CollectionsNorm Abram
IN THE NEWS

Norm Abram

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 12, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Norm Abram is no longer This Old Sidekick. In the seven years since former host Bob Vila left PBS's "This Old House," Abram, 45, the master carpenter whose on-screen relationship with Vila clearly inspired much of the "Tool Time" dynamic on ABC's "Home Improvement," has moved out from under his former role. The flannel shirts and beard remain, but gone is the tension many viewers sensed between Vila and Abram, the feeling that one was grabbing all the glory while the other did all the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1992 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
What does every weekend woodworker need? More power! You think Home Improvement's Tim Allen is just kidding? Then drop by the Greater Philadelphia Woodworking Show today through Sunday at the Sun Center in Feltonville, Delaware County and check out reality. Wall-to-wall, state-of-the-art table saws, routers, planers, joiners, jointers, band saws, carbide-tipped saw blades, dado sets, ceramic sharpening equipment, drum sanders, extension rollers - whew. Bring your checkbook.
REAL_ESTATE
January 26, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I had no idea there was something called the Home Projects Council. For those of us who either do it ourselves or hire people who know what they're doing, the notion evokes an image of men and women in white, sitting on Mount Olympus, with Bob Vila as Zeus. "Do not add a sunroom!" Vila thunders. Lightning flashes around a mortal wearing a T-shirt that says "Weekend Warrior," who cringes in terror while such TV home-remodeling venerables as Norm Abram nod in agreement on high.
LIVING
March 26, 1993 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nesters, hear this! What you might need to improve your home or your yard or make your little corner of the world more comfy is on display at the Suburban Home and Patio Show at the Fort Washington Expo Center through Sunday. There are bubbling garden fountains and ponds, whirlpool baths and outdoor spas, hand-carved furniture, power-washing equipment, gardening supplies, sheds, Victorian playhouses, brass appointments, lace curtains and outdoor swing sets. Then there are the celebrities: Norm Abram, of TV's This Old House, will answer all your woodworking questions; and Corbin Bernsen, L.A. Law's legal heartthrob, will appear in a dining room custom-designed for him. More than 400 businesses will strut their wares at the show in the new 166,000-square-foot expo center.
LIVING
November 15, 1996 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Two magazines sit side-by-side in the supermarket rack. On the cover of one is the smiling face of America's best-known home-improvement guru. Behind him is a lovely Victorian cottage with an attractive woman tending a beautiful garden filled with petunias and impatiens. On the cover of the other are two similarly familiar faces, armed with fishing gear and standing in water in poses reminiscent of Neptune. Which would you choose? Some folks would take the plunge with fishermen Steve Thomas and Norm Abram, cohosts of This Old House, the venerable PBS show watched by more than 10 million Americans each week.
LIVING
March 1, 1996 | By Alan J. Heavens. INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
In Philadelphia, it's possible to have breakfast with Bob Vila, lunch with Norm Abram, snack with the Furniture Guys and dine with Dean and Robin. This is the world of do-it-yourself television. Almost 20 years ago, Boston public television producer Russell Morash paired contractor Vila and carpenter Abram (who had built Morash's garage) and proceeded to cash in on the home-restoration frenzy with This Old House. In 1986, Minnesotan Dean Johnson arrived on the scene with the first of his four TV "wives" - Adrienne Rogers - on Hometime, produced by WHYY-TV (Channel 12)
NEWS
May 20, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
It seems like only yesterday that master carpenter Norm Abram began appearing solo on public television as host of The New Yankee Workshop. But time flies, and the affable fellow from Massachusetts who offers us "measured drawerings" of the varied woodworking projects he expertly executes in 28 minutes each week has begun taping the show's 16th season, to air this fall. To mark the 15th anniversary of the show this month, Abram reached back into the vault and found some relatively uncomplicated, weekend-length-plus projects even folks with a limited number of tools can handle.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1986 | By ROBYN SCHAUFFELE SELVIN, Special to the Daily News
Bob Vila, charismatic host of PBS' "This Old House," has become an American folk hero as the can-do man of the 1980s. Energetic, enthusiastic, accessible, Vila draws wellwishers and fans like rock stars attract grouples. On a recent visit to Philadelphia to publicize his new book, "This Old House Guide to Building and Remodeling Materials" (Warner Books, $16.95), he received a typical welcome: Two members of an office building's carpentry staff - tipped to his arrival - were hanging out at the elevator just to say "hello.
LIVING
October 14, 1994 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's been called the most famous carpenter since Joseph and the guru of home improvement. Norm Abram, the amiable carpenter star of public television's This Old House, has for 15 years made a dovetailed joint look so easy that any average Joe or Jane could pick up a tool and do it, too. It is a talent that has helped propel This Old House into position as the most popular half-hour program on public television, with 7 million people tuning...
REAL_ESTATE
February 4, 1996 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In search of new projects and a warmer climate, Steve Thomas and Norm Abram have brought PBS's This Old House to Savannah, Ga., where the dynamic duo will spend eight episodes renovating a three-story 1884 Italianate-style rowhouse. The first episode is being aired this weekend on the region's PBS outlets - WHYY-TV (Channel 12), WLVT (Channel 39) and the New Jersey Network (Channel 23 in Camden). The episodes are repeated during the week on all of the stations. "It's a really neat project," said host Thomas, who was attending the National Association of Home Builders convention in Houston last weekend.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
January 26, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I had no idea there was something called the Home Projects Council. For those of us who either do it ourselves or hire people who know what they're doing, the notion evokes an image of men and women in white, sitting on Mount Olympus, with Bob Vila as Zeus. "Do not add a sunroom!" Vila thunders. Lightning flashes around a mortal wearing a T-shirt that says "Weekend Warrior," who cringes in terror while such TV home-remodeling venerables as Norm Abram nod in agreement on high.
REAL_ESTATE
February 17, 2008 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
There's no question that Norm Abram makes things look easy, and the kitchen project he's undertaken this season on This Old House is no exception. Abram is refurbishing a 30-year-old kitchen that's close enough to his workshop to allow him to build what he needs and then install it with minimal disruption to the homeowner. It rarely goes that smoothly, of course. I could share my kitchen-building experiences with you again, but you've been saved by Arthur D. Chodoroff, director of bands and professor of music at Temple, who began building cabinets eight years ago and has several pieces of furniture to his credit.
NEWS
May 20, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
It seems like only yesterday that master carpenter Norm Abram began appearing solo on public television as host of The New Yankee Workshop. But time flies, and the affable fellow from Massachusetts who offers us "measured drawerings" of the varied woodworking projects he expertly executes in 28 minutes each week has begun taping the show's 16th season, to air this fall. To mark the 15th anniversary of the show this month, Abram reached back into the vault and found some relatively uncomplicated, weekend-length-plus projects even folks with a limited number of tools can handle.
REAL_ESTATE
March 21, 1999 | By Shelly Phillips, FOR THE INQUIRER
They didn't intend to tear the house down. That hadn't been in the plans. But when Julie and John Kay embarked on their massive Penn Valley renovation project two years ago, they wound up demolishing so much that, at one point, their 2 1/2 acres of prime real estate was devoid of everything but portions of a basement and a three-story stairway that led only to the stars. The elegant 1890 Queen Anne summer house they bought in 1997 for $479,000 had been a beloved family home, added to over the years and covered with vinyl siding.
LIVING
October 10, 1997 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
You've spent the last 18 years fixing up old houses for other people. During that time, you've taken a group of talented, everyday folk and turned them into household names. You've developed an impressive list of resources to draw on. Even your name has become part of the language. Hey, This Old House! How do you top that? For the show's creator and executive producer-director, Russ Morash, the answer was simple: Put the cast and other experts in the role of homeowners, and let them create their dream house - in 18 half-hour episodes, the first of which will debut tomorrow at 5:30 p.m. on WHYY-TV (Channel 12)
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
An entire 30 minutes devoted to crown molding. . . . A segment on how to buy small appliances. . . . Hour upon hour peeking into strangers' kitchens. . . . an afternoon watching some lady repot tulips. Settle back with your cocoa and putty knife, Philadelphians: Home & Garden Television has arrived. Watching this cable network is like viewing "Hometime" all the time. It's WHYY's Saturday afternoon How-To lineup on Tuesday nights - and Wednesday mornings, and Sunday afternoons, and Thursday after work.
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 1997 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
There were signs that this was no ordinary renovation project. The most obvious: Five subcontractors had shown up to work on the same day. This phenomenon has been recorded only twice in U.S. history - in Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1947) and in The Money Pit, the 1980s remake. There were at least four dozen people on the site, tripping over wires, stumbling over lumber, trying not to fall over one another. And ducking - behind doors, behind walls, darting behind shrubs, crouching in corners, looking like small forest creatures caught in the headlights of a speeding Mercedes.
LIVING
January 3, 1997 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
First, let's explode the myths. The New Yankee Workshop is not as big as several football fields, but a couple of smallish rooms in some guy's barn in the suburbs. One room is so crowded with finished projects that you have to inhale to walk through it. But don't breathe too deeply. The room is also filled with fumes from wood stains and polyurethane. The shop is not filled with every woodworking tool ever made. Oh sure, the miter saw has a laser cutting guide, but it's not even a compound miter saw. Most of the other equipment used on the show is homemade or jury-rigged to fit special circumstances.
LIVING
November 15, 1996 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Two magazines sit side-by-side in the supermarket rack. On the cover of one is the smiling face of America's best-known home-improvement guru. Behind him is a lovely Victorian cottage with an attractive woman tending a beautiful garden filled with petunias and impatiens. On the cover of the other are two similarly familiar faces, armed with fishing gear and standing in water in poses reminiscent of Neptune. Which would you choose? Some folks would take the plunge with fishermen Steve Thomas and Norm Abram, cohosts of This Old House, the venerable PBS show watched by more than 10 million Americans each week.
LIVING
March 8, 1996 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
They arrived by the hundreds. Some stood in line for an hour or more before they could get inside. There were groups of elderly men in baseball caps, women wearing winter coats, people in their 30s with children in tow. Most headed toward the place where their hero was being honored, running their fingers along the heavily varnished wood, nodding approvingly. They spoke to one another in whispers. "I watched him do this on two shows," Phil Weller of Port Jervis, N.Y., told a middle-aged man nearby.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|