine administration. "NJ Transit does not have any immediate plans to begin action on any of the proposals in the analysis," spokesman William J. Smith said in an e-mail.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
With assaults on bus drivers increasing, many transit agencies are installing shields to protect drivers from their customers. NJ Transit has put shields in 10 buses and is adding 55 in a pilot project to see if they work well enough to be installed across the fleet. Shields also have been installed or are being tested by agencies in New York City; Chicago; Washington; Rochester, N.Y.; Seattle; and other cities. In the Philadelphia area, SEPTA officials and leaders of the drivers' union are skeptical that the shields provide enough protection to offset operators' concerns about comfort and the ability to get out quickly in an emergency.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are several ways to increase ridership and revenue on the Atlantic City Rail Line, according to a study commissioned by NJ Transit, but the agency doesn't plan to do any of them. With NJ Transit strapped for money and Atlantic City losing casinos, visitors, and employees, the transit agency has shelved the recommendations of a study that was authorized in 2009 by the Corzine administration. "NJ Transit does not have any immediate plans to begin action on any of the proposals in the analysis," spokesman William J. Smith said in an e-mail.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY Train service on the Atlantic City Line should be increased to one train an hour, and a station near the Atlantic City airport would boost ridership, a study for NJ Transit says. The cost of operating 20 round-trips daily between Atlantic City and Philadelphia was estimated at $29.4 million a year, with passenger fares expected to cover 38 percent of the cost. Currently, there are 12 trains in each direction daily, with passengers required to wait as long as 21/2 hours between trains at midday.
NEWS
April 10, 2013
DESPITE its program of informational "safety blitzes" at stations where rail trespassing is frequent, SEPTA rail deaths are up so far this year from six in the first quarter of 2012 to eight in 2013. Overall, they have climbed from 10 (two confirmed suicides) in 2010 to 14 (six suicides) in 2011 to 15 (two suicides) in 2012. New Jersey Transit, on the other hand, has seen a dramatic decline in accidental rail deaths, from 14 in 2010 to nine in 2011 to one in 2012 and one so far in 2013.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Christie administration wants to eliminate free rides for NJ Transit employees. Making nonunion workers and retirees pay for their commutes and other trips could generate $1.6 million a year, NJ Transit spokeswoman Nancy Snyder said Monday. The proposal, which is expected to be approved by the NJT board Monday, would not affect the agency's union workers, whose free rides are part of their labor contracts. But contracts for all 28 NJT bargaining units have expired, Snyder said, and Gov. Christie has made it clear he wants free rides eliminated.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
With assaults on bus drivers increasing, many transit agencies are installing shields to protect drivers from their customers. NJ Transit has put shields in 10 buses and is adding 55 in a pilot project to see if they work well enough to be installed across the fleet. Shields also have been installed or are being tested by agencies in New York City; Chicago; Washington; Rochester, N.Y.; Seattle; and other cities. In the Philadelphia area, SEPTA officials and leaders of the drivers' union are skeptical that the shields provide enough protection to offset operators' concerns about comfort and the ability to get out quickly in an emergency.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Two cars of a commuter train derailed as they headed under the Hudson River in New York yesterday, briefly stranding hundreds of passengers and snarling rail traffic throughout the Northeast for the rest of the day and into the evening rush hour. The accident forced authorities to close one of the two rail tunnels used by Amtrak and New Jersey Transit trains between Manhattan and New Jersey. Both inbound and outbound trains were sharing the remaining tunnel, said Cliff Cole, an Amtrak spokesman.
NEWS
August 23, 2007
By Bruce S. Ticker The smooth and pleasant light-rail ride is, hands down, the cheapest form of transportation linking Camden to Trenton, yet its crazy-making fare-enforcement system bears all the earmarks of a process manufactured to generate revenue. River Line riders must pass through hoops to buy a ticket, pay excessive fines if charged with a fare-evasion offense, and confront obstacles to contest prosecution. Possibly one charge violates our civil rights. I ride the River Line periodically to connect with the Manhattan-bound NJ Transit commuter train.
NEWS
April 29, 2007 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Sarles, the new executive director of NJ Transit, brings two valuable credentials to work each day. As a longtime transit manager, including five years with NJT, Sarles understands the financial, engineering and political issues that drive - or derail - mass transit. And he's a veteran transit commuter; as a Philadelphia resident who works in Newark and Trenton, he gets to buy what he sells. For most of the last 40 years, he has been a regular rail rider, with first-hand exposure to the delights and travails of public transit.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A new group of area business leaders is vowing to counter what it calls the "faulty information and unwarranted fears" spread by opponents of a proposed $450 million light-rail passenger line between Camden and Trenton. The Pro-Rail Business Alliance has more than a dozen members, including the Burlington County Chamber of Commerce, the Delaware River Port Authority, Rancocas Hospital, the Riverside Business Association, and the Palmyra Business and Community Alliance. During the new group's first news conference yesterday afternoon, Millie Gama, the chamber's executive director, said the rail line "packs a powerful economic punch which can benefit every community.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | By Michael Raphael, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This is an odd bus. There's the familiar oversized black steering wheel, of course, and all the lights and buttons and gizmos you'd expect to find on an NJ Transit bus. When you press the starter button, the engine fills the air with a roaring rumble. And when you push down the gas pedal and look out the windshield and the side windows and the big side-view mirrors, people and trees and buildings roll by. But this bus ain't movin'. You're getting nowhere fast. This could be the future of bus-driver training.
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