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Norristown High Speed Line

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NEWS
September 19, 2011 | Staff Report
SEPTA's Norristown High Speed Line is operating normally again for the first time since tracks were damaged by storm waters on Sept. 9. Passengers should board trolleys on their regular platforms, SEPTA said this morning. Trolleys will operate every 15 minutes to Bryn Mawr and every 30 minutes to the Norristown Transportation Center, the transit agency said. Contact the Breaking News Desk at 215-854-2443 or online@phillynews.com .
NEWS
October 24, 1986 | Special to The Inquirer / THERESA McGETTIGAN
HELP ARRIVES from Chicago at the SEPTA car barn in Upper Darby. The second- hand rail car, one of 10 purchased from the Chicago Transit Authority for stopgap service on the Route 100 Norristown High Speed Line, was trucked in yesterday. The cars cost $250 each and $4,000 to ship and are expected to be in service in December after being refurbished.
NEWS
September 28, 1995 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Buying a ticket on SEPTA's Pig and Whistle train no longer will be like buying a pig in a poke, promises SEPTA general manager Louis Gambaccini. After spending $160 million to upgrade signals, tracks, and stations on its Norristown High-Speed Line, P&W commuters will no longer have to ponder what the odds are on getting good service. The Norristown High-Speed Line operates along the 13.4 miles right-of-way built shortly after the turn of the century for commuters using services on the old Philadelphia & Western (P&W)
NEWS
December 12, 2011
An 18-year-old man was struck and killed by a SEPTA train on the Norristown High Speed Line between the Penfield and West Overbrook stations about 2:30 a.m. Sunday, Haverford Township police reported. Police did not release the victim's name, pending notification of his family. Sgt. Michael Glenn, a spokesman for Haverford police, said SEPTA and township police were investigating. The victim, who was struck on the inbound SEPTA track, was pronounced dead at the scene. There were no injuries to the train operator or passengers, police said.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WILL THOUSANDS OF workers finally be able to ride high-speed rail to King of Prussia and Valley Forge instead of a bus that relies on the Jekyll/Hyde, highway to heaven/hell, Russian-roulette insanity of I-76 traffic? SEPTA will reveal plans for long-awaited rail service to King of Prussia Mall and Valley Forge at a four-hour public meeting tomorrow. Several alternative extensions of the Norristown High Speed Line to King of Prussia and Valley Forge will be presented. Public comment is invited.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
STARTING Monday, SEPTA will extend its citywide "Pay As You Enter" fares to the last outpost of distance-dependent "Pay As You Exit" fares when it converts Suburban Transit Routes leaving 69th Street Transportation Center. This eliminates "Pay As You Exit" logjams - exiting riders had to pay at the front while incoming riders were boarding there. Cash fares for all bus, subway and trolley riders are $2.25, except for premium routes 123, 124 and 125 to King of Prussia/Valley Forge ($3.75)
NEWS
September 14, 1987 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
A congressional hearing on the safety of the SEPTA transit system is being planned by a House panel responsible for appropriating funds for mass transit. The hearing, tentatively scheduled for Monday, Sept. 21, in Philadelphia, is expected to focus on the string of SEPTA accidents in recent years, said Rep. William H. Gray 3rd, D.-Pa., who requested the hearing. SEPTA has been plagued with accidents, particularly on the Norristown High- Speed Line, and the hearing could result in lawmakers pushing for more funds to improve equipment and operations of the mass transit system.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA has been plagued with major crashes since January 1984. Although federal transportation officials say SEPTA has one of the highest accident rates on the East Coast, only one of the SEPTA multiple-vehicle crashes in the last four years involved a fatality. In that crash, on Aug. 23, 1986, one person was killed and 41 were injured when a Norristown High-Speed Line trolley slammed into a wall at the 69th Street Terminal. SEPTA blamed the accident on operator error, saying the driver had failed to turn off the power.
NEWS
January 10, 1987
As riders confront SEPTA's latest money crisis and wonder where all the money goes, they would be well-advised to consider who is going to pay the costs of the near-murderous vandalism on the Norristown High Speed Line in December 1985. The answer, dear rider, is you! Our depraved legal system, not content to let the vandals responsible get off with little punishment, is poised, as usual, to give a blank check to ambulance-chasing lawyers at SEPTA's (no, make that SEPTA's riders')
NEWS
January 27, 1987 | By Katharine Seelye and Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
Eighteen people were injured last night when a Route 100 Norristown High- Speed Line trolley plowed into the rear of a trolley that had stopped because a work car had broken down on the tracks near the Ardmore Station in Haverford Township, authorities said. "We came around the corner and there was no way we could stop," said Craig Uren, 22, a passenger from Upper Merion Township. "The alarm went off. The driver said, 'Oh, my God!' and we (he and the driver) ran back - otherwise we would have been killed.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wetter. Warmer. Wilder. That long-term weather forecast for the Philadelphia region means trouble for SEPTA, especially on its railroad, subway, and trolley routes. A federal report released this month, which used SEPTA as a case study for the nation's transit systems, predicts that average temperatures in Philadelphia will rise by 3 to 6 degrees by 2050, with greater annual rainfall and more frequent "heavy precipitation events. " That means SEPTA can expect more flooding, sagging rail-power lines, mudslides, toppled trees, and washed-out rail beds.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's plan to expand rail service to King of Prussia got a major boost from the state with last year's transportation-funding bill. Yet two years into the project's planning, funding remains its largest hurdle. "We have funds for about 30 percent of the design, but the big question is: How do we pay for the construction?" SEPTA general manager Joseph M. Casey said Tuesday. "We need help, we need financial help, to get this going. " Casey gathered with fellow planners and politicians at the Chemical Heritage Foundation to discuss the need for rail service linking Philadelphia to King of Prussia, and what it would take to make it happen.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
STARTING Monday, SEPTA will extend its citywide "Pay As You Enter" fares to the last outpost of distance-dependent "Pay As You Exit" fares when it converts Suburban Transit Routes leaving 69th Street Transportation Center. This eliminates "Pay As You Exit" logjams - exiting riders had to pay at the front while incoming riders were boarding there. Cash fares for all bus, subway and trolley riders are $2.25, except for premium routes 123, 124 and 125 to King of Prussia/Valley Forge ($3.75)
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SAYS something about Kelly Morris that his funeral was attended by nearly 1,000 people, that SEPTA, his employer, had to use two buses to bring co-workers to the services. What it says is that Kelly James Morris was an exceptional human being, a man who captured the hearts and esteem of just about everybody he came in contact with. He was a man who could never pass up a chance to help a person who needed his special brand of love and caring, be it the children of neighbors, family or friends who needed a surrogate dad, the elderly, the hungry, prisoners - the full spectrum of human need.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
According to SEPTA, the Broad Street Line, Market-Frankford Line, Norristown High Speed Line, Trolley Routes (10, 11, 13, 15, 34, 36, 101, 102), Bus routes, excluding route 78, and CCT service, will remain in operation. Bus 78 will be temporarily suspended, SEPTA said. "To accommodate the anticipated additional volume of customers, Market-Frankford, Broad Street, Norristown High Speed, and Trolleys will run extra capacity between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m," SEPTA posted onto its website, SEPTA.org.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA railroad engineers and electrical workers went on strike early Saturday, halting commuter rail service in the Philadelphia region, after last-ditch efforts by federal mediators failed to break an impasse in the long-running labor dispute. The strike shut down 13 Regional Rail lines that provide 60,000 passengers with 126,000 rides on a typical weekday. That promised to snarl already clogged highways with additional cars and to hamper commuters and their employers throughout the region.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though buses, trains and planes could be delayed because of the snowstorm forecasted to hit the Philadelphia region Sunday, announcements about those likely delays are right on schedule. A spokeswoman for the Philadelphia International Airport said Sunday afternoon that airlines were reporting "96 canceled flights tonight in anticipation of the storm. " Most airlines reported reducing flight activity tomorrow until noon, said spokeswoman Victoria Lupica. "We are fully staffed and prepared to treat all paved surfaces when precipitation begins," she said.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
KING OF PRUSSIA SEPTA planners have provided more details about the proposed rail extension to King of Prussia, including comparisons of a ground-level train instead of an elevated track along Route 202. In public comments this summer, some residents expressed concern about the aesthetics of an elevated rail line along Route 202, said Byron Comati, SEPTA planning director. "We're trying to be very responsive," he said at a meeting Thursday at the Radisson Hotel at Valley Forge. "We're not going to pass judgment yet and say this is a better way. . . . But it comes with, unfortunately, a slew of other issues.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WILL THOUSANDS OF workers finally be able to ride high-speed rail to King of Prussia and Valley Forge instead of a bus that relies on the Jekyll/Hyde, highway to heaven/hell, Russian-roulette insanity of I-76 traffic? SEPTA will reveal plans for long-awaited rail service to King of Prussia Mall and Valley Forge at a four-hour public meeting tomorrow. Several alternative extensions of the Norristown High Speed Line to King of Prussia and Valley Forge will be presented. Public comment is invited.
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