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Nobel Prize

NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Russian-born billionaire who dropped out of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School has just made the Nobel Prize for Physics look like chump change. Yuri Milner, 50, has made big splashes before, investing hundreds of millions in the likes of Facebook and Groupon, gracing the cover of Forbes last year, and, this spring, spending $100 million for a single-family Silicon Valley home. Now, Milner, who was educated as a physicist before seeking his Wharton M.B.A. in the early '90s, has awarded $3 million each to nine physicists, including four at Princeton's Center for Advanced Study.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
OSLO, Norway - Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi declared Saturday that the Nobel Peace Prize she won while under house arrest 21 years ago helped shatter her sense of isolation and ensured that the world would demand democracy in her military-controlled homeland. Suu Kyi received two standing ovations in Oslo's city hall as she gave her long-delayed acceptance speech to the Norwegian Nobel Committee in front of Norway's King Harald, Queen Sonja, and about 600 dignitaries.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
A story Wednesday on new recipients of the Medal of Freedom misidentified author Toni Morrison's 1993 honor. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.com .
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a summer's day in 1943, a young scientist at Rutgers discovered an antibiotic that would change millions of lives. But Albert Schatz, who died in West Mount Airy in 2005, was denied credit. His name never appeared on the Nobel Prize given for that work.   That's the little-known story told in Peter Pringle's new book, Experiment Eleven: Dark Secrets Behind the Discovery of a Wonder Drug (Walker & Company, 269 pp., $26). And there's a widow who remembers, and a grandson conquering cerebral palsy to create a documentary film honoring his wronged grandfather's work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2012 | Wires / McClatchy
Home By Toni Morrison Alfred A. Knopf. 147 pp. ($24)   Reviewed by Amy Driscoll   Mention Toni Morrison's name and the superlatives follow. Nobel Prize. Pulitzer Prize. This spring, she'll add Presidential Medal of Freedom winner to the list. But in her new book, a slim volume titled simply Home that Morrison will discuss Friday night at the Free Library of Philadelphia, the power comes not from the world-famous author's name printed on the cover but from the story within.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Todd Pitman and Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - She struggled for a free Myanmar for a quarter-century, much of it spent locked away under house arrest. Now, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate whose nonviolent campaign for democracy at home transformed her into a global icon is on the verge of ascending to public office for the first time. Aung San Suu Kyi, 66, was elected to parliament Sunday in a historic victory buffeted by the jubilant cheers of supporters who hope her triumph will mark a major turning point in a nation still emerging from a ruthless era of military rule.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | They Say: A History of the Nobel Peace Prize Jay Nordlinger?is a senior editor of National Review and the author of the just-released "Peace
Jay Nordlinger?is a senior editor of National Review and the author of the just-released "Peace, They Say: A History of the Nobel Peace Prize, the Most Famous and Controversial Prize in the World" (Encounter Books) The story of the Nobel Peace Prize is a long one, beginning in 1901. It is also an interesting one, boasting a huge, diverse cast of characters. In 1947, it becomes a bit of a Philadelphia story. The prize was shared that year by two Quaker relief organizations: the Friends Service Council in London and the American Friends Service Committee in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
LOS ANGELES - F. Sherwood Rowland, the Nobel prize-winning chemist who sounded the alarm on the depletion of the Earth's ozone layer, has died. Rowland died Saturday at his home of Parkinson's disease. He was 84. Rowland was among three scientists awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize for chemistry for discovering that a byproduct of aerosol sprays could destroy the earth's atmospheric blanket. - Associated Press
NEWS
February 21, 2012
Renato Dulbecco, 97, who shared the 1975 Nobel Prize in medicine for his seminal research on the interaction between tumors and cells, died Sunday in California. Dr. Dulbecco, an early proponent of sequencing genomes that led to the Human Genome Project, died in La Jolla, Italy's National Research Council - where Dr. Dulbecco worked on the genome project in the 1990s - said Monday. Dr. Dulbecco was a founding fellow of the La Jolla-based Salk Institute for Biological Studies, where he was an emeritus president and distinguished professor.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to a couple of furious comebacks, South Jersey's Brandon Libby returns on Jeopardy! tonight as a two-time champ. The syndicated quiz show airs on 6ABC at 7 p.m. Libby, 33, who grew up and lives in Mount Ephraim, was in third place going into Final Jeopardy on Thursday's and Friday's shows, but each time he alone came up with the right question. (Want to test yourself? The answers were "1 of 2 American women authors nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938" and "The traditional inaugural lunch for this President & V.P. featured boiled stuffed lobster & prime ribs of beef au jus. " See correct responses at article's end.)
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