CollectionsNoodles
IN THE NEWS

Noodles

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
July 21, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 2 servings 3 tablespoons cooking oil 4 ounces ground pork 2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine (see note) 1 teaspoon sweet fermented sauce 1 teaspoon light soy sauce Salt 7 ounces dried Chinese wheat flour noodles or 11 ounces fresh noodles For the sauce: 3/4 cup chicken stock 2 teaspoons light soy sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon Chinkiang vinegar (see note) 2 to 4 tablespoons chili oil with its sediment, to taste 4 tablespoons finely sliced spring onion greens 5 tablespoons Sichaunese ya cai (or sub Tianjin preserved vegetable, instead, see note)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Lucky Choi is another new restaurant at an old Chinatown spot, and while the decor certainly won't win any awards, the food has something going for it. The present owners have revamped the place somewhat, doing away with the booths that once lined the northern wall. (Now if they could do something about the carpeting. . . . ) Most of the dining-room tables are round, large, and equipped with Lazy- Susan centers for family-style dining. Lucky Choi offers chow mein, chop suey and lo mein dishes, but seems to be patterning itself after a Washington restaurant that's known for its noodle dishes and dim sum. This brings it some innovative tastes with nuances of Cambodian and Taiwanese cooking.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
To find a location that provides breakfast, pasta and ice cream under one roof, you'd normally have to go to a shopping mall. At Noodles in Chestnut Hill, they're all in one restaurant. Housed in the defunct Primarily Pasta store, Noodles is the latest effort in the burgeoning food empire of Paul Roller. This bright and casual (two Roller trademarks) place is small and it's already a hit with the locals so there's a wait during peak times. But everything is available for takeout if you're in a hurry.
FOOD
February 11, 1987 | By NATALIE HOUGHTON, Los Angeles Daily News
This is one of those stories that came about by happenstance - the result of being served a cabbage salad not long ago that contained interesting crunch. Surprisingly, the crunch was from those instant, uncooked noodles that come in packages of Oriental noodle soup mix. If you've cruised the supermarket aisles, you know the mixes: the ones that often offered four or five packages for a dollar, that you keep squirreled away on the pantry shelf because they make quick, easy lunches or snacks.
FOOD
May 20, 2013
First came the hand-drawn vermicelli, then the soup dumplings, bubble tea, and ramen. Philly's Chinatown has been slowly but surely acquiring a number of Asian street foods that are the stuff of obsession elsewhere. The latest arrivals, popularized by Xi'an Famous Foods in New York, are these Xi'an liang pi noodles at the two-month-old Happy Noodle Bar on Race Street. Yes, the Chinese "burger" might catch more eyes, its zesty minced pork and chiles sandwiched between what looks like a Chinese English muffin.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1988 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
Once upon a time, some funny-looking little Japanese cars started appearing around the country. They were cheap and quickly became best-sellers. And U.S. automakers laughed, until they cried. A few years back, a Japanese dry soup with funny-looking noodles started appearing on supermarket shelves, right next to the All-American, red-and- white-labeled Campbell's condensed and Chunky soups. But Campbell Soup is determined not to suffer the fate of American automakers by allowing the Japanese to grab a significant chunk of its business.
FOOD
May 7, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The Glorious Noodle (Poseidon Press, $16.95) is a worldwide tour of noodle eating, as enjoyed from California to the Orient. It is also a trip back in time with some historical foods enjoyed by such ancients as the Etruscans. Author Linda Merinoff, a journalist, caterer and candy-maker, has included some informative history and interesting lore that shows the noodle's role as a staple of mankind. Her book has more than 200 recipes, as commonplace as cold noodles in a sesame sauce and as offbeat as a dessert made with chocolate noodles.
FOOD
April 29, 2016
Makes 2-3 servings For the noodles: 1 small head cauliflower 11/2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted Generous pinch of salt 4 ounces soba noodles Generous 1/4 cup raw macadamia nuts For the dressing: 1 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled, grated (about 1/2 teaspoon) 2 garlic cloves, peeled 1 tablespoon rice vinegar (unseasoned) 1 tablespoon sesame oil 1 tablespoon miso paste (I used brown-rice miso, but any will do) 1 teaspoon low-sodium tamari or soy sauce 1/2 teaspoon honey 1/2 cup cilantro 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment or a Silpat.
SPORTS
February 15, 1992 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER OLYMPICS BUREAU
"Noodles" - that infamous, treacherous, slippery, dangerous, exciting, awful bump that sent four women careering to the hospital this week - is still part of the women's downhill ski course. But thanks to Thursday's heavy snowfall and some modern technology, the skiers have learned to master it. At least that's what they were saying yesterday. Thirty-seven downhill racers cruised down Roc de Fer, the mile-and-two- thirds course here, and all 37 made it down without incident.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer
Anybody who frequents the supermarket knows that even imported pasta costs only about 80 cents a pound, and that explains how Noodles in Chestnut Hill keeps its prices so reasonable. And the restaurant even makes its own. If you can deal with the often ditsy help, tiny tables and spine-stiffening chairs, you will enjoy great food made from fresh ingredients and herbs. Your kids will love it even more: spaghetti and an ice cream counter - who could ask for anything more? Noodles, part of the Paul Roller triumvirate that includes Flying Fish and Roller's, is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner six days a week.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 21, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 2 servings 3 tablespoons cooking oil 4 ounces ground pork 2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine (see note) 1 teaspoon sweet fermented sauce 1 teaspoon light soy sauce Salt 7 ounces dried Chinese wheat flour noodles or 11 ounces fresh noodles For the sauce: 3/4 cup chicken stock 2 teaspoons light soy sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon Chinkiang vinegar (see note) 2 to 4 tablespoons chili oil with its sediment, to taste 4 tablespoons finely sliced spring onion greens 5 tablespoons Sichaunese ya cai (or sub Tianjin preserved vegetable, instead, see note)
FOOD
April 29, 2016
Makes 2-3 servings For the noodles: 1 small head cauliflower 11/2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted Generous pinch of salt 4 ounces soba noodles Generous 1/4 cup raw macadamia nuts For the dressing: 1 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled, grated (about 1/2 teaspoon) 2 garlic cloves, peeled 1 tablespoon rice vinegar (unseasoned) 1 tablespoon sesame oil 1 tablespoon miso paste (I used brown-rice miso, but any will do) 1 teaspoon low-sodium tamari or soy sauce 1/2 teaspoon honey 1/2 cup cilantro 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment or a Silpat.
FOOD
April 8, 2016
Guess from these photos where restaurant critic Craig LaBan ate this week. (Answers below.) 1. "Kaninchen Bandnudeln" beer-braised rabbit over ribbon noodles with gremolata 2. Chapulines grasshopper mini-tacos with pipian 3. Iberico pork Wellington For a fresh serving of Craig's Crumb Tracker quiz, join him 2 p.m. Tuesdays on his online chat: inquirer.com/ labanchats Answers: 1. Brauhaus Schmitz (718 South St.)...
FOOD
March 25, 2016
Makes 4 servings, about 1 pound 11/4 cups semolina (durum wheat) flour, plus more for sprinkling 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 3 extra-large eggs 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more for the cooking water 1. To mix the pasta by hand: Measure the flours into a bowl and whisk to combine. Dump the mixture onto a clean work surface to create a mound. Make a wide well in the center. Break the eggs into the well and add the oil and salt.
FOOD
January 28, 2016
Makes 6 servings 1 large red onion 2 thumb-size pieces of ginger, peeled and sliced into matchsticks 2-3 garlic cloves 2 stalks of lemongrass, pounded with a rolling pin to release flavors, and cut into 2-inch segments 2 teaspoons olive oil 5 cups vegetable or chicken stock 1/2 pound rice noodles 1 to 11/2 pounds jumbo shrimp or prawns, shelled and deveined 2 tablespoons tamari Juice of ½ lime 1 tablespoon...
FOOD
November 20, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Food Critic
  When Tyler Akin opened Stock in 2014, the reaction from many - myself included - was that his no-shortcut, MSG-free pho counter in Fishtown was good. But it wasn't quite the next-level bowl I'd expected from the former Zahav cook. Plus, Philly already had lots of great Vietnamese cooking to compete with. Well, Akin's menu has now ventured well beyond the borders of Vietnam to other parts of Southeast Asia, from Burma (try the cold "wife's noodles") to Cambodia (the addictive prahok katee pork dip)
NEWS
November 1, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
It can be a risky proposition to name a restaurant after a single dish. Because that dish had better be good. And so on cue, as though to illustrate the pitfalls of the proverb, the stylish new Chinese restaurant called DanDan serves a version of its namesake noodle dish that is decidedly . . . so-so. What's frustrating is that DanDan, in so many other ways, is a welcome dose of authentic Sichuan and Taiwanese flavors near Rittenhouse Square, with a sharp contemporary space, ambitious owners, and the potential to become an adventurous new favorite in a posh zip code that can always benefit from a little more earthy spice.
FOOD
August 28, 2015
Slippery and savory, this unusual combination of ingredients - Italian pasta, Asian elements, store-bought cabbage/coleslaw mix, and lime juice - works surprisingly well when you're up for just a bit of cooking and a light meal on a warm summer night. Basil-Cilantro Noodles 4 servings, plus leftovers   Kosher salt 12-ounces dried whole- grain linguine 1/2 medium onion 1 large clove garlic One 1-inch piece fresh ginger root 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 2 cups shredded cabbage or coleslaw mix 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 2 limes Small handful cilantro, plus more for garnish Small handful basil, plus a few leaves for garnish 1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil.
FOOD
July 24, 2015 | Craig LaBan
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of July 21, 2015: Reader: Have you had a chance to eat at Rex 1516 since Justin Swain has been cooking there? There's a great rotating burger for $15, and a really good old fashioned. That stretch of South Street has come a long way. (RIP Ron's Ribs.) Craig LaBan: Yes! I've definitely been back. Wrote about Swain's burger talents in January. Rex should definitely be on any burger-lover's tour of Philly. And South Street West has come a long way . . . but it's still got plenty of room to grow until it's producing the kind of sophisticated restaurants East Passyunk is. I'm excited to see the new taqueria from the Hawthornes folks.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
They say one healthy choice leads to another. So it seemed fitting that I discovered a health-food store on the way home from my new gym. The store is Health & Harmony, and to pass through its doors is to enter the rabbit hole of rabbit food. I don't mean Kashi cereal or that Greek yogurt John Stamos sells. Uncle Jesse is for amateurs. This was some next-level, Goop.com kind of stuff. The dairy aisle isn't hemmed in by the confines of a cow. There's almond milk, coconut milk, soy milk, Tofutti cream cheese, anything but milk from a mammal.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|