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Norman Rockwell Museum

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NEWS
June 26, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman Rockwell, who illustrated the traditions and humor of small-town America on magazine covers, will be remembered Friday with five commemoratives. A single 29-cent stamp features a self-portrait of the artist that appeared on the cover of a 1960 issue of the Saturday Evening Post that contained excerpts of Rockwell's autobiography. The other four stamps, each 50 cents in denomination, will be issued in a miniature sheet proclaiming freedom of speech and worship and freedom from fear and want.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | By Jack Severson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Childhood is filled with mysteries and countless questions about the world. What holds birds up in the air? How come you can't see wind? Stuff like that. One of the enduring mysteries of my early life was: If they call it the Saturday Evening Post, how come it comes in the mail on Thursday? Why isn't it the Thursday Evening Post? "The Post" was a staple in the coffee-table pile when I was growing up. But there certainly never was any mystery about the magazine's covers, so frequently bearing illustrations by Norman Rockwell.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
Our family is going to New England this summer and would like to stop by the Norman Rockwell Museum. Exactly where is it? A.B., Philadelphia Norman Rockwell lived in Stockbridge, Mass., for the last 25 years of his life, and the museum at Main and Elm Streets there has hundreds of his illustrations and paintings. The artist died in 1978. The museum opened in 1969, and a larger facility is in the works that will allow the display of more of the collection at one time. Stockbridge is in the Berkshire Mountains, about a five-hour drive from Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Brandywine Valley is Howard Pyle and Wyeth country. So accustomed are we to hearing Howard Pyle linked with the Wilmington and Chadds Ford area, it's surprising to see this late-19th century illustrator featured in a twin- bill exhibition with a generation-younger illustrator, Norman Rockwell. Delaware Art Museum is presenting this show as a more natural fit, I suppose, than Brandywine River Museum would have provided. After all, it's a question of who is the rightful heir, artistically, to Pyle, the granddaddy of American illustration.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
WHEN JERRY Pinkney was a boy growing up in Germantown, he and his siblings drew on their bedroom wall. When the kids' artwork filled the space, "My father would simply paint over it, and we'd start over again," said Pinkney. Sound like James H. and Willie Mae Pinkney were permissive parents? Nope. More like prescient. Today, Jerry Pinkney, 73, is one of our country's foremost illustrators, especially of children's books. He's painted pioneering reinterpretations of the Tales of Uncle Remus and John Henry . He's masterfully retold Aesop's fables, Bible stories, and real and fictional tales of African-American families, from slavery through today.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
An original Norman Rockwell called Lazybones (Boy Asleep With Hoe) was stolen from Robert and Teresa Grant's Cherry Hill home in 1976. The Grants are deceased, but their children still hope to recover the oil painting of a recumbent, roly-poly fellow and his slumbering pooch. And the retired FBI agent the family has asked to help is convinced that Boy hasn't gotten far in the last 37 years. "Call it instinct, or intuition, but I think the painting is still around, still local," says Robert Bazin, 73, who investigated art theft for the bureau's Philadelphia office between 1980 and 1997.
NEWS
October 2, 2005 | By Ellen B. Cutler FOR THE INQUIRER
Bullets of rain smashed against the windshield as we drove through New York on the Taconic Parkway. We were headed for Stockbridge, Mass., and the estate of sculptor Daniel Chester French. Western Massachusetts is lousy with places that I have long meant to see. There just never seemed to be the time to detour from occasional runs up Interstate 95. In June, however, the celebration of my mother's 80th birthday in Boston motivated us to schedule a short vacation. We planned stops in New York City and in Stockbridge and Amherst, Mass.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
For Marshall Stoltz, it all started many yesterdays ago with "Men of Tomorrow. " Stoltz was 11 when his father gave him and his older brother, Don, a calendar with a picture showing "a group of Scouts walking along a trail carrying a canoe. " It was titled "Men of Tomorrow. " Being Scouts themselves, "it meant something to us," Stoltz said. "We could understand it. It wasn't like a Picasso, where you say, 'What the hell is he trying to say here?' This picture we understood.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a scene that would have inspired the artist himself: In the soft light of the Norman Rockwell Museum, toiling beneath rows and rows of the artist's heartwarming paintings, seven New Jersey Boy Scouts were boxing, stacking and moving the museum's artifacts. They were members of Boy Scout Troop 50 from North Brunswick, N.J., and they had given up their Saturday afternoon to help the museum move from its current home in the lobby of the Curtis Center building, Sixth and Walnut Streets, to larger quarters in the building's renovated basement.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | by Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a medical office in Bustleton that really puts "family" into "family medicine. " It's there that Dr. Donald Stoltz, who has been watching out for the health of Northeast residents since 1961, was joined recently by his son, Dr. Bradley J. Stoltz. "It's something I've looked forward to for a long time," the senior Stoltz said. "Many fathers would like their sons to work with them in their profession or business. " The dream became a reality for him when his son completed a residency at Norristown's Suburban General Hospital and decided to work with his dad. "We get along very well," said Brad Stoltz, 29. "I feel comfortable asking questions if I'm not sure about something.
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NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
An original Norman Rockwell called Lazybones (Boy Asleep With Hoe) was stolen from Robert and Teresa Grant's Cherry Hill home in 1976. The Grants are deceased, but their children still hope to recover the oil painting of a recumbent, roly-poly fellow and his slumbering pooch. And the retired FBI agent the family has asked to help is convinced that Boy hasn't gotten far in the last 37 years. "Call it instinct, or intuition, but I think the painting is still around, still local," says Robert Bazin, 73, who investigated art theft for the bureau's Philadelphia office between 1980 and 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
WHEN JERRY Pinkney was a boy growing up in Germantown, he and his siblings drew on their bedroom wall. When the kids' artwork filled the space, "My father would simply paint over it, and we'd start over again," said Pinkney. Sound like James H. and Willie Mae Pinkney were permissive parents? Nope. More like prescient. Today, Jerry Pinkney, 73, is one of our country's foremost illustrators, especially of children's books. He's painted pioneering reinterpretations of the Tales of Uncle Remus and John Henry . He's masterfully retold Aesop's fables, Bible stories, and real and fictional tales of African-American families, from slavery through today.
NEWS
November 13, 2009 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There were hardly any malls when Norman Rockwell was painting his Saturday Evening Post covers of small-town life, domestic bliss, and unfettered patriotism. Yet somehow an exhibit that re-creates in 3D those beloved icons of the American experience seems right at home in the commercial, crowd-pleasing atmosphere of the King of Prussia mall. For Rockwell was perhaps the most crowd-pleasing of all American artists. As the movie at the start of "Rockwell's America: Celebrating the Art of Norman Rockwell" relates, his work is recognized by almost everyone in the country, and has been reproduced more than Picasso, Michelangelo, and Rembrandt . . . combined!
NEWS
October 2, 2005 | By Ellen B. Cutler FOR THE INQUIRER
Bullets of rain smashed against the windshield as we drove through New York on the Taconic Parkway. We were headed for Stockbridge, Mass., and the estate of sculptor Daniel Chester French. Western Massachusetts is lousy with places that I have long meant to see. There just never seemed to be the time to detour from occasional runs up Interstate 95. In June, however, the celebration of my mother's 80th birthday in Boston motivated us to schedule a short vacation. We planned stops in New York City and in Stockbridge and Amherst, Mass.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
For Marshall Stoltz, it all started many yesterdays ago with "Men of Tomorrow. " Stoltz was 11 when his father gave him and his older brother, Don, a calendar with a picture showing "a group of Scouts walking along a trail carrying a canoe. " It was titled "Men of Tomorrow. " Being Scouts themselves, "it meant something to us," Stoltz said. "We could understand it. It wasn't like a Picasso, where you say, 'What the hell is he trying to say here?' This picture we understood.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | By Jack Severson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Childhood is filled with mysteries and countless questions about the world. What holds birds up in the air? How come you can't see wind? Stuff like that. One of the enduring mysteries of my early life was: If they call it the Saturday Evening Post, how come it comes in the mail on Thursday? Why isn't it the Thursday Evening Post? "The Post" was a staple in the coffee-table pile when I was growing up. But there certainly never was any mystery about the magazine's covers, so frequently bearing illustrations by Norman Rockwell.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Norman Rockwell is probably the most popular illustrator America has produced. Howard Pyle, no less talented, comes in a close second because, unlike Rockwell, he created illustrations for books, not for the mass media. Pyle (1853-1911) was the first American illustrator of stature; he made the profession respectable. Rockwell (1894-1978) became an American institution through the 322 covers he created for the Saturday Evening Post. A museum exhibition that brings them together in a compare-and-contrast format seems a sure way to attract a crowd.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Brandywine Valley is Howard Pyle and Wyeth country. So accustomed are we to hearing Howard Pyle linked with the Wilmington and Chadds Ford area, it's surprising to see this late-19th century illustrator featured in a twin- bill exhibition with a generation-younger illustrator, Norman Rockwell. Delaware Art Museum is presenting this show as a more natural fit, I suppose, than Brandywine River Museum would have provided. After all, it's a question of who is the rightful heir, artistically, to Pyle, the granddaddy of American illustration.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman Rockwell, who illustrated the traditions and humor of small-town America on magazine covers, will be remembered Friday with five commemoratives. A single 29-cent stamp features a self-portrait of the artist that appeared on the cover of a 1960 issue of the Saturday Evening Post that contained excerpts of Rockwell's autobiography. The other four stamps, each 50 cents in denomination, will be issued in a miniature sheet proclaiming freedom of speech and worship and freedom from fear and want.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | by Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a medical office in Bustleton that really puts "family" into "family medicine. " It's there that Dr. Donald Stoltz, who has been watching out for the health of Northeast residents since 1961, was joined recently by his son, Dr. Bradley J. Stoltz. "It's something I've looked forward to for a long time," the senior Stoltz said. "Many fathers would like their sons to work with them in their profession or business. " The dream became a reality for him when his son completed a residency at Norristown's Suburban General Hospital and decided to work with his dad. "We get along very well," said Brad Stoltz, 29. "I feel comfortable asking questions if I'm not sure about something.
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