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Norman Lear

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NEWS
November 30, 1991 | By Jay Sharbutt, Associated Press Inquirer wire services contributed to this report
For some producers, a new series isn't quite like a second marriage, the triumph of hope over experience. Consider Norman Lear. In the '70s, he came forth with such network hits as All in the Family and Maude, hailed then as landmarks in social sitcommentary, and Sanford and Son, Good Times and The Jeffersons. He produced some attention-getting syndicated series, too - such as Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, a takeoff on soap operas, and Fernwood 2-Night, a talk- show spoof now rerun on cable's Nick at Nite (2 a.m. weeknights)
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
*  EVEN THIS I GET TO EXPERIENCE. By Norman Lear. Penguin Press. NORMAN LEAR'S led a big life, and at 92, he's ready to talk about it. The legendary producer and activist, whose 1970s taboo-busting comedy "All in the Family" was the first in a string of Lear-produced hits that included "Maude" and "Sanford and Son," has a new project, a memoir he's called Even This I Get to Experience. "It's the first time I've written thoroughly about myself. Although I have learned in the course of the years that I was writing about myself and putting it other characters," said Lear in a phone interview Tuesday.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The title of Norman Lear's new memoir, Even This I Get to Experience , doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. What's this this the visionary creator of All in The Family and The Jeffersons gets to experience? Can we have it, too? The phrase, Lear said, is a sort of mantra. Speaking on the phone from a book-tour stop in Washington, D.C., Lear says he's been able to get through life's challenges, disappointments, and tragedies by remembering that even the worst event is an experience, an opportunity for learning, for growing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
May we all live long enough to be as happy as Norman Lear. The producer who transformed TV comedy in the 1970s with hits like All in the Family and The Jeffersons turned 94 last week, and is clearly tickled to be able to impress people just by entering a room under his own power. He does much more than that - and even sings a bit - in Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You , a charming new documentary. Lear went into therapy in his 80s as part of the process of writing his 2014 memoir, Even This I Get to Experience , and directors Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing may have benefited, too, from the ensuing excavation, which included memories of his father, a small-time criminal whose attitudes and expressions - including "Stifle!"
NEWS
June 5, 2012
THE MOST RECENT recipients of the Marian Anderson Award are actress Mia Farrow in 2011, actor and comedian Bill Cosby in 2010, author Maya Angelou and screenwriter Norman Lear in 2008, actor Richard Gere in 2007 and actor Sidney Poitier in 2006. No award was given in 2009. n
NEWS
November 18, 2008
Congratulations to Maya Angelou and Norman Lear, who shared the 10th annual Marian Anderson Award at a gala in Philadelphia last night. The award - named for the late South Philadelphia contralto who was the first African American to perform with the New York Metropolitan Opera - honors entertainers who work for social change. Angelou, 80, a poet, actress and civil rights activist, has written many plays, books and poetry. She is perhaps best known for her memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.
NEWS
May 21, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Only 25 copies of the original broadside printing of the Declaration of Independence are known to exist. One of them, owned by television producer Norman Lear, will be displayed at the National Constitution Center next weekend, Friday through Memorial Day. The opening of the display coincides with a breakfast program that the center has put together featuring David McCullough, author of the new book 1776. The Lear Declaration is one of the 25 known remaining copies of the 200 or so printed by John Dunlop of Philadelphia, who received the freshly passed document from the Continental Congress.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | LOS ANGELES TIMES
LOS ANGELES - As a top television comedy director who won an Emmy directing "The Dick Van Dyke Show" in the early 1960s, John Rich was faced with a tough choice in 1970. On the same day he received a phone call from Mary Tyler Moore wanting to set up a meeting to discuss his directing the initial episode of her new TV series, he got a call from Norman Lear who wanted to send him a script for a pilot. Rich was impressed with both scripts, but he was shocked by the "unusually explicit language" he found in Lear's offering.
NEWS
August 5, 2010
Bernie West, 92, a writer and producer on such TV shows as All in the Family, The Jeffersons , and Three's Company during a wide-ranging show-business career, died Thursday at his home in Beverly Hills of complications from Alzheimer's disease. Mr. West started as a vaudeville and nightclub performer after graduating from college and acted on stage and early television before turning to writing and producing. His television credits included Car 54, Where Are You? in 1961 and The Gary Moore Show in 1964.
NEWS
November 18, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"Maya Angelou makes me cry," the filmmaker Jonathan Demme said of the poet and co-recipient of the Marian Anderson Award, bestowed at a Kimmel Center gala last night. "And Norman Lear makes me crack up," Demme noted of Angelou's co-honoree, the TV pioneer and social activist. The event was star-studded and politically connected. Harry Belafonte, the first recipient of the award given in the name of the Philadelphia contralto who used her art in the service of social justice, sat for dinner with Demme and Judge Marjorie O. Rendell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.
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NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TV Critic
BEVERLY HILLS - When A&E's Born This Way premiered in December , what I most liked about it was that it wasn't too, too special. As the mother of a young adult who, like the show's stars, happens to have Down syndrome, I'm not a big fan of special, which so often isn't. In playing themselves on television, these mostly twentysomethings were for once having an experience their more typical peers might envy. But Born This Way (10 p.m. Tuesdays, A&E), which returned for a second season on July 26 and whose three Emmy nominations include one for outstanding unstructured reality program, is special in some ways, and its differences, says executive producer Jonathan Murray, may make it a little more real than other shows of its genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
May we all live long enough to be as happy as Norman Lear. The producer who transformed TV comedy in the 1970s with hits like All in the Family and The Jeffersons turned 94 last week, and is clearly tickled to be able to impress people just by entering a room under his own power. He does much more than that - and even sings a bit - in Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You , a charming new documentary. Lear went into therapy in his 80s as part of the process of writing his 2014 memoir, Even This I Get to Experience , and directors Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing may have benefited, too, from the ensuing excavation, which included memories of his father, a small-time criminal whose attitudes and expressions - including "Stifle!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* EMPIRE. 9 tonight, Fox 29. * ROSEWOOD. 8 tonight, Fox 29.   AMID the soap opera trappings of "Empire" - Catfight! Fatal disease misdiagnosed! Exes who can't let go! - it can be easy to forget just how subversive it is. As last season's breakout hit returns to Fox tonight, Cookie (Taraji P. Henson) is here to remind us, employing an ugly racial symbol to maximum effect in an entrance that has to be seen to be believed. And that's not the half of it. As the Lyon family stages a concert/rally to free Lucious (Terrence Howard)
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The title of Norman Lear's new memoir, Even This I Get to Experience , doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. What's this this the visionary creator of All in The Family and The Jeffersons gets to experience? Can we have it, too? The phrase, Lear said, is a sort of mantra. Speaking on the phone from a book-tour stop in Washington, D.C., Lear says he's been able to get through life's challenges, disappointments, and tragedies by remembering that even the worst event is an experience, an opportunity for learning, for growing.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
*  EVEN THIS I GET TO EXPERIENCE. By Norman Lear. Penguin Press. NORMAN LEAR'S led a big life, and at 92, he's ready to talk about it. The legendary producer and activist, whose 1970s taboo-busting comedy "All in the Family" was the first in a string of Lear-produced hits that included "Maude" and "Sanford and Son," has a new project, a memoir he's called Even This I Get to Experience. "It's the first time I've written thoroughly about myself. Although I have learned in the course of the years that I was writing about myself and putting it other characters," said Lear in a phone interview Tuesday.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Jake Pearson, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Jean Stapleton, 90, the stage-trained character actress who played Archie Bunker's far better half, the sweetly naive Edith, in the groundbreaking 1970s TV comedy All in the Family , has died. Ms. Stapleton died Friday of natural causes at her home surrounded by friends and family, her children said Saturday. Little known to the public before All In the Family , she costarred with Carroll O'Connor in the top-rated CBS sitcom about an unrepentant bigot, the wife he churlishly but fondly called "Dingbat," their daughter, Gloria (Sally Struthers)
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Frazier Moore, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Bonnie Franklin, 69, the pert, redheaded actress whom millions came to identify with for her role as divorced mom Ann Romano on the long-running sitcom One Day at a Time , died Friday at her home in Los Angeles due to complications from pancreatic cancer. Ms. Franklin was a veteran stage and television performer before One Day At a Time made her a star. Developed by Norman Lear and cocreated by Whitney Blake - herself a former sitcom star and single mother raising future actress Meredith Baxter - the series was groundbreaking for its focus on a young divorced mother seeking independence from a suffocating marriage.
NEWS
June 5, 2012
THE MOST RECENT recipients of the Marian Anderson Award are actress Mia Farrow in 2011, actor and comedian Bill Cosby in 2010, author Maya Angelou and screenwriter Norman Lear in 2008, actor Richard Gere in 2007 and actor Sidney Poitier in 2006. No award was given in 2009. n
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | LOS ANGELES TIMES
LOS ANGELES - As a top television comedy director who won an Emmy directing "The Dick Van Dyke Show" in the early 1960s, John Rich was faced with a tough choice in 1970. On the same day he received a phone call from Mary Tyler Moore wanting to set up a meeting to discuss his directing the initial episode of her new TV series, he got a call from Norman Lear who wanted to send him a script for a pilot. Rich was impressed with both scripts, but he was shocked by the "unusually explicit language" he found in Lear's offering.
NEWS
August 5, 2010
Bernie West, 92, a writer and producer on such TV shows as All in the Family, The Jeffersons , and Three's Company during a wide-ranging show-business career, died Thursday at his home in Beverly Hills of complications from Alzheimer's disease. Mr. West started as a vaudeville and nightclub performer after graduating from college and acted on stage and early television before turning to writing and producing. His television credits included Car 54, Where Are You? in 1961 and The Gary Moore Show in 1964.
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