CollectionsNobel Prize
IN THE NEWS

Nobel Prize

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Nobel Prize in physics goes to three men who upended our view of the heavens by discovering that the universe, rather than continuing to slow down after the Big Bang, is now speeding up as it expands - due to a still-mysterious force that has been dubbed dark energy. One of the three is astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter, 52, a graduate of Germantown Friends School who grew up in West Mt. Airy and now works at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Malcolm Ritter and Karl Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A Frenchman and an American shared the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for inventing methods to peer into the bizarre quantum world of ultratiny particles, work that could help in creating a new generation of superfast computers. Serge Haroche of France and American David Wineland opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics in the 1990s by showing how to observe individual atoms and particles of light called photons while preserving their quantum properties. Quantum physics, a field about a century old, explains a lot about nature but includes some weird-sounding behavior by individual, isolated particles.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nobel Prize in physics goes to three men who upended our view of the heavens by discovering that the universe, rather than continuing to slow down after the Big Bang, is now speeding up as it expands - due to a still-mysterious force that has been dubbed dark energy. One of the three is astrophysicist Saul Perlmutter, 52, a graduate of Germantown Friends School, who grew up in West Mount Airy and now works at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
LOS ANGELES - F. Sherwood Rowland, the Nobel prize-winning chemist who sounded the alarm on the depletion of the Earth's ozone layer, has died. Rowland died Saturday at his home of Parkinson's disease. He was 84. Rowland was among three scientists awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize for chemistry for discovering that a byproduct of aerosol sprays could destroy the earth's atmospheric blanket. - Associated Press
NEWS
December 26, 2015
Alfred Gilman, 74, a scientist who won a Nobel Prize for his breakthrough research into the inner workings of cells, and the former dean of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, has died. A school spokesman said Thursday that Dr. Gilman's death was reported by his family. He had been fighting pancreatic cancer. Dr. Gilman shared a 1994 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Martin Rodbell of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for their discovery of G proteins.
NEWS
May 13, 2013
A Belgian university says biochemist Christian de Duve, 95, who won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1974, died in an act of euthanasia May 4. His university, UCL in Louvain-la-Neuve, confirmed it was a case of euthanasia but did not disclose the method. Mr. de Duve shared the Nobel Prize with two other scientists for their work and discoveries on the structural and functional organization of the cell. One month before his death, he made the decision to end his life and granted an interview to the daily Le Soir to be published after his death.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
A story Wednesday on new recipients of the Medal of Freedom misidentified author Toni Morrison's 1993 honor. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
October 25, 2011
Herbert Hauptman, 94, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1985 for his work uncovering the structure of molecules, has died. He had worked into his 90s at the research institute in Buffalo that now bears his name. He recently had a stroke, a colleague said Monday. Mr. Hauptman received the Nobel Prize nearly 40 years after setting out to solve a problem other scientists had given up on: how to determine molecular structures using X-ray crystallography. He used mathematical equations to interpret the patterns formed by X-rays scattered from crystals.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
STOCKHOLM - A pioneering researcher was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine yesterday, three days after dying of pancreatic cancer without ever knowing he was about to be honored for his immune-system work that he had used to prolong his own life. The Nobel committee said it was unaware that Canadian-born cell biologist Ralph Steinman had died when it awarded the prize to him, American Bruce Beutler and French scientist Jules Hoffmann. Since the committee is supposed to consider only living scientists, the Nobel Foundation held an emergency meeting yesterday and said the decision on the 10 million kronor ($1.5 million)
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Dr. Rosalyn S. Yalow, 89, a medical physicist who persisted in entering a field largely reserved for men to become only the second woman to earn a Nobel Prize in medicine, died Monday in New York City, where she had lived most of her life. Dr. Yalow, a product of New York City schools and the daughter of parents who never finished high school, graduated magna cum laude from Hunter College at age 19 and was its first physics major. Yet she struggled to be accepted for graduate studies.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 28, 2016
By Gino Segrè and Bettina Hoerlin President Obama's visit to Hiroshima Friday will rekindle debate about the dropping of the first atomic bomb. More than a few people will wonder how the decision was reached. "No acceptable alternative" was the pronouncement of four eminent physicists in 1945 that made its way to the desk of Harry Truman. This scientific panel was composed of Enrico Fermi, Arthur Compton, Ernest Lawrence - all Nobel Prize winners - and, of course, J. Robert Oppenheimer.
NEWS
December 26, 2015
Alfred Gilman, 74, a scientist who won a Nobel Prize for his breakthrough research into the inner workings of cells, and the former dean of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, has died. A school spokesman said Thursday that Dr. Gilman's death was reported by his family. He had been fighting pancreatic cancer. Dr. Gilman shared a 1994 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Martin Rodbell of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for their discovery of G proteins.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anne Case remembers the early critiques from her Ph.D. adviser, Angus Deaton: "Brutal. " "Take this away and come back with something that is more like your talents," Deaton told her. Devastated, she wanted to hide under a desk. But with his prodding, she went on to do some of her best work. After earning her doctorate in economics from Princeton, Case was hired at Harvard. That was 1988. Fast-forward a few years. Case returned to Princeton and became Deaton's colleague - and later, his wife.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Princeton University's Angus Deaton won the Nobel Prize for economics by bringing his ivory-tower profession down to earth and into homes where people are uplifted - or punished - by social, industrial, trade, and tax policies. The Scotland-born Deaton, 69, earned his degrees at Britain's elite Cambridge University back when it gave students few mandatory courses and lots of discretion to pursue their interests, he told an applauding crowd Monday at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of International and Public Affairs hours after learning he had won the prize from the Sweden-based Nobel selection committee that included a Princeton colleague.
NEWS
October 8, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are among the most numerous particles in the universe, subatomic ghosts silently whizzing through our bodies millions of times a second. And yet physicists were mystified as to why two-thirds of these particles, called neutrinos, seemed to be missing in action. This year's Nobel Prize in physics is going to a pair of scientists from Canada and Japan who discovered what was really happening, the prize committee announced Tuesday. The project led by the Canadian scientist, deep inside a nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario, got a big assist from the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Merck & Co. scientist is sharing the Nobel Prize in medicine for helping to discover a treatment for two parasitic diseases that have stricken millions in the developing world. William C. Campbell, 85, who later became a faculty member at Drew University in Madison, N.J., will get the award in Stockholm, Sweden, on Dec. 10 along with Satoshi Omura, a professor emeritus at Kitasato University in Japan. The two each will receive about $240,000 for their success in combating river blindness, caused by a parasite transmitted through the bite of river-dwelling black flies, and elephantiasis, marked by severe swelling and disfigurement of the limbs.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irwin A. Rose, 88, an eminent biochemist at Fox Chase Cancer Center who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for codiscovering how cells break down unwanted proteins, died in his sleep ealry Tuesday at his son's home in Deerfield, Mass. The prize was shared with Avram Hershko and Aaron Ciechanover of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. Their work had a profound impact on the scientific world's understanding of cell division, DNA repair, and immune function. It also led other scientists to develop novel cancer therapies.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The AIDS community mourned the loss of one of its top researchers and advocates in the jet crash in Ukraine, a "humanist" whose life - and death - reminded some of the death of another leading AIDS scientist, from Philadelphia, in a plane crash 16 years ago. Six delegates to the 20th International AIDS Conference - down from initial reports of 100 - were confirmed to have been on the plane, shot down en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia....
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook and Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writers
Lawrence R. Klein, 93, of Gladwyne, a University of Pennsylvania economics professor who won a Nobel Prize and was considered the father of modern economic forecasting, died Sunday, Oct. 20, of a heart ailment at his home. Dr. Klein, who observed both the Depression and the post-World War II boom, influenced many of the current generation of economic forecasters by developing models in the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the economic forecasts taken as commonplace today - such as the effect of interest rates on economic growth - exist because of Dr. Klein's innovations, say economists.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
Physicist Kenneth Wilson, 77, who earned a Nobel Prize for pioneering work that changed the way physicists think about phase transitions, has died in Maine, where he retired to enjoy kayaking with his wife. Mr. Wilson, who died Saturday from complications of lymphoma, was in the physics department at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., when he won the Nobel Prize in 1982 for applying his research in quantum physics to phase transitions, the transformation that occurs when a substance goes from, say, liquid to gas. Mr. Wilson created a mathematical tool called the renormalization group that is still widely used in physics.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|