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Nonfiction

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NEWS
December 20, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Buying an audio book for your favorite listener can be an expensive proposition unless you go for something very short or very abridged. Fortunately, for those who like fiction, there are two novellas that are very good. And when it comes to nonfiction, which somehow seems to withstand the abridging process a bit better than fiction, there's a virtual sleigh full of good titles. The best recent audio fiction is Norman Maclean's A River Runs Through It, (Audio Press, 4 1/2 hours, $24.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2009 | By Katie Haegele FOR THE INQUIRER
Ah, fall. The season of spookiness, of football, and of leaf-peeping is about to give way to the interminable holidays, but readers of young adult books can hold onto autumn a little longer. The ever-growing genre continues to turn out interesting books, and this season gives us tons of new titles to be excited about: nonfiction on surprising topics, and novels nuanced enough to appeal to readers of any age. Here are just a few. I Can't Keep My Own Secrets Six-Word Memoirs By Teens Famous and Obscure Edited by Larry Smith and Rachel Fershleiser HarperTeen 192 pp. $8.99 paperback Try writing your truth in exactly six words.
NEWS
April 11, 2006
Authors of fiction everywhere can mop their brows and get back to making stuff up. On Friday, Justice Peter Smith of the London High Court ruled - correctly - that Da Vinci Code author Dan Brown had not infringed on copyright laws when he based aspects of his megahit on a 1982 book. Smith said the commonsense thing: Yes, Brown had based some "items" on material from Michael Baigent, Henry Lincoln and Richard Leigh's Holy Blood, Holy Grail. But such borrowings had been "at a general and low level of abstraction.
NEWS
January 16, 2006 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There I was, writing my nonfiction book, dying to switch over to fiction for just a paragraph or two. There were no Truth Police in the vicinity, and the anecdote from my life that I'd been aching to embellish was known only to me. No witnesses! I started to do it, I really did. With a little creative mendacity, the incident I wanted to amp up would have been funnier, sexier, juicier than real life. Who would know the difference? I'm remembering all this now as the country contemplates the news that author James Frey's best-selling memoir, A Million Little Pieces, contains fabricated material.
LIVING
December 13, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To review means "to see again," and to review 2009 means to see again a lot of great books and a lot of great Inquirer reviews: Nonfiction. Ours is often called an age of nonfiction, and that's the truth. Timothy Egan, one of our best nonfiction writers, published The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $27), a story of a huge fire that spawned the modern conservationist movement. Our reviewer, ecologist Rick Bass, called it "a remarkable story, filled with fantastic characters, cowardice and heroism.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Ha Jin, a Chinese American immigrant who served for six years in the People's Liberation Army, won the National Book Award for Fiction last night for Waiting (Pantheon), his novel about a man struggling over two women in his life amid the political repression of modern China. "I am deeply humbled and honored," the author, now a professor of English at Emory University in Atlanta, told the publishing-industry crowd gathered in the ballroom of the Marriott Marquis Hotel. The surprise winner, who came to the United States in 1985, reserved his strongest thanks "above all, to the English language, which has provided me a niche where I can do meaningful work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe it was just the way the cards fell this year. Still, it does stick out. In some sectors, the National Book Award is better regarded than the Pulitzer. Panels of five respected judges are assembled for fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people's literature. They draw up "long lists" of 10 books (an innovation begun last year). A long list is a nice thing, a way of honoring a group of high achievers. A short list follows, and then the award itself. The long list in nonfiction for 2014 came out on Sept.
NEWS
January 1, 2007 | By Jason Zuzga
This is the fifth in our traditional year-end series of commissioned poems based on recent Inquirer headlines. The article headlined "13 states join to sue EPA to lower levels of soot" appeared Tuesday, Dec. 19, on Page A4. Today we are growing extinction like a marigold seed in a polystyrene cup: Roots reach down. 13 states stand up. Soot pollens froth from the tubes like a pre-cabled television screen; the fine coal points scramble weightless in the trees and lungs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2009
Book lovers will be able to read by literary star light this fall, as new works from some of the biggest names in publishing appear on bookstore shelves. In the fiction section, the novel Homer & Langley is just out from E.L. Doctorow. Following later this month will be offerings from Margaret Atwood, Pete Dexter, and Nick Hornby. October will bring new works by Michael Connelly, Jonathan Lethem, John Irving, and Augusten Burroughs. Philip Roth and Barbara Kingsolver return in November, and Sue Grafton will near the end of the alphabet in December when she reaches the letter "U. " Memoirs will loom large on the nonfiction shelves as the late Edward M. Kennedy, Serena Williams, Michael Chabon, and Andre Agassi weigh in. Also coming: Works about Barack and Michelle Obama, NFL star/Army ranger Pat Tillman, Elizabeth Taylor, and the late Queen Mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1986 | By Richard Fuller, Special to the Inquirer
The western may be dead in the movies, but it sure isn't in a mammoth (954 pages) novel called Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry (Pocket, $4.95). Lonesome Dove is not a person but a small Texas spot where "the sun had the town trapped deep in dust, far out in the chaparral flats, a heaven for snakes and horned toads, roadrunners and stinging lizards. " It isn't heaven for a rattler when we pick up this tale: On the first page, a couple of pigs are tearing up the snake, on the porch yet. Capt.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe it was just the way the cards fell this year. Still, it does stick out. In some sectors, the National Book Award is better regarded than the Pulitzer. Panels of five respected judges are assembled for fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people's literature. They draw up "long lists" of 10 books (an innovation begun last year). A long list is a nice thing, a way of honoring a group of high achievers. A short list follows, and then the award itself. The long list in nonfiction for 2014 came out on Sept.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she was 8 or 9, in the 1960s, Jen Bryant learned to type by copying obituary material on the desk of her father, a Flemington, N.J., undertaker. In 2004, having already published more than a dozen books, she happened on a painting at the Brandywine River Museum by Horace Pippin, the late African American artist from West Chester. Bookend events. From her first childhood taste of writing to her latest children's book, A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin, published by Alfred A. Knopf in January.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll
You need not be a neurologist to know that habit and memory are connected. If you can't remember something today that you did yesterday, it won't be habit-forming tomorrow. I wonder about that connection because of a curious recurring experience I had over the past year. I should first note that at my incredibly fortunate age of 87, many of my habits are as strong today as they were when they began in my youth. As an example of a habit's long-distance vigor, I still keep my shoes shined as I did for an Army sergeant's inspections when I was 18 and in basic infantry training during World War II. Settling into adulthood, I developed habits just as durable.
NEWS
September 11, 2011
You've done your beach reading; now it's time to brush off the sand, go inside, and curl up in a cozy chair with some of fall's best offerings. Do love and marriage really go together like a horse and carriage? Pulitzer-winning novelist Jeffrey Eugenides takes a mordant look at matrimony in The Marriage Plot . A slew of other notable novelists weigh in with new work, too, including Haruki Murakami, Russell Banks, Amitav Ghosh, Don DeLillo, and Stephen King. On the nonfiction side, Mark Bowden, who chronicled a shooting war in Black Hawk Down , turns to cyber-conflict in Worm: The First Digital World War . Best-selling author Joe McGinniss tells us all about Sarah Palin in The Rogue , Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. leads us on a tour of African American history, Life Upon These Shores , and historian Ian Kershaw recounts the last days of the Third Reich in The End: The Defiance and Destruction of Hitler's Germany, 1944-1945 . Autobiographies abound, with memoirs from luminaries including Riccardo Muti, Joan Didion, Carrie Fisher, Diane Keaton, Harry Belafonte, and Roger Ebert.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
The Amazing Story Behind the Most Audacious Heist in History By Ben Mezrich Doubleday. 308 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Ben Tarnoff In the summer of 2002, three young NASA employees stole a quarter-pound of moon rocks and tried selling them online to a Belgian collector. He alerted the FBI, and together they orchestrated the sting that led to the robbers' arrest. The rocks were returned - lunar samples from the Apollo missions, valued in the vicinity of $20 million - and the ringleader, 25-year-old Thad Roberts, went to prison for eight years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
DEAR TattFans, We know, we know. Every time you picked up the Saturday paper, it was stained with your tears because you simply missed us too much. We totally get it. We missed you on the weekends, too. But starting today, Lady Tattle will be holding it down weekendwise, giving you all the celeb news you'd been sorely missing. Love, The Tattle Team Raising Kane Larry Kane is getting back into the local TV news business. But this time it might kill him. Kane, an almost constant presence in Philly's local news scene before his retirement in 2002, self-published his first novel, Death by Deadline , as an ebook earlier this week.
NEWS
January 12, 2010 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A woman picking at bones in the dirt . . . sexy stuff for a book? Could be . . . if that woman helped midwife an entire new understanding of the history of life. That's the warm heart of Tracy Chevalier's new book, Remarkable Creatures. She comes to the Free Library tonight at 7:30 for a free reading. In what is often called an era of great nonfiction, Chevalier renders true stories into truer-than-fact fiction. Her 1999 novel Girl With a Pearl Earring has had successful lives as book, play and film.
LIVING
December 13, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To review means "to see again," and to review 2009 means to see again a lot of great books and a lot of great Inquirer reviews: Nonfiction. Ours is often called an age of nonfiction, and that's the truth. Timothy Egan, one of our best nonfiction writers, published The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $27), a story of a huge fire that spawned the modern conservationist movement. Our reviewer, ecologist Rick Bass, called it "a remarkable story, filled with fantastic characters, cowardice and heroism.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2009 | By Katie Haegele FOR THE INQUIRER
Ah, fall. The season of spookiness, of football, and of leaf-peeping is about to give way to the interminable holidays, but readers of young adult books can hold onto autumn a little longer. The ever-growing genre continues to turn out interesting books, and this season gives us tons of new titles to be excited about: nonfiction on surprising topics, and novels nuanced enough to appeal to readers of any age. Here are just a few. I Can't Keep My Own Secrets Six-Word Memoirs By Teens Famous and Obscure Edited by Larry Smith and Rachel Fershleiser HarperTeen 192 pp. $8.99 paperback Try writing your truth in exactly six words.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2009 | By Michael D. Shaffer, Inquirer books editor and John Timpane
Book lovers will be able to read by literary star light this fall, as new works from some of the biggest names in publishing appear on bookstore shelves. In the fiction section, the novel Homer & Langley is just out from E.L. Doctorow. Following later this month will be offerings from Margaret Atwood, Pete Dexter, and Nick Hornby. October will bring new works by Michael Connelly, Jonathan Lethem, John Irving, and Augusten Burroughs. Philip Roth and Barbara Kingsolver return in November, and Sue Grafton will near the end of the alphabet in December when she reaches the letter "U. " Memoirs will loom large on the nonfiction shelves as the late Edward M. Kennedy, Serena Williams, Michael Chabon, and Andre Agassi weigh in. Also coming: Works about Barack and Michelle Obama, NFL star/Army ranger Pat Tillman, Elizabeth Taylor, and the late Queen Mother.
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