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Noise

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NEWS
July 22, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The parking problems that plagued the residential neighborhood around Boomerang's nightclub on the Delaware River have almost vanished, Commissioner Thomas J. Giancristoforo reported. But the noise level outside the 2-month-old club is still too high despite the club's addition of sound barriers and the rearrangement of stereo speakers, he said at Monday night's board meeting. Since portions of five roads near the club were restricted to residential- permit parking at the end of last month, Giancristoforo said he had received few complaints of neighbors unable to park.
NEWS
April 20, 2011
THE CITY'S new agreement with Ride the Ducks that will return the boats to the Delaware River seems to address the safety failures that led to the tourist boat ride's fatal accident last summer. And a new provision will keep the duck boats quieter: "Quackers," those annoying sound-makers that riders use to bleat through the streets, will now be given out at the end of the tours instead of the beginning. We're not sure what this has to do with safety, but it has a lot to do with sanity.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Stephanie Banchero, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Residents of Kings Road in Plymouth Township have been complaining since the Blue Route opened in December that the dirt berm behind their homes was not sufficient to block out traffic noise. So 10 homeowners have been asking officials of the state Department of Transportation to construct a sound barrier. PennDot hasn't decided. Now, the Plymouth Township Council and Richard Tilghman, the state senator from the 17th District, plan to get involved. Tilghman and two members of the Township Council are trying to set up a meeting with a PennDot sound barrier expert to address the concerns of their constituents.
NEWS
June 23, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
While officials at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County in Mount Holly say their new Mobile Magnetic Resonance Imaging unit provides a community service, residents of the neighborhood surrounding the hospital complain that it keeps them awake at night. Madison Avenue resident Stephanie Wingett complained to the Mount Holly Township Council on June 10 that the large truck tractor that delivers the mobile-unit trailer to the hospital on a rotating schedule during odd hours of the late night and early morning is disturbing the usually quiet neighborhood.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | By Lisa Kozleski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sounds of Montego Bay at the Woodbine Inn will not keep Cinnaminson residents awake this summer, but the residents did not keep the Woodbine from renewing its liquor license. A two-hour hearing last night drew a dozen disgruntled Cinnaminson residents and their township solicitor, all protesting what they say has been excessive noise created by live music, DJs and patrons at the outdoor nightclub during the last two summers. The outdoor area of the nightclub on Route 73 has been silent since last August, when Burlington County Judge John A. Sweeney ordered it closed until general manager Nick Kouvatas and Woodbine officials can prove they have reduced the noise, which carries quickly over the Pennsauken Creek to homes in the Glen Meade section of the neighboring township.
NEWS
January 2, 1992 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
A new ordinance aimed at controlling excessive noise from televisions and stereos in Lumberton Township also focuses on noise generated by the construction of new homes. Members of the Township Committee unanimously approved the ordinance at their Dec. 16 meeting after a public hearing in which several farmers voiced fear they would be affected by the measure. But the township's clerk and administrator, Patricia Rainear, said farmers would be protected by the state Right to Farm Act. "This ordinance really is a guideline for the Police Department to follow when they receive a noise complaint," Rainear said.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Year-round, but in the winter especially, the northeast wind carries the rumbling, clattering noises from the Cinnaminson Industrial Park straight to the rooftops of homes in the small Rolling Greens neighborhood. Those noises shook houses and kept people up at night, residents said. The trees that had afforded a modest sound barrier were being chopped down to accommodate the expansion of various companies in the park. Morton Raphelson, with 29 years of residency on Winding Way, said he remembers when the industrial park, just north of Rolling Greens along River Road, was only woods.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Memorial Hospital of Burlington County in Mount Holly is being as cooperative as possible in satisfying neighbors who have been disturbed by the facility's new mobile magnetic resonance imaging unit, hospital officials say. After Madison Avenue residents complained to the Township Council in June about noise generated by a tractor-trailer that delivers the mobile unit to the hospital late at night and early in the morning, hospital officials said...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
A Satiesque piano wafts through space. A Technicolor orchestra creeps behind, entering from stage left. An actor, John Hurt, is introduced. "When Debussy died on March the 25th, 1918, in Paris, it was being bombarded by the Germans. And it was raining," he announces, then clears the stage, leaving an opera diva's wail, wah-wah guitars, bulbous synth-bass, and a rush of soft jungle rhythm in his wake. "It's weeping in my heart like it's raining in the town," Hurt whispers in a deeply sensual burr from the wings.
NEWS
January 17, 1987 | By Melvin Maddocks
Daily life is a noisy business. We said, NOISY. Why, you can hardly hear yourself think. We said, THINK. Automobile horns. Jet engines. Rock music. You know, the stuff that comes out of your Walkman headphones in order to drown out all the other noise. A person has to shout to be heard - louder and louder. And that's not great for the vocal chords. Evolution did not develop the human voice to its highest potential for the purpose of yelling "Taxi!" on Fifth Avenue on a rainy afternoon in New York, the scream capital of the world.
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NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
AUSTIN, Texas - The volume turned up Tuesday as the raucous SXSW Music Festival took the baton from the geeky Interactive conference, and thousands of rock and rap fans poured into Austin. SXSW Interactive drew to a close with its final panels Tuesday afternoon. Neil Young rolled out his hi-fi online music store and player PonoMusic. Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen talked Portlandia . Chelsea Clinton gave a keynote. And then the music began. Once again, this year's fest is packed with huge names unable to resist the promotional opportunity SXSW offers, all attaching their names to corporate brands.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
C ARLOS AND ADRIENNE Rogers, both 44, of Riverton, N.J., are a married couple who co-own Hush Salon Philadelphia. The salon, which opened in 2008, recently moved into a former women's boutique on 3rd Street near Cherry in Old City. I spoke with Carlos. Q: How did you come up with the idea for the biz? A: I was doing self-taught barbering in between other jobs. In 2002, I decided to go to beauty school. At the time, I was dating my wife, who'd been a hairdresser for 10 years.
REAL_ESTATE
December 22, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
You might recall the letter a few weeks back about a "strange humming noise" that was driving a reader and her family batty. The problem: "For at least eight months, there has been a subtle, rhythmic hum that is constantly audible throughout my house that everyone hears. The noise is always the same, with no change in the pitch or pattern. We turned off the main breaker to the house to determine if it might be from one of our home systems, and it was still audible. " I sought help from the "Your Place" community, and, as the column made its way from Philadelphia to newspapers across the country, I received more e-mails offering solutions than I could count.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Noise is so ubiquitous you might not even notice that you've forgotten what silence sounds like. There are sirens, buses, planes, squealing brakes, and hostile horns if you frequent the city, and lawn mowers, leaf blowers, snow blowers, and over-vigilant dogs if you don't. There's whatever you're blasting through your ear buds, voices from the next 12 cubicles over, jarring cellphone ring tones, the television, children screaming, roaring sports fans, restaurants so loud you have laryngitis when you leave, snoring.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Sleigh Bells revel in contrasts. The duo of guitarist Derek Miller (who played in the hard-core band Poison the Well) and vocalist Alexis Krauss (who sang in the teen pop group RubyBlue and was, for a time, an elementary-school teacher) create songs of immediate, noisy catharsis. But their process involves careful attention to detail. They cross Miller's power-chords with Krauss' singsong, cheerleader vocals, and cross that combo again with block-rockin' electronics, each calibrated for maximum effect.
REAL_ESTATE
November 11, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
This problem requires the assistance of the "Your Place" community. Please send in your ideas. Question: For at least eight months, there has been a subtle, rhythmic hum that is constantly audible throughout my house that everyone hears. The noise is always the same, with no change in the pitch or pattern. We turned off the main breaker to the house to determine if it might be coming from one of our home systems, and it was still audible. We can also hear it when standing outside of my house.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
I USUALLY WRITE about what's not working. You know, Congress, the Legislature, Philly schools. Mostly I place fault with those in charge; all those in charge, regardless of party. I do this in hopes that bringing attention to what's wrong can serve as motivation to make it right. Sometimes that works. Some years ago, I wrote about a decorated Pennsylvania State Police trooper whose wife and three children were denied death benefits after the trooper died of a heart attack on duty.
SPORTS
October 13, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taylor Lewan knows the atmosphere Saturday night at Beaver Stadium will be electric and that the noise from the sellout crowd of more than 106,000 will make his ears ring. However, even though he'll be wearing the uniform of visiting Michigan, the all-American offensive tackle is excited about the opportunity to compete against Penn State in such a setting. "Sometimes we'll be standing face to face [with a teammate] and I won't be able to hear myself think or hear you talk," Lewan said Monday at a press conference in Ann Arbor, Mich.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
I wish I had never seen Michael Frayn's Noises Off . Correction: I wish I had never seen any other company's production of his comedy, now receiving a sensationally funny staging at People's Light and Theatre Company. Frayn's farce focuses on a British theater troupe embarking on a tour of the fictional Nothing On . Act 1 shows them fumbling through the last rehearsal before their first opening night; Act 3 catches up with them toward the end of the run, where the intra-cast hostilities and failed romances have all but consumed the production with mayhem and malice.
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