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Norman Bates

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Psycho III welcomes you back to the Bates Motel, where the management has a different definition of check-out time. Moviegoers accustomed to the relentless cycle of sequels to half-wit hits will rightly ask if it's worth signing the motel register for the third time. Funnily enough - and those are the operative words for the macabre, deadpan wit of this third chapter - the answer is affirmative. Most sequels are inspired by a commercial reflex, rather than valid moviemaking reasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Psycho III. " A thriller starring Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates. Featuring Diana Scarwid. Directed by Perkins from a screenplay by Charles Edward Pogue. Based on characters created by Robert Bloch. Photographed by Bruce Surtees. Edited by David Blewitt. Music by Carter Burwell. Running Time: 93 minutes. A Univesal release. In area theaters. What's a mother to do? Mrs. Bates' son, Norman, a good boy in many ways - when he isn't passing in and out of his deadly psychotic states - is back home.
LIVING
December 5, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Alfred Hitchcock's shocker Psycho was released in 1960, it was billed as "The picture you must see from the beginning - or not at all. " Director Gus Van Sant's redundant and reverential remake, virtually a scene-for-scene copy of Hitchcock's Freudian slasher, should be billed as "The picture you must see in the original - or not at all. " Like one of those taxidermic specimens preserved by Norman Bates, the creepy motel owner and...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Eighteen months before Alfred Hitchcock died in 1980, the American Film Institute held a long-overdue banquet to salute his many achievements. Before it was his turn to speak, Anthony Perkins knelt beside the chair of the visibly ill director and whispered a question. Could he tell the truth about the most famous murder scene in movies - the killing of Janet Leigh in the shower in Psycho (1960)? Could he now admit that the man wearing the wig and the dress and wielding the knife was not Perkins, who was busy doing a Broadway play when Hitchcock decided to reshoot the scene?
LIVING
October 25, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains material from the Associated Press and the Los Angeles Times
The shower curtain parts. The knife descends. The blood swirls down the drain. That scary scene in Psycho left Alfred Hitchcock's leading lady, Janet Leigh, a bath enthusiast for life. "I suddenly said to myself, 'My God, we're so vulnerable and defenseless in the shower,' " the 70-year-old actress said. "You can't hear because the water's running. You can't see. You're there and you're easy picking. " Leigh, in Glenside for a screening at the Keswick Theatre the other night of Psycho, hasn't taken a shower since madman Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* BATES MOTEL. 10 p.m. Monday, A&E.   "WE OWN a motel, Norman Bates!" crows Norma Bates (Vera Farmiga) in Monday's premiere of A&E's "Bates Motel. " What could possibly go wrong? I spent decades avoiding "Psycho" - so that I could continue to take showers - and even I knew the answer to that one. I finally broke down last weekend and borrowed the 1960 classic from my amused, Hitchcock-loving son, who's never quite understood why "The Birds" traumatized me as a child.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Believe it or not, The Running Man reached the screen through the efforts of a first-time producer who made his money manufacturing wheelchairs. The movie, which took over the top spot from Fatal Attraction at the box office last weekend, is based on a short story written by one Richard Bachman in 1962. George Linder bought the rights to it back then, recalling that he was so thrilled by the idea that "I felt like I found a Rembrandt in K mart. " But he had to wait a while. Three years ago, the real Richard Bachman came forward.
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Edge of Sanity serves as both the title of a truly despicable film and an accurate psychiatric assessment of the people responsible for creating it. The movie, which crept into the Midtown yesterday with deservedly little advance publicity, is a perverse retelling of the story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. It has nothing to add to the many superior films inspired by Robert Louis Stevenson's brilliant premise and much to subtract from the reputations of everyone involved. The key participant, of course, is Anthony Perkins.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | The Associated Press, US magazine, USA Today, the New York Daily News, the New York Post and TV Guide contributed to this report
A LONG TREK FROM 'ROOTS' It's taken a more than a decade, but LeVar Burton has finally recovered from his critically acclaimed role as Kunta Kinte, the young African slave, in the 1977 ABC mini-series "Roots. " Not ready for the money and fanfare that the role bestowed, Burton, now 31, says he spent his money and time on drugs, women and cars. "I lost touch with myself. I was behaving as if I had no control in my life," he told TV Guide. Then, he said, he discovered the powers of meditatation, yoga and fire- walking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1986 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press and United Press International contributed to this article.)
Mort Walker, who has been criticized by feminists for his slinky Miss Buxley in the comic strip "Beetle Bailey," has added a new woman to the strip. She is Sgt. Louise Lugg, "a female counterpart to Sarge," Walker said, and the first new character in a decade. Walker described Lugg, who made her debut a week ago, as "a very strong woman" in search of love and affection. Unfortunately, he said, her idea of how to get a date is "knocking a guy over the head. " Walker, who has drawn the strip for 36 years, said he'd taken a lot of flak for Miss Buxley because "nobody likes the dumb-blonde secretary type anymore.
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SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
WHEN ARCHBISHOP Wood junior Ryan Bates was in seventh grade, he decided he was finished with football for good. It was too tough, required too much running and had just stopped being fun. So, after he told his CYO coaches he was finished, Bates returned to his dad's 1999 black Ford F-150 thinking the nightmare was over. You couldn't even pay him to play. "When I got back into the truck my dad had four $100 bills," said Bates, sitting inside the team's film room on the Warminster campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* BATES MOTEL. 10 p.m. Monday, A&E.   "WE OWN a motel, Norman Bates!" crows Norma Bates (Vera Farmiga) in Monday's premiere of A&E's "Bates Motel. " What could possibly go wrong? I spent decades avoiding "Psycho" - so that I could continue to take showers - and even I knew the answer to that one. I finally broke down last weekend and borrowed the 1960 classic from my amused, Hitchcock-loving son, who's never quite understood why "The Birds" traumatized me as a child.
LIVING
December 5, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Alfred Hitchcock's shocker Psycho was released in 1960, it was billed as "The picture you must see from the beginning - or not at all. " Director Gus Van Sant's redundant and reverential remake, virtually a scene-for-scene copy of Hitchcock's Freudian slasher, should be billed as "The picture you must see in the original - or not at all. " Like one of those taxidermic specimens preserved by Norman Bates, the creepy motel owner and...
LIVING
October 25, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains material from the Associated Press and the Los Angeles Times
The shower curtain parts. The knife descends. The blood swirls down the drain. That scary scene in Psycho left Alfred Hitchcock's leading lady, Janet Leigh, a bath enthusiast for life. "I suddenly said to myself, 'My God, we're so vulnerable and defenseless in the shower,' " the 70-year-old actress said. "You can't hear because the water's running. You can't see. You're there and you're easy picking. " Leigh, in Glenside for a screening at the Keswick Theatre the other night of Psycho, hasn't taken a shower since madman Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins)
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Edge of Sanity serves as both the title of a truly despicable film and an accurate psychiatric assessment of the people responsible for creating it. The movie, which crept into the Midtown yesterday with deservedly little advance publicity, is a perverse retelling of the story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. It has nothing to add to the many superior films inspired by Robert Louis Stevenson's brilliant premise and much to subtract from the reputations of everyone involved. The key participant, of course, is Anthony Perkins.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | The Associated Press, US magazine, USA Today, the New York Daily News, the New York Post and TV Guide contributed to this report
A LONG TREK FROM 'ROOTS' It's taken a more than a decade, but LeVar Burton has finally recovered from his critically acclaimed role as Kunta Kinte, the young African slave, in the 1977 ABC mini-series "Roots. " Not ready for the money and fanfare that the role bestowed, Burton, now 31, says he spent his money and time on drugs, women and cars. "I lost touch with myself. I was behaving as if I had no control in my life," he told TV Guide. Then, he said, he discovered the powers of meditatation, yoga and fire- walking.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Believe it or not, The Running Man reached the screen through the efforts of a first-time producer who made his money manufacturing wheelchairs. The movie, which took over the top spot from Fatal Attraction at the box office last weekend, is based on a short story written by one Richard Bachman in 1962. George Linder bought the rights to it back then, recalling that he was so thrilled by the idea that "I felt like I found a Rembrandt in K mart. " But he had to wait a while. Three years ago, the real Richard Bachman came forward.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Eighteen months before Alfred Hitchcock died in 1980, the American Film Institute held a long-overdue banquet to salute his many achievements. Before it was his turn to speak, Anthony Perkins knelt beside the chair of the visibly ill director and whispered a question. Could he tell the truth about the most famous murder scene in movies - the killing of Janet Leigh in the shower in Psycho (1960)? Could he now admit that the man wearing the wig and the dress and wielding the knife was not Perkins, who was busy doing a Broadway play when Hitchcock decided to reshoot the scene?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Psycho III welcomes you back to the Bates Motel, where the management has a different definition of check-out time. Moviegoers accustomed to the relentless cycle of sequels to half-wit hits will rightly ask if it's worth signing the motel register for the third time. Funnily enough - and those are the operative words for the macabre, deadpan wit of this third chapter - the answer is affirmative. Most sequels are inspired by a commercial reflex, rather than valid moviemaking reasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Psycho III. " A thriller starring Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates. Featuring Diana Scarwid. Directed by Perkins from a screenplay by Charles Edward Pogue. Based on characters created by Robert Bloch. Photographed by Bruce Surtees. Edited by David Blewitt. Music by Carter Burwell. Running Time: 93 minutes. A Univesal release. In area theaters. What's a mother to do? Mrs. Bates' son, Norman, a good boy in many ways - when he isn't passing in and out of his deadly psychotic states - is back home.
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