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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Lucky Choi is another new restaurant at an old Chinatown spot, and while the decor certainly won't win any awards, the food has something going for it. The present owners have revamped the place somewhat, doing away with the booths that once lined the northern wall. (Now if they could do something about the carpeting. . . . ) Most of the dining-room tables are round, large, and equipped with Lazy- Susan centers for family-style dining. Lucky Choi offers chow mein, chop suey and lo mein dishes, but seems to be patterning itself after a Washington restaurant that's known for its noodle dishes and dim sum. This brings it some innovative tastes with nuances of Cambodian and Taiwanese cooking.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
To find a location that provides breakfast, pasta and ice cream under one roof, you'd normally have to go to a shopping mall. At Noodles in Chestnut Hill, they're all in one restaurant. Housed in the defunct Primarily Pasta store, Noodles is the latest effort in the burgeoning food empire of Paul Roller. This bright and casual (two Roller trademarks) place is small and it's already a hit with the locals so there's a wait during peak times. But everything is available for takeout if you're in a hurry.
FOOD
February 11, 1987 | By NATALIE HOUGHTON, Los Angeles Daily News
This is one of those stories that came about by happenstance - the result of being served a cabbage salad not long ago that contained interesting crunch. Surprisingly, the crunch was from those instant, uncooked noodles that come in packages of Oriental noodle soup mix. If you've cruised the supermarket aisles, you know the mixes: the ones that often offered four or five packages for a dollar, that you keep squirreled away on the pantry shelf because they make quick, easy lunches or snacks.
FOOD
May 20, 2013
First came the hand-drawn vermicelli, then the soup dumplings, bubble tea, and ramen. Philly's Chinatown has been slowly but surely acquiring a number of Asian street foods that are the stuff of obsession elsewhere. The latest arrivals, popularized by Xi'an Famous Foods in New York, are these Xi'an liang pi noodles at the two-month-old Happy Noodle Bar on Race Street. Yes, the Chinese "burger" might catch more eyes, its zesty minced pork and chiles sandwiched between what looks like a Chinese English muffin.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1988 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
Once upon a time, some funny-looking little Japanese cars started appearing around the country. They were cheap and quickly became best-sellers. And U.S. automakers laughed, until they cried. A few years back, a Japanese dry soup with funny-looking noodles started appearing on supermarket shelves, right next to the All-American, red-and- white-labeled Campbell's condensed and Chunky soups. But Campbell Soup is determined not to suffer the fate of American automakers by allowing the Japanese to grab a significant chunk of its business.
FOOD
May 7, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The Glorious Noodle (Poseidon Press, $16.95) is a worldwide tour of noodle eating, as enjoyed from California to the Orient. It is also a trip back in time with some historical foods enjoyed by such ancients as the Etruscans. Author Linda Merinoff, a journalist, caterer and candy-maker, has included some informative history and interesting lore that shows the noodle's role as a staple of mankind. Her book has more than 200 recipes, as commonplace as cold noodles in a sesame sauce and as offbeat as a dessert made with chocolate noodles.
SPORTS
February 15, 1992 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER OLYMPICS BUREAU
"Noodles" - that infamous, treacherous, slippery, dangerous, exciting, awful bump that sent four women careering to the hospital this week - is still part of the women's downhill ski course. But thanks to Thursday's heavy snowfall and some modern technology, the skiers have learned to master it. At least that's what they were saying yesterday. Thirty-seven downhill racers cruised down Roc de Fer, the mile-and-two- thirds course here, and all 37 made it down without incident.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer
Anybody who frequents the supermarket knows that even imported pasta costs only about 80 cents a pound, and that explains how Noodles in Chestnut Hill keeps its prices so reasonable. And the restaurant even makes its own. If you can deal with the often ditsy help, tiny tables and spine-stiffening chairs, you will enjoy great food made from fresh ingredients and herbs. Your kids will love it even more: spaghetti and an ice cream counter - who could ask for anything more? Noodles, part of the Paul Roller triumvirate that includes Flying Fish and Roller's, is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner six days a week.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Pity the poor copywriter who was assigned to come up with a catchy, all- purpose description for Juzo Itami's Tampopo and settled in defeat for "the first Japanese noodle western. " It may herald a new movie genre, but it hardly does justice to a delightful, haphazard comedy that is so Eastern in its viewpoint. Then again, what do you say about a movie that argues persuasively that there is no distinction between food and sex - except to claim that there are far more sensory thrills to be derived from the former - and uses the symphonies of Gustav Mahler to accompany the pursuit of the perfect noodle?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
When people familiar with Chinese food hear the word Szechuan, they instinctively think hot-and-spicy. They might envision a good selection of stir-fries at the mention of Cantonese foods, or sweet-and-sour specialties if someone says Hunan. But what would they expect of a restaurant called the Taiwan Noodle House? Well, noodles of course. But how would the noodles be prepared? And what would set Taiwanese cooking apart from the cuisines of the various Chinese provinces? "First of all," says Ma-Ni Kam, "Taiwanese food is made for Taiwanese tastes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 24, 2015 | Craig LaBan
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of July 21, 2015: Reader: Have you had a chance to eat at Rex 1516 since Justin Swain has been cooking there? There's a great rotating burger for $15, and a really good old fashioned. That stretch of South Street has come a long way. (RIP Ron's Ribs.) Craig LaBan: Yes! I've definitely been back. Wrote about Swain's burger talents in January. Rex should definitely be on any burger-lover's tour of Philly. And South Street West has come a long way . . . but it's still got plenty of room to grow until it's producing the kind of sophisticated restaurants East Passyunk is. I'm excited to see the new taqueria from the Hawthornes folks.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
They say one healthy choice leads to another. So it seemed fitting that I discovered a health-food store on the way home from my new gym. The store is Health & Harmony, and to pass through its doors is to enter the rabbit hole of rabbit food. I don't mean Kashi cereal or that Greek yogurt John Stamos sells. Uncle Jesse is for amateurs. This was some next-level, Goop.com kind of stuff. The dairy aisle isn't hemmed in by the confines of a cow. There's almond milk, coconut milk, soy milk, Tofutti cream cheese, anything but milk from a mammal.
NEWS
October 5, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Frein is surviving in the woods by eating cans of tuna fish and ramen noodles, police said Friday. But they say they believe his food supply is dwindling, and that with Frein's diminishing resources and the weather beginning to chill, they will soon be able to catch the self-styled survivalist. "I'm more confident than ever that he's stressed," State Police Lt. Col. George Bivens said. "It's only a matter of time. " At a 25-minute news briefing Friday afternoon, Bivens offered few new details on the three-week-old manhunt for Frein, who is accused of killing one state trooper and injuring another in a Sept.
FOOD
January 3, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Michael Solomonov was cooking at Striped Bass a decade ago, his pastrami-spiced gravlax was something of a novelty. Today, though, the smoky, briny, spicy preparation is being applied to just about everything, from the brisket with pastrami jus at Sbraga to pastrami-smoked chioggia beets at Vedge. That's no coincidence. Flavors from the old-school Jewish deli - think rye bread, bagel toppings, and a schmear of schmaltz - are among the food trends expected to bubble to the top in 2014, according to forecasters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
A version of this review appeared in the Shore Dining Guide. Revel survived the hurricane but has been under water of a different sort - a bankruptcy it emerged from in May. Of course I knew Revel had issues last year when, during my review of the new casino's restaurants, I shook my head at the lack of an Asian noodle bar. Coincidence that a noodle bar, Yuboka, was one of the first new orders of business? I think not. It may surprise some that Jose Garces has been tapped to run it. But he does have some Asian experience with Chifa, and the sectioned-off platform of raised counter seats, set between the gambling floor and Amada, is already a bustling hub of noodle-slurping and steamer-basket feasts.
FOOD
May 20, 2013
First came the hand-drawn vermicelli, then the soup dumplings, bubble tea, and ramen. Philly's Chinatown has been slowly but surely acquiring a number of Asian street foods that are the stuff of obsession elsewhere. The latest arrivals, popularized by Xi'an Famous Foods in New York, are these Xi'an liang pi noodles at the two-month-old Happy Noodle Bar on Race Street. Yes, the Chinese "burger" might catch more eyes, its zesty minced pork and chiles sandwiched between what looks like a Chinese English muffin.
FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
I try to buy produce locally and cook it seasonally. But there comes a time in late winter-early spring when I can't bear to roast another Brussels sprout, bake another sweet potato, or massage another leaf of kale into submission. That's when I buy broccoli grown who knows where and transported to my friendly neighborhood Whole Foods Market. Call it a bridge to the days of peas and asparagus. Once I get it home, I usually douse it with curry powder and roast it, or microwave it and finish it under the broiler.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013
OF ALL THE topics that diners tend to fuss over, "authenticity" is the fussiest to understand. Just listen to one of the food scene's more talented over-thinkers run a restaurant through his or her analytical atom smasher and you might agree. The quantitative critiques - service, prices, vibe - are all there, but things get weird once culinary credibility undergoes cross-examination. Is it "authentic" to use this sauce? In that soup, is marjoram an "authentic" garnish? Was the pot used to braise tonight's pork wrapped in indigenous leaves, buried beneath loose earth and gently attended by a pitmaster with Taíno ancestry?
FOOD
March 7, 2013
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat from March 5: Craig LaBan: What's been making your dinners, drinks, and snacks happy? My new invention to keep the kids from fighting at dinner? Personal nachos! Made these babies to order - chili for some, black beans for others, hold the salsa, heavy on the cheese - all a hit thanks to those addictive, amazing fresh chips from Tortilleria San Roman in the Italian Market. Are they the best chips on earth? ¡Creo que sí!
FOOD
January 31, 2013 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
These noodles are a fun and approachable dish good for a busy weeknight or to celebrate Chinese New Year.   Shrimp and Shiitake Noodle Stir-Fry   Makes 4 servings 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1 small sweet onion, sliced 7 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, thinly sliced 1 red bell pepper, cored and thinly sliced 91/2-ounce package thick Asian-style noodles, such as udon ...
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