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NEWS
March 17, 2016
If Merrick Garland were a team in the NCAA basketball tournament, few if any office-pool brackets would have President Obama's Supreme Court nominee making it past the first round. The odds are against Garland's Senate confirmation, but not because he isn't qualified. In fact, less than a week before Obama's announcement Wednesday, Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, the longest-serving Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, called Garland "a fine man" for the court. Hatch further opined that Obama would nominate someone more liberal "because this appointment is about the election.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Sen. Pat Toomey held firm to his stand Wednesday that the next president should fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court, even as President Obama pushed a nominee to the fore. With the court's "balance at stake, and with the presidential election fewer than eight months away, it is wise to give the American people a more direct voice," the Pennsylvania Republican said shortly after Obama nominated Merrick Garland, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Not even Vice President Biden, a 36-year Senate veteran and former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, would be afforded the courtesy of a Senate interview, much less a Judiciary Committee hearing, should President Obama nominate him to fill the seat left vacant by the passing of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Or so I was recently told by Utah's Sen. Orrin Hatch, one of the 11 Republicans on the committee who signed a letter saying they will "withhold consent on any nominee to the Supreme Court submitted by this president to fill Justice Scalia's vacancy.
NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
IS THIS THE WAY a political party dies, not with a bang, but with squabbling over spray tans, small hands, and sweat? As billionaire populist Donald Trump took control of the Republican presidential race on Super Tuesday, a civil war already was raging in the party between those who vow they could never vote for a man they consider a bigot and a fraud, and other leaders preaching the need to unify around the eventual nominee in order to defeat Democrat...
NEWS
March 3, 2016
REPUBLICANS now want to "Dump the Trump"? Come on. Too late, dudes. Shoulda listened when you had a chance. Last August, I wrote that if party leaders didn't want Trump, they needed to act, put together a deal to winnow the field with promises of future rewards and settle on a pair that could win in November. I even noted that a GOP ticket able to take Florida and (especially) Ohio can snag enough Electoral College votes to win the general election. Know the last Republican elected president without winning Ohio?
NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Senate President Stephen Sweeney said Tuesday that Democrats would not hold a hearing for Gov. Christie's pick to fill a vacancy on the New Jersey Supreme Court, arguing that confirming the governor's nominee would break precedent by driving the court too far to the right. "The only way I will consider a Christie nominee is if the governor preserves judicial independence by submitting a Democrat for the court," Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said in a statement a day after Christie nominated Judge David Bauman of Monmouth County.
NEWS
February 18, 2016 | By Dana Milbank
In the first minutes after the shocking news spread Saturday that Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia had died, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley tried to be reasonable. It didn't go well for him. The Iowa Republican, informed in a phone call from Des Moines Register reporter Jason Noble that Scalia had died, responded honorably, saying he didn't want to talk about replacing Scalia yet. "I wouldn't make any prognostication on anything about the future because there's so many balls in the air when those things are considered," he said.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Staff Writer
FOR POLITICAL enthusiasts, the Iowa caucuses are the equivalent of baseball's opening day - except they arrive after what seems like three years of spring training. Unlike a traditional primary, caucus states use groups of voters to decide their choice of presidential candidates. In Iowa's case, meetings are held among eligible voters in 1,600-plus precincts on Monday to debate the qualifications of various candidates, discuss party platforms and to select delegates. These delegates each back a presidential candidate.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Josh Singer is really in the spotlight now. On Thursday morning, the name of the Ambler native and Harvard Law-grad-turned-Hollywood scribe was announced alongside the likes of DiCaprio, Damon, and Blanchett when nominations for the 88th Academy Awards were read off in Beverly Hills, Calif. Singer, along with co-writer Tom McCarthy, is a nominee for the original screenplay Oscar for Spotlight , the searing true story of the Boston Globe's Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation into pedophile priests in the Catholic Church.
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