CollectionsNobel Peace Prize
IN THE NEWS

Nobel Peace Prize

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 15, 2012
Last year's awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize was a rarity, as it was divided among three women: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Leymah Gbowee of Liberia, and Tawakkol Karman of Yemen. Match up previous female winners of the award, which was first presented in 1901, with the year they were honored. 1. Jane Addams. 2. Emily Greene Balch. 3. Mairead Corrigan and Betty Williams. 4. Shirin Ebadi. 5. Wangari Maathai. 6. Rigoberta Menchu. 7. Alva Myrdal.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Karl Ritter and Bjoern H. Amland, Associated Press
OSLO, Norway - Leymah Gbowee confronted armed forces in Liberia to demand that they stop using rape as a weapon. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf became Africa's first woman to win a free presidential election. And Tawakkul Karman began pushing for change in Yemen long before the Arab Spring. They share a commitment to women's rights in regions where oppression is common, and on Friday, they shared the Nobel Peace Prize. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored women for the first time in seven years, and in selecting Karman, it also recognized the Arab Spring movement championed by millions of often anonymous activists from Tunisia to Syria.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | They Say: A History of the Nobel Peace Prize Jay Nordlinger?is a senior editor of National Review and the author of the just-released "Peace
Jay Nordlinger?is a senior editor of National Review and the author of the just-released "Peace, They Say: A History of the Nobel Peace Prize, the Most Famous and Controversial Prize in the World" (Encounter Books) The story of the Nobel Peace Prize is a long one, beginning in 1901. It is also an interesting one, boasting a huge, diverse cast of characters. In 1947, it becomes a bit of a Philadelphia story. The prize was shared that year by two Quaker relief organizations: the Friends Service Council in London and the American Friends Service Committee in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Ghana's leader wins reelection ACCRA, Ghana - The head of Ghana's election commission has announced that President John Dramani Mahama won the presidential election with 50.7 percent of the vote. Election commission chairman Kwadwo Afari-Gyan said Sunday that opposition leader Nana Akufo-Addo came in second with 47.74 percent of the vote, according to provisional results from Friday's election. Armored tanks surrounded Ghana's electoral commission and police barricaded the road around the electoral offices as the results were announced.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Christopher Torchia, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Nelson Mandela was in serious but stable condition in a Pretoria hospital for the third day Monday with a recurring lung infection, and a foundation led by retired archbishop Desmond Tutu described the 94-year-old anti-apartheid hero as an "extraordinary gift" to South Africa. As family members visited South Africa's first black president in the hospital, the government announced - in only the second communication on Mandela since he was hospitalized on Saturday - that his condition was "unchanged.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Tia Goldenberg, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israeli and global leaders, local celebrities, and Hollywood superstars celebrated under one roof Tuesday to mark Israeli President Shimon Peres' 90th birthday, reflecting world respect for one of the country's peace pioneers. Peres is hosting his annual Presidential Conference, which brings together artists, thinkers, and leaders to discuss issues relevant to Israel and the world. Instrumental in building Israel's military in the first days of the state six decades ago, he served twice as prime minister and promoted peace between Israel and the Palestinians, sometimes ahead of his own people.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Mother Teresa, the frail Roman Catholic nun who won a Nobel Peace Prize for her work among the sick and dying of Calcutta, said yesterday that she was stepping down as head of the religious order she founded in 1950. "I have been leading the Missionaries of Charity for 40 years," Mother Teresa, 79, said with a smile as she bustled about her home and office near the Calcutta slum where she started her work. "I resigned in the interests of my organization, which needs to be run efficiently," she said.
NEWS
October 20, 2014
ISSUE | E-MAIL PORN Unbecoming clicks State Supreme Court Justice Seamus P. McCaffery can apologize until the cows come home for his avowed lapse in judgment ("Swift justice," Oct. 17). He can offer a multitude of excuses and cry foul all he wants. But passing off his actions as a direct result of his experience as a member of the Police Department, well, that's stooping pretty low. He went from being everyone's hero to being a disgrace. |Dan Dufner, Southampton Gone justice?
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Nobel committee finally got the Peace Prize right in 2014. After blowing the chance to choose Malala Yousafzai last year - as a brave and inspiring champion of girls' education worldwide - the committee finally tapped her, along with Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian campaigner against child labor. These choices couldn't have come at a better time. At a moment when the global news is nonstop negative and ugly, these heroes stand for something uplifting and positive. Both have risked their lives to promote education and better lives for children.
NEWS
October 15, 2007
IT STARTED in Detroit when the black community determined the need for an all-male academy. Then it happened here when the community acted on the same perceived need. I'm referring to the knee-jerk opposition by white feminists to make every effort to block the creation of all-male schools for black boys. They mention the needs of black girls only to use them as a tool to thwart efforts on behalf of black boys. They never address the many all-girl institutions, almost all of which are white.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 20, 2014
ISSUE | E-MAIL PORN Unbecoming clicks State Supreme Court Justice Seamus P. McCaffery can apologize until the cows come home for his avowed lapse in judgment ("Swift justice," Oct. 17). He can offer a multitude of excuses and cry foul all he wants. But passing off his actions as a direct result of his experience as a member of the Police Department, well, that's stooping pretty low. He went from being everyone's hero to being a disgrace. |Dan Dufner, Southampton Gone justice?
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Nobel committee finally got the Peace Prize right in 2014. After blowing the chance to choose Malala Yousafzai last year - as a brave and inspiring champion of girls' education worldwide - the committee finally tapped her, along with Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian campaigner against child labor. These choices couldn't have come at a better time. At a moment when the global news is nonstop negative and ugly, these heroes stand for something uplifting and positive. Both have risked their lives to promote education and better lives for children.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, an extraordinary moral authority who became South Africa's first black president and inspired the peaceful transfer of power in the harshly segregated nation, died Thursday at his home in Johannesburg. Mr. Mandela, 95, who devoted his life to fighting apartheid, became one of the 20th century's most revered leaders after he was released from nearly three decades in prison in 1990 and led the nation on a path to reconciliation rather than revolution. He shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 with F. W. de Klerk, the former South African president who negotiated the white government's abdication of power, resulting in Mr. Mandela's landslide 1994 election in the nation's first all-race vote.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE WHITE, RACIST government of South Africa held Nelson Mandela in prison for 27 years. He broke rocks into gravel and slaved in a lime quarry, where the glare from the lime damaged his eyesight. Early on, he was held in a damp cell measuring 8 feet by 7 feet, with a straw mat to sleep on. He contracted tuberculosis. Yet Mandela emerged from these horrors to become president of South Africa after the dreaded apartheid racial-separation system was lifted, shook hands with the president of the country that had jailed him, traveled widely, met numerous world figures and received many honors, including the Nobel Peace Prize and Philadelphia's Liberty Medal.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Nobel Peace Prize committee blew it big time on Friday. It could have electrified the world by giving the prize to Malala Yousafzai, the courageous Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban because of her crusade for girls' education. She was the odds-on favorite to win. And by fortuitous coincidence, Friday was also the United Nations' International Day of the Girl Child, with a focus on promoting girls' education. What a global statement the Nobel committee could have made by handing Malala the prize on that date, one year after she was shot!
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Tia Goldenberg, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israeli and global leaders, local celebrities, and Hollywood superstars celebrated under one roof Tuesday to mark Israeli President Shimon Peres' 90th birthday, reflecting world respect for one of the country's peace pioneers. Peres is hosting his annual Presidential Conference, which brings together artists, thinkers, and leaders to discuss issues relevant to Israel and the world. Instrumental in building Israel's military in the first days of the state six decades ago, he served twice as prime minister and promoted peace between Israel and the Palestinians, sometimes ahead of his own people.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Christopher Torchia, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Nelson Mandela was in serious but stable condition in a Pretoria hospital for the third day Monday with a recurring lung infection, and a foundation led by retired archbishop Desmond Tutu described the 94-year-old anti-apartheid hero as an "extraordinary gift" to South Africa. As family members visited South Africa's first black president in the hospital, the government announced - in only the second communication on Mandela since he was hospitalized on Saturday - that his condition was "unchanged.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Bjoern H. Amland, Associated Press
OSLO, Norway - The European Union received the Nobel Peace Prize on Monday for promoting peace and human rights in Europe following the devastation of World War II, and the bloc was urged to use that unity in its battle with an economic crisis that is causing suffering for many of its citizens. About 20 European government leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Francois Hollande, and Italian Premier Mario Monti, attended the ceremony in the capital of Norway, an oil-rich country that has twice rejected joining the EU. Not everyone approved the decision to give the prize to the EU, created 60 years ago as Europe was struggling to recover from a war that killed millions.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Ghana's leader wins reelection ACCRA, Ghana - The head of Ghana's election commission has announced that President John Dramani Mahama won the presidential election with 50.7 percent of the vote. Election commission chairman Kwadwo Afari-Gyan said Sunday that opposition leader Nana Akufo-Addo came in second with 47.74 percent of the vote, according to provisional results from Friday's election. Armored tanks surrounded Ghana's electoral commission and police barricaded the road around the electoral offices as the results were announced.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
Last year's awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize was a rarity, as it was divided among three women: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Leymah Gbowee of Liberia, and Tawakkol Karman of Yemen. Match up previous female winners of the award, which was first presented in 1901, with the year they were honored. 1. Jane Addams. 2. Emily Greene Balch. 3. Mairead Corrigan and Betty Williams. 4. Shirin Ebadi. 5. Wangari Maathai. 6. Rigoberta Menchu. 7. Alva Myrdal.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|