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Norman Braman

SPORTS
January 18, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Leonard Tose, who owned the Eagles at the time of their only Super Bowl appearance in 1981, is hospitalized at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and has been for more than two weeks. Hospital officials, while confirming the presence of the 87-year-old Tose, would not release any information about his condition or the nature of his ailment, citing the wishes of the family. Friends who have visited the former owner there say that his health is failing. "It's up and down," former Eagles general manager Jim Murray said yesterday, shortly after leaving the hospital.
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He had it all - and lost it. But Leonard Tose, the former bon vivant and jet-setter who owned the Philadelphia Eagles, is a proud man. Though the Eagles, the Main Line mansion, the wives (five), the keep-'em-coming bottles of Dom Perignon, the helicopter, and the limos are long gone - and though he admits, "I blew it," Tose insisted: "I don't want any pity . . . . "I'm doing all right for a man of my age, 87," he said the other day in a telephone interview from the Center City hotel room that's now his home.
SPORTS
January 30, 2002 | By STAN HOCHMAN For the Daily News
LEONARD TOSE flew 762 people to New Orleans on chartered flights the year the Eagles went to the Super Bowl. He was married to Caroline then, and his guest list included her hairdresser, Mr. Vincent. It also included a comic, Don Rickles, and a cardinal, John Krol. "It's halftime," Tose recalled, rummaging in the musty attic of his memory, "and the cardinal takes me to the back of the box. He says, 'We're gonna lose,' and I say, 'Your Eminence, it's only halftime.' "And he says, 'Leonard, we don't always get what we pray for.' " Tose is 86 now, broke and battered and belligerent.
NEWS
September 9, 2001 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seven years ago, Jeffrey Lurie bought the Philadelphia Eagles for $185 million, the most ever paid for a National Football League team. It seemed absurd - who would pay top dollar for a team that hadn't won an NFL championship since the pre-Super Bowl days of 1960? Who would leverage a family fortune to buy a football franchise stuck in an economically depressed city and whose previous owners had alienated the team's fan base? Leonard Tose almost lost the Birds to gambling debts in the 1980s and threatened to move them to Phoenix.
SPORTS
August 17, 2000 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's easy to romanticize the road not taken. What if you'd married your first real love? Where would you be now if you had gone to a different college? How would things have been different if the Eagles had hired Jeff Fisher instead of Rich Kotite back on Jan. 8, 1991? "I believe I could have been successful with that team," said Fisher, who will make his return to Veterans Stadium when his Tennessee Titans play the Eagles tomorrow night. "That was a very good team. " It was. Fisher was 32 years old the day his mentor, Buddy Ryan, was fired by Norman Braman.
SPORTS
May 2, 2000 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
The "medical reject" and the rookie failure returned to end their lengthy, storied careers in Philadelphia. But why? Running back Keith Byars was a star at Ohio State whom Buddy Ryan dismissed in a radio interview the night before the draft because of a foot injury, then selected him with his first pick as Eagles coach in 1986. Byars had success with the Dolphins, Patriots and Jets after he left the Birds just before the 1993 season. Linebacker Seth Joyner, an eighth-round pick in '86 out of University of Texas-El Paso who was cut just before the season (then re-signed early in the season)
SPORTS
May 2, 2000 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wherever their distinguished NFL careers took them, Keith Byars and Seth Joyner felt like Philadelphia Eagles. "My heart stayed in Philadelphia," Byars said. "It was just my body that left. Miami, New England - I played for those teams, but I was an Eagle in my heart. " "Everywhere I go," Joyner said, "even outside the country, I run into people who remember me as a Philadelphia Eagle. When I come back here, I still got a lot of love from the fans here. They remember the good times.
SPORTS
September 23, 1999 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
Doug Flutie quarterbacking the Eagles instead of Randall Cunningham? Right now, even? An interesting tidbit in the Buffalo Bills media package this week indicates that it might have been in the works in 1985. According to Tom Coughlin, the Jacksonville Jaguars head coach, ex-Eagles owner Leonard Tose pursued the possibility of swinging a trade with Buffalo for the No. 1 pick and the opportunity to select Flutie in the '85 draft. Coughlin had coached Flutie, the 1984 Heisman Trophy winner, for three years at Boston College before joining Marion Campbell's staff as Eagles receivers coach in '84. The Eagles, with the No. 9 pick in the first round, apparently contacted Buffalo owner Ralph Wilson, expressing interest in a trade intended to land Flutie.
SPORTS
December 3, 1998 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a Philadelphia thing. Follow sports in any American city, read the columnists, and tune in the talk shows and you will encounter criticism of coaches, managers and players. Philadelphia has long had a reputation for harsher criticism than most. But there is something unique about the City of Brotherly Shove: Philadelphia hates team owners, especially the people who own its football team. The national TV eye will be on the city tonight, perhaps for the last time in a long while, when the Eagles play the St. Louis Rams.
SPORTS
November 12, 1998 | By Phil Gianficaro, FOR THE INQUIRER
Oakland cornerback Eric Allen called Reggie White, the Green Bay defensive end, after White recorded three of his 12 sacks in one game earlier this season. Minnesota quarterback Randall Cunningham called Allen after Allen was honored as the AFC defensive player of the month of October. Allen and White each called Cunningham, the NFL's top-rated passer, to congratulate him on his remarkable season. The consensus is that those former Eagles will be called not only to the playoffs but also to the Pro Bowl in a season in which the current Eagles are being called something else: pathetic.
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