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NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Anthony R. Wood, STAFF WRITER
Already off to a precocious start, the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season is likely to be friskier - and perhaps more destructive and costly - than those of some recent years, according to government forecasters. They also are offering, however, a potential silver lining for coastal residents, who own about $10 trillion worth of property, and U.S. taxpayers. Global warming aside, the Atlantic Basin might be undergoing a benign sea change that could mean generally less-active seasons for perhaps the next 20 years or more.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
One day after coasting to reelection, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah faced deepening legal problems with the guilty plea of a second member of his inner circle. Political consultant Thomas Lindenfeld, 59, of Washington, pleaded Wednesday to a count of wire fraud for taking part in schemes that prosecutors say Fattah engineered to siphon off federal money to finance his losing bid for Philadelphia mayor in 2007. Assistant U.S. Attorney Eric Gibson said the government would seek a more lenient sentence for Lindenfeld because he was cooperating.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a pool of more than $75 million in federal appropriations for fisheries disaster relief from Hurricane Sandy and other storm damage, at only $1.5 million, New Jersey has received a pittance compared with other regions, according to state legislators and anglers associations. Marine industry losses in both commercial and recreational fishing because of Sandy have been estimated at $121 million in New Jersey and $77 million in New York state. The two states have been told to split $3 million being allocated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service for the recovery, officials said.
NEWS
May 17, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a premature hot spell, Philadelphia was quite warm in April - and so was Planet Earth in general. Worldwide, it was the warmest April on record, according to data published today by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Based on microwave satellite data, released last week, it was the second-warmest April. NOAA computed a worldwide temperature of 58.1 degrees Fahrenheit, or 1.37 degrees above the 130-year average. That beat the old record, set in 1998, by 0.09 degrees.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Punxsutawney Phil, Pennsylvania's famous winter-predicting groundhog who will look for his shadow tomorrow, is a quack, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration charges. Phil has failed in nine of his last 13 annual predictions that Americans would, or would not, endure six more weeks of winter, the nation's weather service reported this week on its Web site (www.noaa.gov) in what it lightheartedly called a "reality check. " After a close comparison of the groundhog's predictions and average national temperatures at the agency's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., NOAA meteorologist Tom Ross reached this conclusion about Phil's prediction skill: "It's hit or miss.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Usually they post warnings of floods, tornados and assorted mayhem, but now government meteorologists are issuing warnings of another kind. They say that the White House's proposed cuts to the National Weather Service budget and the plans to implement them are dangerous. "We're putting people's lives at risk," said David A. Solano, a hydrologist a the Middle Atlantic River Forecast Center, which monitors flood threats in a five-state region that includes Philadelphia. At the center of the dispute is a plan to remove the Information Technology Officers (ITOs)
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Usually they post warnings of floods, tornados and assorted mayhem, but now government meteorologists are issuing warnings of another kind. They say that the White House's proposed cuts to the National Weather Service budget and the plans to implement them are dangerous. 'We're putting people's lives at risk," said David A. Solano, a hydrologist at the Middle Atlantic River Forecast Center in State College, which monitors flood threats in seven states, including Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials are asking vessels operating near the mouth of the Delaware Bay to travel at a reduced speed of less than 10 knots or to skirt the area to protect an aggregation of five highly endangered right whales. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Fisheries Service said the whales were spotted in the area Thursday. The voluntary speed restriction advisory remains in effect until Feb. 22, the service said. According to the NOAA, only about 300 North Atlantic right whales remain, making them one of the most endangered cetacean species.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
In 1968, William E. Evans was one of a team of marine scientists trailing dolphins in the Pacific Ocean to study their behavior. After 10 days of recording the dolphins' movements every 15 minutes, "we were stuck with a room full of paper" on which the data had been recorded, said Evans, undersecretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Even when computers became the customary tool for storing information, marine scientists discovered that the sheer volume of the material made it unwieldy.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like the trees, blossoms, and strawberries, the tropical storm season got off to an early start this year. In the end, however, the premature arrival of Alberto may be about as meaningful to the rest of the season as the snows of Halloween were to winter, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which released its annual hurricane outlook for the Atlantic Basin during a teleconference this morning. Concurring with outlooks released earlier by William Gray and Philip Klotzbach, at Colorado State University; Accu-Weather Inc., and WSI Corp., NOAA sees a near normal season in the basin, which includes the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico.
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NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Anthony R. Wood, STAFF WRITER
Already off to a precocious start, the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season is likely to be friskier - and perhaps more destructive and costly - than those of some recent years, according to government forecasters. They also are offering, however, a potential silver lining for coastal residents, who own about $10 trillion worth of property, and U.S. taxpayers. Global warming aside, the Atlantic Basin might be undergoing a benign sea change that could mean generally less-active seasons for perhaps the next 20 years or more.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
One day after coasting to reelection, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah faced deepening legal problems with the guilty plea of a second member of his inner circle. Political consultant Thomas Lindenfeld, 59, of Washington, pleaded Wednesday to a count of wire fraud for taking part in schemes that prosecutors say Fattah engineered to siphon off federal money to finance his losing bid for Philadelphia mayor in 2007. Assistant U.S. Attorney Eric Gibson said the government would seek a more lenient sentence for Lindenfeld because he was cooperating.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In their last desperate moments, with winds howling and waves crashing around them, crew members rushed below decks and frantically pushed blankets and bedding into the leaking hull. They hoped to keep the steamer Robert J. Walker afloat long enough to make land near Absecon Inlet Light, but were overwhelmed by the rushing waters of the Atlantic in 1860. More than a century and a half later, the Walker is still pointed toward the lighthouse and the blue wool blankets the crew used are still lying in the bow, in a murky, emerald green world 85 feet down.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a pool of more than $75 million in federal appropriations for fisheries disaster relief from Hurricane Sandy and other storm damage, at only $1.5 million, New Jersey has received a pittance compared with other regions, according to state legislators and anglers associations. Marine industry losses in both commercial and recreational fishing because of Sandy have been estimated at $121 million in New Jersey and $77 million in New York state. The two states have been told to split $3 million being allocated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service for the recovery, officials said.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to the digital age, one of the traditions of the high seas - those beautifully lithographed nautical charts of U.S. coastal waters - will end in April. The charts have existed since 1862. But going the way of gigantic paper fold-up road maps that motorists used before GPS, the 4-by-3-foot nautical charts printed by the U.S. government will no longer be available when stocks of them eventually run out, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Mariners will instead have to use electronic charting systems or print-on-demand versions of the maps, according to NOAA's Office of Coastal Survey.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials are asking vessels operating near the mouth of the Delaware Bay to travel at a reduced speed of less than 10 knots or to skirt the area to protect an aggregation of five highly endangered right whales. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Fisheries Service said the whales were spotted in the area Thursday. The voluntary speed restriction advisory remains in effect until Feb. 22, the service said. According to the NOAA, only about 300 North Atlantic right whales remain, making them one of the most endangered cetacean species.
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials are asking vessels operating near the mouth of Delaware Bay to travel at a reduced speed of 10 knots or less to protect an aggregation of five highly endangered right whales spotted in the area. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Fisheries Service said the whales were spotted Thursday. The voluntary speed restriction advisory remains in effect until Feb. 22, the service said. The coordinates for the so called Dynamic Management Area are 39 38N to 38 55N and from 074 21W to 073 27W. According to NOAA, only about 300 North Atlantic right whales remain, making them one of the most endangered cetaceans in the world.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like the trees, blossoms, and strawberries, the tropical storm season got off to an early start this year. In the end, however, the premature arrival of Alberto may be about as meaningful to the rest of the season as the snows of Halloween were to winter, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which released its annual hurricane outlook for the Atlantic Basin during a teleconference this morning. Concurring with outlooks released earlier by William Gray and Philip Klotzbach, at Colorado State University; Accu-Weather Inc., and WSI Corp., NOAA sees a near normal season in the basin, which includes the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A bill that could save a Sandy Hook ocean laboratory from closing was approved Thursday by the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee. But the James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory is not out of danger. Congress is unlikely to address a final budget until after the November election. "We've taken an important step to keep the doors of the Howard lab open and its successful research operation up and running," said Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.). Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.)
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