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Norman Rockwell

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NEWS
May 4, 2005 | By LLOYD WILLIAMS
"This is the bread of affliction which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt; let all those who are hungry enter and eat thereof; and all who are in distress come and celebrate the Passover. " - The Passover Blessing NORMAN ROCKWELL (1894-1978), the quintessential illustrator of the common man, is best remembered for capturing on canvas an array of slice-of-life tableaus of 20th-century Americana. "Golden Rule," perhaps his most socially conscious creation, graced the cover of the April 1, 1961, Saturday Evening Post, a date that fell right between the start of Passover (March 31)
LIVING
October 16, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Original works by the famed Saturday Evening Post illustrator Norman Rockwell rarely appear at auction. The last one seems to have been "Breaking Home Ties," which sold in 2006 at Sotheby's for $15.4 million after being found hidden in a wall in the Vermont home of Rockwell's cartoonist friend Don Trachte. So Pook & Pook is justified in adorning the cover of the catalog for its fine-art auction next Friday with the Rockwell that is the event's highlight: "That Musical Pal of Mine," an oil-on-canvas portrait that has a presale estimate of $30,000 to $50,000, according to the illustrated catalogs, also accessible online at www.pookandpook.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It started in the 1970s with a flyer in the mail, said Robert L. D'Anjolell Sr. That was several hundred Norman Rockwell plates ago. The funeral director returned the flyer with an order for his first china plate bearing the reproduction of a Norman Rockwell illustration. The plate was one of a series, so D'Anjolell bought the series. "We just continued to add to it," D'Anjolell added, with considerable understatement. Now he has "at least 600" Norman Rockwell plates and "at least 300" figurines from such sources as the Bradford Exchange, Gorham Fine China, and River Shore Ltd. He figures that the total collection includes more than a thousand items, but he was unable to estimate its value.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It started in the 1970s with a flyer in the mail, said Robert L. D'Anjolell Sr. That was several hundred Norman Rockwell plates ago. The funeral director returned the flyer with an order for his first china plate bearing the reproduction of a Norman Rockwell illustration. The plate was one of a series, so D'Anjolell bought the series. Now he has "at least 600" Norman Rockwell plates and "at least 300" figurines from such sources as the Bradford Exchange, Gorham Fine China, and River Shore Ltd. He figures that the total collection includes more than a thousand items, but he was unable to estimate its value.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By David O'Reilly and Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITERS
The weary farmboy who once graced the cover of the Saturday Evening Post might sleep forever, but not the FBI. On Thursday - 40 years since Norman Rockwell's painting Taking a Break was stolen from a Cherry Hill home - the bureau's Art Crime Team issued a new appeal for any information related to the theft. It was one of several items taken during a June 30, 1976, break-in at the home of Robert and Teresa Grant, according to the FBI. The bureau and the Cherry Hill Police Department say they are still seeking leads, Also known as Lazybones , the 25-by-28-inch oil was featured on the cover of the Sept.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | Special to the Inquirer / JOAN FAIRMAN KANES
Sculptor Peter Rockwell, a 1958 graduate of Haverford College, is an artist-in-residence there this semester. With the help of nine student apprentices, he has been carving a "climbing sculpture" from a 5-ton block of Indiana limestone. Earlier this month, the unfinished sculpture was loaded onto a pickup and driven from the foundry to a spot near the campus library, where it was installed with the help of a crane. Rockwell, who is the son of Norman Rockwell, and his students will continue working on the statue, which was designed for children to clamber on, climb over and crawl through.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1986 | By RICK SELVIN, Daily News Staff Writer
"Say, why don't we break outta this smoky joint and go up to my place? I've got some great oil-on-velvet paintings - you know, Elvis, John Wayne, and a fabulous Sylvester Stallone - you'll love 'em. Oh well, another lonely night. Seems no one appreciates original artwork anymore. Like, just because you buy your paintings from a stand on an Exxon parking lot, doesn't make it schlock, right? What'd she mean, anyway, " 'Your taste is in your mouth, pal' "? Taste. It's all relative.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of Norman Rockwell's sons is at Haverford College these days, carving some pretty ugly stuff. When he returns to his home in Rome next month, he figures that the ugliness he will leave behind should be in pretty good company. "Philadelphia has the best stone monsters of any city in the United States," Peter Rockwell, 53, said in an interview yesterday. The ones that Rockwell is carving are on a five-ton piece of limestone that was to be moved today from the campus foundry to a permanent home alongside the campus library.
NEWS
November 23, 1999 | By David Boldt
Unlikely as it may seem to those who have accused me of being a cultural caveman, I can now claim to have been way ahead of the curve in assessing at least one artist. The hottest museum show in the country right now is "Norman Rockwell: Pictures For the American People" in Atlanta. It will travel to six other cities next year before finishing up at the Guggenheim in New York. Without surprise, considering Rockwell's immense popularity, the show is breaking attendance records.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By David O'Reilly and Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITERS
The weary farmboy who once graced the cover of the Saturday Evening Post might sleep forever, but not the FBI. On Thursday - 40 years since Norman Rockwell's painting Taking a Break was stolen from a Cherry Hill home - the bureau's Art Crime Team issued a new appeal for any information related to the theft. It was one of several items taken during a June 30, 1976, break-in at the home of Robert and Teresa Grant, according to the FBI. The bureau and the Cherry Hill Police Department say they are still seeking leads, Also known as Lazybones , the 25-by-28-inch oil was featured on the cover of the Sept.
NEWS
July 9, 2015
I WAS wrong. Bill Cosby didn't deserve the benefit of the doubt. He cheated on his wife, Camille. He cheated on his kids. He cheated on the people who fell in love with Dr. Huxtable, because they couldn't see any line of demarcation between him and his alter ego. He cheated on Philadelphia. He broke my heart. It's not as if my heart hasn't been broken before. I almost married a man who claimed to be something he was very clearly not - an honorable person. I grew up in a milieu where drinking and adultery and all the other "if it feels good do it" vices were common currency in the social market.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steven Quigley and Brett Kane were classmates at Paul VI High School in Haddon Township, graduating in 1992. They were friendly, but never close. Kane went to the College of New Jersey, moved to Boston, then back to South Jersey, married, and started a family. Quigley took a more exotic path, after Rutgers living in Israel, Bali, Japan, and Taiwan, an entrepreneur with crazy adventures and close calls, returning in 2009 to start a business in Philadelphia. They reacquainted on Facebook - casual, virtual, a photo here, a posting there.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
ALL THOSE years of speculating who was going to play Wonder Woman - everyone from Sarah Michelle Gellar to Beyonce - and who does Warner Bros. choose?   Gal Gadot . Huh? Exactly. The Israel-born actress will portray the toughest chick wearing gold bracelets in the studio's superhero team-up film with Batman ( Ben Affleck ) and Superman ( Henry Cavill ), Warner announced yesterday. Created in the 1940s and outfitted in patriotic colors, Wonder Woman was most famously played by Lynda Carter in the 1970s TV series.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My husband and I (as well as his sister and spouse) are at our wits' end. I have a great relationship with my mother-in-law. Before we had kids, we vacationed with my husband's family, and went for dinner and drinks frequently. We live within minutes of my in-laws, but do not get or ask for a lot of help. When we do ask for babysitting, we are made to feel like it is a major inconvenience. My sister-in-law gets the same response. We get a list of things she has going on that may be impacted by a few hours with her grandchildren.
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | BY LISA RATHKE AND MICHAEL HILL, Associated Press
MONTPELIER, Vt. - Don Trachte's cowlick has been tamed. Mary Hall is no longer a towhead. Butch Corbett is still thin, but not the beanpole he once was. And Tom Paquin's carrot top is thinner and grayer. Twenty or so people who were children when they posed in the 1940s and '50s for their neighbor Norman Rockwell in the Vermont town of Arlington are reuniting there Saturday to share their memories of the great American artist who once lived in their midst. Rockwell captured scenes of everyday life in his paintings and illustrations for covers of the Saturday Evening Post , for the Boy Scouts and for its publication Boys' Life , art now considered the very definition of Americana.
LIVING
October 16, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Original works by the famed Saturday Evening Post illustrator Norman Rockwell rarely appear at auction. The last one seems to have been "Breaking Home Ties," which sold in 2006 at Sotheby's for $15.4 million after being found hidden in a wall in the Vermont home of Rockwell's cartoonist friend Don Trachte. So Pook & Pook is justified in adorning the cover of the catalog for its fine-art auction next Friday with the Rockwell that is the event's highlight: "That Musical Pal of Mine," an oil-on-canvas portrait that has a presale estimate of $30,000 to $50,000, according to the illustrated catalogs, also accessible online at www.pookandpook.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
Move over, Norman Rockwell. Ellen B.T. Pyle also did her share of celebrated Saturday Evening Post covers. The American public loved her work, and Pyle (1876-1936) even received a fan letter from Rockwell. Delaware Art Museum is presenting the first overview of the career of Ellen Bernard Thompson Pyle in a show of 50 works, "Illustrating Her World. " Its book-length catalog is a page-turner. And while much of the featured artwork has been loaned by family members, it is hoped that more might come to light because of the display.
LIVING
June 15, 2007 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
The top prices at Freeman's sale of fine art June 24 are likely to go for works by Pennsylvania impressionists from Bucks County, including Daniel Garber and Fern Coppedge. But perhaps the most memorable of the 150 lots in the sale, which will begin at 2 p.m. at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St., is by an artist associated with a onetime Philadelphia institution, the Saturday Evening Post. The work, titled Charwomen in Theater, is by Norman Rockwell and depicts two cleaning ladies taking a break in the red upholstered seats of what could easily be the Academy of Music, scanning an abandoned copy of Playbill.
NEWS
May 4, 2005 | By LLOYD WILLIAMS
"This is the bread of affliction which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt; let all those who are hungry enter and eat thereof; and all who are in distress come and celebrate the Passover. " - The Passover Blessing NORMAN ROCKWELL (1894-1978), the quintessential illustrator of the common man, is best remembered for capturing on canvas an array of slice-of-life tableaus of 20th-century Americana. "Golden Rule," perhaps his most socially conscious creation, graced the cover of the April 1, 1961, Saturday Evening Post, a date that fell right between the start of Passover (March 31)
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