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Nominee

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BUSINESS
June 11, 2011 | By Meera Louis, Bloomberg News
President Obama intends to nominate Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Vice Chairman Martin J. Gruenberg to succeed Sheila Bair as chairman, according to a White House statement issued Friday night. Gruenberg has been the agency's vice chairman since 2005 and was acting chairman for six months in 2005 and 2006. He would replace Bair, who was appointed by President George W. Bush and took office in June 2006. She led the agency through the worst wave of banking failures since the savings-and-loan crisis of the 1980s.
NEWS
April 17, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Christie's nominee to head the state Department of Children and Families withdrew from consideration for the post on Friday. In a letter to the governor, Janet Rosenzweig said the confirmation process was "distracting from the important work of this department. " She did not offer further explanation. Last month, Rosenzweig faced tough questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee, in particular about her past work for the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality.
NEWS
October 7, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Jasmine Silva may be only 5 1/2, but she continues to make her small voice heard. The first-grader from North Philadelphia is best known as probably the youngest member of the press corps ever to interview President Reagan. Jasmine, representing the Children's Free Press, met Reagan at a fund-raiser in Philadelphia for U.S. Sen. John Heinz last month during the Constitution bicentennial. She asked Reagan, she said afterward, "if Judge (Robert) Bork would be good for the future, and he said 'yes.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | By Donald Kaul Donald Kaul is a syndicated columnist
Ihave a confession to make. I was brainwashed by conservatives. I know, I know - next to telling the National Enquirer you've been kidnapped by alien creatures, it's the most embarrassing admission you can make, but there it is. I'm not sure how it happened. One minute, I was keeping my guard up against right-wing blather; the next, I'd fallen victim to a sucker punch, from Robert Bork, of all people. You remember Bork. After playing a Rosencrantz/Guildenstern role in the Watergate Follies, he hit big time when nominated to the Supreme Court by Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Jill Morrison, Special to The Inquirer
For most college-bound high school seniors, the last few months of the school year are a time of nervous waiting - waiting to find out what university sweat shirt they will don come August. But some Bucks County students who have been nominated to one or several military academies by U.S. Rep. Peter Kostmayer are especially anxious to find out their fate. They want to serve their country, and the war in the Persian Gulf has fueled their desire. "It's made me pursue this even more," said Timothy Komada, a senior at Holy Ghost Preparatory School in Holland and nominee for the Air Force and Naval Academies as well as West Point.
NEWS
July 10, 2005
The Senate Judiciary Committee is preparing to conduct one of the most important job interviews in decades. The senators shouldn't beat around the bush with the applicant. Even before President Bush nominates a candidate for the Supreme Court, partisans on both sides are trying to manipulate the ground rules. Some who want the court to outlaw abortion, for example, argue that it's inappropriate for lawmakers to press a nominee on his/her views about the subject. By trying to limit this line of inquiry, they hope to enable a conservative justice who's hostile to Roe v. Wade to be confirmed with a minimum of probing questions.
SPORTS
October 15, 2010
Nominations are being accepted for deserving high school football players for the Leonard Weaver/Daily News award. If you are a high school coach and wish to have a player considered, please send an e-mail to Daily News assistant sports editor Chuck Bausman at bausmac@phillynews.com . Please include information about the players' academic and athletic achievement, and contact information for us to reach him. Nominations will only be accepted from coaches.  
NEWS
February 9, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Once again, most of the attention in the capital this week will focus on the Senate and its confirmation process of Gov. Casey's nominees for state treasurer and Cabinet positions. The House of Representatives, while in session, is not expected to consider any major legislation on the floor. So far this session, 232 bills have been referred to House committees, where they will be discussed first. Stephen C. MacNett, top aide to Senate Majority Leader John Stauffer (R., Chester)
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in memory, the Senate has spurned a presidential nomination to the largest advisory panel of the National Endowment for the Humanities. In a 9-8 vote yesterday, the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee rejected the appointment of Carol Iannone, a professor in the Gallatin Division of New York University, to the 26-member National Council on the Humanities. The largely partisan vote climaxed a bitter and lengthy controversy pitting Lynne V. Cheney, head of the endowment, against many of the nation's largest scholarly groups, led by the 29,000-member Modern Language Association (MLA)
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn and Steve Peoples, Associated Press
WEST MONROE, La. - Facing heightened pressure to revive his presidential bid, Rick Santorum was forced to explain another apparent misstep as he courted Louisiana voters Friday, the eve of a critical contest in a Republican nomination battle that increasingly favors Mitt Romney. Santorum said he would support the eventual GOP nominee if it isn't him despite what he insisted were similarities between front-runner Romney and President Obama that make them indistinguishable on some issues.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Following months of controversy, Gov. Wolf's embattled choice to lead the Pennsylvania State Police on Monday withdrew his name from consideration. Acting State Police Commissioner Marcus Brown's decision was announced in a statement from the governor's office. In it, Brown did not state a reason for the decision. But Wolf cited politics. "Marcus Brown is the type of leader that Pennsylvania would be lucky to have," the governor said in the statement. "Despite Marcus' vast and unquestioned qualifications, the Senate wrongfully rejected his nomination in a move that put politics above the best interests of the people of Pennsylvania, and it is now appropriate to select a new nominee to lead the Pennsylvania State Police.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was Gov. Wolf's first major political setback. And it isn't resolved yet. After Senate Republicans on Monday voted down Wolf's choice to lead the State Police - and, more unusually, ignored his request to withdraw the nomination before the vote - the first-term Democrat still has hard choices to make about the fate of the would-be top cop, Marcus Brown. Both parties are grappling with which of Wolf's options are even legal: Can Brown, still serving as acting commissioner, stay on the job indefinitely?
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In its sharpest rebuke yet to Pennsylvania's first-term governor, the Republican-led Senate on Monday rejected Gov. Wolf's controversial choice to lead the state police and signaled it would be unlikely to reconsider. Hours after Wolf tried to withdraw the nomination, the chamber ignored his request and voted, 26-22, against the permanent appointment of acting Commissioner Marcus Brown. Observers said it was the first time they could recall the full Senate shooting down a governor's cabinet pick.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - For the second time in as many months, a panel of state senators on Tuesday chose to not endorse one of Gov. Wolf's cabinet nominees - amid signs that steeper odds await the next one. After a hearing, the Environmental Resources and Energy Committee declined to take a position on acting Secretary of Environmental Protection John Quigley before moving his nomination to the full Senate for consideration. Forwarding the nomination without open support is an unusual step and reflects friction between the first-term Democrat and the Republican-controlled legislature as they embark on budget negotiations.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
The November ballot for mayor of Philadelphia at this point may be missing a big name. Former City Councilman Bill Green IV, a lifelong Democrat and son of a former mayor, is weighing an independent challenge to the expected ascension of Democratic nominee James F. Kenney. "I have kept my options open to evaluate the election results and make a determination," Green, a member of the Philadelphia School Reform Commission, said Tuesday. He added that a recent Inquirer poll, which found that 43 percent of voters think the city is headed in the wrong direction, showed "an opening for somebody who is capable of being mayor" as an alternative.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the votes rolled in, the party rolled on - big, loud and growing, a celebratory scene where a son of South Philadelphia and the son of a firefighter became the presumptive next mayor of Philadelphia. In a ballroom where supporters cheered, danced, and sang along to Bruce Springsteen and the Eagles stood the real-life evidence of the unlikely coalition that Democratic nominee James F. Kenney created - Irish Catholics, cops and firefighters, gays and lesbians, building trades unions, black politicians who crossed the color line for a white candidate.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | John Baer, Daily News Political Columnist
TODAY'S FOCUS was to be on the apparent further decline of Philly's "racial math," and Jim Kenney facing perennial problems of poverty, schools, crime and policing. You know, what's it all mean and how does Mayor Kenney address these issues? I mean, the Democratic primary winner is the next mayor; been that way for 64 years. But then I chat with Bill Green. When I ask about Kenney's biggest challenges, Green says, "The concept [of writing] about what the Democratic nominee might face is getting a little ahead of itself.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf's embattled nominee to head the Pennsylvania State Police will not face criminal charges or fines for removing road signs near his Harrisburg-area home that were critical of him, a central Pennsylvania prosecutor announced Thursday. But Cumberland County District Attorney David J. Freed told reporters that everyone involved in the incident - from acting State Police Commissioner Marcus Brown to the retired trooper who erected the road signs and then videotaped the top cop removing them - "should have known better.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf's nominee to serve as secretary of state faced resistance Tuesday from Republican lawmakers who said he deserved blame for not stopping Philadelphia abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell. After a hearing, the Senate State Government Committee declined to take a position on Pedro Cortes - an unusual step - and instead moved his nomination to the full Senate floor for consideration. The committee chairman, Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon), said after the hearing that the panel was split on Cortes, but that he wanted to give all senators the chance "to make the decisions based on their own conscience.
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