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Nobel Prize

BUSINESS
November 9, 2008 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
The economy was the number-one issue in the presidential race won by Democrat Barack Obama. So, what happens now? Can a president do anything? Let's find out. Prez can't fix it. Gerald Ford famously exhorted Americans to "Whip Inflation Now," partly by wearing "WIN" buttons. This preelection Newsweek article contests the notion that a president - any president - can "fix" the economy. It does, however, say that some presidential decisions over the years have managed to hurt the economy, at least temporarily.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The AIDS community mourned the loss of one of its top researchers and advocates in the jet crash in Ukraine, a "humanist" whose life - and death - reminded some of the death of another leading AIDS scientist, from Philadelphia, in a plane crash 16 years ago. Six delegates to the 20th International AIDS Conference - down from initial reports of 100 - were confirmed to have been on the plane, shot down en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia....
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irwin A. Rose, 88, an eminent biochemist at Fox Chase Cancer Center who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for codiscovering how cells break down unwanted proteins, died in his sleep ealry Tuesday at his son's home in Deerfield, Mass. The prize was shared with Avram Hershko and Aaron Ciechanover of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. Their work had a profound impact on the scientific world's understanding of cell division, DNA repair, and immune function. It also led other scientists to develop novel cancer therapies.
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
So you think we've got cynics here in America. How about the comment from Moscow's Foreign Ministry spokesman when Mikhail Gorbachev won the Nobel Peace Prize? "This certainly was not the Nobel prize for economics," said Gennadi Gerasimov. How true! Despite Gorbachev's almost unbelievable accomplishments on the international stage, the bread lines in Moscow remain, and shortages of everything from vodka to potatoes threaten domestic peace and tranquility. Gorbachev's fault?
NEWS
October 14, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - While some Europeans swelled with pride when the European Union won the Nobel Peace Prize, howls of derision erupted from the continent's large band of skeptics. To many in the 27-nation bloc, the EU is an unwieldy and unloved agglomeration overseen by a top-heavy bureaucracy devoted to creating arcane regulations about everything from cheese to fishing quotas. Set up with noble goals after the devastation of World War II, the EU now appears to critics to be impotent amid a debt crisis that has widened north-south divisions, threatened the euro currency and plunged several members, from Greece to Ireland to Spain, into economic turmoil.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a summer's day in 1943, a young scientist at Rutgers discovered an antibiotic that would change millions of lives. But Albert Schatz, who died in West Mount Airy in 2005, was denied credit. His name never appeared on the Nobel Prize given for that work.   That's the little-known story told in Peter Pringle's new book, Experiment Eleven: Dark Secrets Behind the Discovery of a Wonder Drug (Walker & Company, 269 pp., $26). And there's a widow who remembers, and a grandson conquering cerebral palsy to create a documentary film honoring his wronged grandfather's work.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Karl Ritter and Malin Rising, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM - Israeli scientist Dan Shechtman was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for a discovery that faced skepticism and mockery, even prompting his expulsion from his research team, before it won widespread acceptance as a breakthrough. While doing research in the United States in 1982, Shechtman discovered a new chemical structure - quasicrystals - that researchers previously thought was impossible. He was studying a mix of aluminum and manganese in an electron microscope when he found the atoms were arranged in a pattern that appeared contrary to the laws of nature.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anne Case remembers the early critiques from her Ph.D. adviser, Angus Deaton: "Brutal. " "Take this away and come back with something that is more like your talents," Deaton told her. Devastated, she wanted to hide under a desk. But with his prodding, she went on to do some of her best work. After earning her doctorate in economics from Princeton, Case was hired at Harvard. That was 1988. Fast-forward a few years. Case returned to Princeton and became Deaton's colleague - and later, his wife.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook and Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writers
Lawrence R. Klein, 93, of Gladwyne, a University of Pennsylvania economics professor who won a Nobel Prize and was considered the father of modern economic forecasting, died Sunday, Oct. 20, of a heart ailment at his home. Dr. Klein, who observed both the Depression and the post-World War II boom, influenced many of the current generation of economic forecasters by developing models in the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the economic forecasts taken as commonplace today - such as the effect of interest rates on economic growth - exist because of Dr. Klein's innovations, say economists.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Merck & Co. scientist is sharing the Nobel Prize in medicine for helping to discover a treatment for two parasitic diseases that have stricken millions in the developing world. William C. Campbell, 85, who later became a faculty member at Drew University in Madison, N.J., will get the award in Stockholm, Sweden, on Dec. 10 along with Satoshi Omura, a professor emeritus at Kitasato University in Japan. The two each will receive about $240,000 for their success in combating river blindness, caused by a parasite transmitted through the bite of river-dwelling black flies, and elephantiasis, marked by severe swelling and disfigurement of the limbs.
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