CollectionsNobel Prize
IN THE NEWS

Nobel Prize

NEWS
October 14, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - While some Europeans swelled with pride when the European Union won the Nobel Peace Prize, howls of derision erupted from the continent's large band of skeptics. To many in the 27-nation bloc, the EU is an unwieldy and unloved agglomeration overseen by a top-heavy bureaucracy devoted to creating arcane regulations about everything from cheese to fishing quotas. Set up with noble goals after the devastation of World War II, the EU now appears to critics to be impotent amid a debt crisis that has widened north-south divisions, threatened the euro currency and plunged several members, from Greece to Ireland to Spain, into economic turmoil.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rapper Nelly had some 'splainin' to do Friday. First of all, realize! You do not drive anywhere near the Sierra Blanca border patrol down in Texas. Police there will jack you up if their superschnozz dogs detect a whiff of contraband. Fiona Apple got done there last month, and Willie Nelson , Armie Hammer , and Snoop Dogg all have experienced this fine service. When the zealous fuzz inspected Nelly's tour bus, they found - whoa! - 36 small bags of heroin, 10 pounds of pot, and a .45 pistol.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Karl Ritter and Louise Nordstrom, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Chinese writer Mo Yan won the Nobel Prize in literature on Thursday, a cause of pride for a government that had disowned the only previous Chinese winner of the award, an exiled critic. National television broke into its newscast to announce the prize - exceptional for the tightly scripted broadcast that usually focuses on the doings of Chinese leaders. The Swedish Academy, which selects the winners, praised Mo's "hallucinatory realism" saying it "merges folk tales, history and the contemporary.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Malcolm Ritter and Karl Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A Frenchman and an American shared the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for inventing methods to peer into the bizarre quantum world of ultratiny particles, work that could help in creating a new generation of superfast computers. Serge Haroche of France and American David Wineland opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics in the 1990s by showing how to observe individual atoms and particles of light called photons while preserving their quantum properties. Quantum physics, a field about a century old, explains a lot about nature but includes some weird-sounding behavior by individual, isolated particles.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Russian-born billionaire who dropped out of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School has just made the Nobel Prize for Physics look like chump change. Yuri Milner, 50, has made big splashes before, investing hundreds of millions in the likes of Facebook and Groupon, gracing the cover of Forbes last year, and, this spring, spending $100 million for a single-family Silicon Valley home. Now, Milner, who was educated as a physicist before seeking his Wharton M.B.A. in the early '90s, has awarded $3 million each to nine physicists, including four at Princeton's Center for Advanced Study.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
OSLO, Norway - Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi declared Saturday that the Nobel Peace Prize she won while under house arrest 21 years ago helped shatter her sense of isolation and ensured that the world would demand democracy in her military-controlled homeland. Suu Kyi received two standing ovations in Oslo's city hall as she gave her long-delayed acceptance speech to the Norwegian Nobel Committee in front of Norway's King Harald, Queen Sonja, and about 600 dignitaries.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
A story Wednesday on new recipients of the Medal of Freedom misidentified author Toni Morrison's 1993 honor. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a summer's day in 1943, a young scientist at Rutgers discovered an antibiotic that would change millions of lives. But Albert Schatz, who died in West Mount Airy in 2005, was denied credit. His name never appeared on the Nobel Prize given for that work.   That's the little-known story told in Peter Pringle's new book, Experiment Eleven: Dark Secrets Behind the Discovery of a Wonder Drug (Walker & Company, 269 pp., $26). And there's a widow who remembers, and a grandson conquering cerebral palsy to create a documentary film honoring his wronged grandfather's work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2012 | Wires / McClatchy
Home By Toni Morrison Alfred A. Knopf. 147 pp. ($24)   Reviewed by Amy Driscoll   Mention Toni Morrison's name and the superlatives follow. Nobel Prize. Pulitzer Prize. This spring, she'll add Presidential Medal of Freedom winner to the list. But in her new book, a slim volume titled simply Home that Morrison will discuss Friday night at the Free Library of Philadelphia, the power comes not from the world-famous author's name printed on the cover but from the story within.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Todd Pitman and Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - She struggled for a free Myanmar for a quarter-century, much of it spent locked away under house arrest. Now, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate whose nonviolent campaign for democracy at home transformed her into a global icon is on the verge of ascending to public office for the first time. Aung San Suu Kyi, 66, was elected to parliament Sunday in a historic victory buffeted by the jubilant cheers of supporters who hope her triumph will mark a major turning point in a nation still emerging from a ruthless era of military rule.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|