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Normandy

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NEWS
July 4, 2003 | By Ann Dow
Independence Day has had many meanings for me as the years have flown by. Growing up in Atlantic City, I looked forward to the first week of July as a time of getting together with summer friends whose parents rented an apartment in our Inlet neighborhood every year - for as short as a week, or as long as a month. Our friendships blossomed anew each July, and we bade sad farewells when the time came for them to return to their "real" homes. They envied me because I got to stay at "America's Favorite Playground" year-round, and I envied them because most had their own bedrooms and did not have to share with a half-dozen siblings.
SPORTS
June 13, 1994 | by Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Sports Writer
Michael Sheplock timed it just right Saturday night. He turned on his radio just as Darren Daulton stepped to the plate. That was when Harry Kalas announced that Daulton was batting for Sheplock in the Daily News Home Run Payoff Contest. Daulton's fifth-inning home run couldn't keep the Phillies from losing to the St. Louis Cardinals, 7-4, but but it did make Sheplock $1,000 richer. "I always listen to the radio, and when he hit it I said, 'Uh-oh.' I knew it was gone, gone, gone.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Stephen Birnbaum, Special to the Inquirer
I see lots of articles about the French Riviera, but I understand that the coast of Normandy is even more fashionable in summer. There are supposed to be all sorts of events and attractions there, and I remember seeing scenes of this area in the movie "Gigi. " Can you tell me anything about it? The coastal cities of Honfleur, Deauville and Trouville, and the Normandy beaches that were the scenes of the D-Day landings in World War II, are among France's most popular vacation sites.
NEWS
February 15, 2004 | By Robert H. Diefenbacher FOR THE INQUIRER
In October 2002, my wife and I enjoyed a two-week tour through France. Every day was filled with memorable moments, but my experience at the American Military Cemetery in Normandy will stay with me longest. Stunning in its simple, organized beauty, the cemetery is precisely laid out on grass trimmed as smoothly as a golf course fairway's. Row upon row of brilliant white grave markers flow across the gently undulating landscape, which overlooks the sea across which all these brave men traveled to their untimely deaths.
NEWS
May 27, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
"Soldiers, sailors and airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Forces! You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave allies and brothers-in-arms on other fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over oppressed peoples of Europe and security for ourselves in a free world!"
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ARMY VETERAN Harry Snyder used to have the letter the French schoolteacher sent to his mother in Philadelphia asking if he'd survived the war. He can't find it anymore. It's been 70 years. Snyder, 92, doesn't know if his mother ever wrote the man back. He doesn't know if the teacher who invited him to his home for dinner when he was a young soldier ever knew that, unlike so many others, he made it out alive. A group of young filmmakers from the Philly suburbs is hoping to give Snyder the chance to find that schoolteacher and to visit France, which he last saw during the Invasion of Normandy 70 years ago. "This isn't like going to the mall or something," Snyder said.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | Associated Press
COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France - Veterans of the 1944 Normandy landings gathered Thursday at the site of history's largest amphibious invasion for a day of ceremonies marking D-Day's 69th anniversary. Around two dozen U.S. vets, some in their old uniforms pinned with medals, stood and saluted during a wreath-laying ceremony at the memorial overlooking Omaha Beach, where a U.S. cemetery holds the remains of Americans who died during the vicious battle to storm the French beach under withering Nazi fire.
NEWS
June 6, 1994 | By ROY GODSON
Today, we celebrate the spectacular achievements, and honor the tremendous sacrifice, of D-Day - June 6, 1944. But the retelling of the massive invasion - 5,000 ships, 20,000 vehicles, 150,000 soldiers on June 6 alone - will be incomplete if we do not also recall that D-Day's success was made possible by a counterintelligence operation so well-planned and coordinated that it remains to this day a standard of excellence. British security forces were remarkably successful in detecting German spies sent to infiltrate the United Kingdom.
NEWS
April 26, 1994 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In late May, they will begin to depart for the battlefield. Only this time, no one is ordering them to go. They will be driven by needs of their own. "I want to see the beachhead again, plus the cemetery with all the guys I left behind," said Anthony DiStephano, now retired from the post office in Trenton. "Somehow, it gives me a sense of peace to go back," said Norvin Nathan, a lawyer from Bristol. "It is the one place in the entire world where I know I really accomplished something.
NEWS
May 23, 2004 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In May 2000, while taking part in a sand sculpture competition in Hardelot, France, on the English Channel, John Gowdy dug up a strip of barbed wire that got him thinking about history. During World War II, the Germans had fortified the coast, and wire such as this, he determined, greeted the Allied soldiers who stormed ashore on the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944. "Here's an event that happened on a beach that everyone knows about, and I thought, 'Wouldn't it be something to reenact this thing on the sand they actually died on, that their blood was shed on?
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NEWS
October 13, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE ACTIVITY ROOM was full of quiet men in wheelchairs. Women in nursing scrubs popped in to say hello to one of them, Edward Brown, and he smiled and blew kisses back in their direction. A therapist who worked at the Veterans Memorial Home in Vineland, Cumberland County, hugged Brown briefly and leaned against a doorway, drying her eyes as she smiled at him. "He's a beautiful man," the woman, Donna Hickman, said. Brown, 94, seemed untouched by age on this October morning, his memory sparkling in high-definition, his electric wheelchair far too fast for the administration's comfort.
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first time John Perozzi went to Sainte-Mère-Église, he parachuted into a war zone, with the crack, crack, crack of gunfire all around him. The Camden native dropped several hundred feet to a farm, helped liberate the French town, and was shot as the Allies invaded Normandy. Seventy years later, a decidedly different reception awaited him. Perozzi was greeted like a hero when he returned shortly before the June 6 anniversary of D-Day. A French woman, Cecile Gancel, who was about 11 when he parachuted onto her farm field, welcomed him with a warm embrace and pointed out where he landed.
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ARMY VETERAN Harry Snyder used to have the letter the French schoolteacher sent to his mother in Philadelphia asking if he'd survived the war. He can't find it anymore. It's been 70 years. Snyder, 92, doesn't know if his mother ever wrote the man back. He doesn't know if the teacher who invited him to his home for dinner when he was a young soldier ever knew that, unlike so many others, he made it out alive. A group of young filmmakers from the Philly suburbs is hoping to give Snyder the chance to find that schoolteacher and to visit France, which he last saw during the Invasion of Normandy 70 years ago. "This isn't like going to the mall or something," Snyder said.
TRAVEL
February 2, 2014 | By Kirsten Byrne, For The Inquirer
We'd been planning the trip since Lauren was 7, soon after I heard about the Sweet 16 parties South Jersey parents threw for their girls. Elaborate occasions with multi-course meals, tributes, and even a first dance with Dad seemed more fitting for a bride than for an adolescent's coming-of-age. Soon after my own 16th birthday, I'd left home for a summer tour of Europe. I couldn't re-create that life-altering trip for Lauren, but I wanted to at least give her a taste of it. The idea came when I'd married her father 10 months after relocating from the West Coast to join his family.
TRAVEL
November 11, 2013 | By Robin B. Smith, For The Inquirer
NORMANDY, France - At dawn on June 6, 1944, Allied forces landed on the northern coast of France, and June will mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the World War II military operation against the German march to dominate Europe, which began with American, British, and Canadian sacrifices of a magnitude unimaginable to all but survivors of infantry and invasion warfare. A visit to the Normandy beaches, invasion sites, and cemeteries is an opportunity to appreciate today's freedom by honoring not only the soldiers who died but also the survivors - and to attempt to grasp the horror of war by seeing the battlefields and mind-numbing rows of headstones.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
The Ghost Riders of Ordebec By Fred Vargas Translated from the French by Sian Reynolds Penguin. 368 pp., $15 Reviewed by Peter Rozovsky   Fred Vargas' novels are sold as crime fiction, and she has done well for herself under that label, winning three International Dagger Awards for best translated crime novel from the Crime Writers' Association in Great Britain and topping best-seller lists in several European...
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | Associated Press
COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France - Veterans of the 1944 Normandy landings gathered Thursday at the site of history's largest amphibious invasion for a day of ceremonies marking D-Day's 69th anniversary. Around two dozen U.S. vets, some in their old uniforms pinned with medals, stood and saluted during a wreath-laying ceremony at the memorial overlooking Omaha Beach, where a U.S. cemetery holds the remains of Americans who died during the vicious battle to storm the French beach under withering Nazi fire.
NEWS
May 27, 2013
The Guns at Last Light The War in Western Europe, 1944-45 Volume Three of the Liberation Trilogy By Rick Atkinson Henry Holt, 896 pp. $38 Reviewed by Chris Patsilelis   Rick Atkinson opens The Guns at Last Light with a stirring set piece. The Allied generals are meeting to put the finishing touches on Operation Overlord, the June 6, 1944, invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Here is the 53-year-old Supreme Allied Commander, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, "a man at peace with his soul" but also a man with "high blood pressure, chronic headaches, and ringing in one ear" who smoked 80 Camels a day. Without his usual grin, he implores his staff: "I consider it to be the duty of anyone who sees a flaw in the plan not to hesitate to say so. " Here is British Field Marshal Gen. Bernard L. Montgomery, "a wiry, elfin figure" with a narrow, foxlike face "in immaculate battle dress," popping to his feet, "pointer in hand.
SPORTS
May 13, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE TRAINER of Normandy Invasion said his fourth-place finisher in the Kentucky Derby will miss the Preakness and get ready for a summer campaign that includes the Travers Stakes in August. Trainer Chad Brown said yesterday that after a talk with owner Rick Porter the decision was made to rest the colt rather than bring him back on 2 weeks' rest. Normandy Invasion took the lead in the stretch of last weekend's Derby before finishing fourth, 3 1/2 lengths behind Orb. Orb went for a 1 1/2-mile gallop around Belmont Park yesterday, and is set for his final workout today before being vanned to Baltimore for the Saturday's Preakness.
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